Remembering Tony Scott - Part I

Remembering Tony Scott - Part I

MovieBob takes a look back at the work of Tony Scott, acclaimed director and filmmaker.

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Shame about his suicide. I can understand why he wouldn't want to deal with his illness, but you would think he could have killed himself in a less...messy way.

OK. That's it. Tony Scott Marathon.

Funny how the name of my hometown is also San Pedro.
Well, guess I'm off to ask my dad for his copy of Spy Game on DVD

I notice that BSG might've taken some cues from Crimson Tide :] good stuff

Quentin Tarantino made an early name for himself in Hollywood via a monologue
(linked in the Top Gun entry) about gay subtext in Scott's Top Gun, and here Scott directs the future heavy-hitter's first (intact) screenplay.

Er... Okay, first off, I could be wrong about this; I know release dates don't necessarily coincide with when movies were in production, but I still have to point this out.

Sleep With Me, the movie from which the Tarantino "Top Gun" monologue derives, was released in 1994. True Romance was released in 1993. So unless Sleep was in the can earlier and held, it doesn't seem accurate to suggest that the one led to the other.

Shame about Tony Scott's death. I'd say the film world lost a legend. I liked how you filled the Top Gun desrciption with TVTrope names. And were you implying everything Tarantino wrote was a thinly disguised rant on what he thought about this piece of pop-culture or that?

Thank you. The Hunger is one of my favorite films, and I was terribly saddened to hear of Tony Scott's death. I'm really glad someone is taking notice.

I never quite understand all of the critical disdain or resentment for movies like Top Gun and Days of Thunder? Yes Crimson Tide and Quenton Tarantino make pop cultre references. But Top Gun etc ARE the pop culture referenced. There is something to be said for well done pure adrenaline visual movies. And these are the flicks that pretty much created and defined that style of storytelling.

I really don't want to get into a political argument, beyond for all of Bob's cynicism and dislike of the Reagan era, I am guessing he is not truly old enough to have any real memories of what came before it? Just how bad the 70's were? Bob so prides himself on learning his trade involving movies and filmaking over the years. Great! But if he is going to drop historical political commentary into his reviews it would really behoove him to learn some real history. Not simply the stuff that some whack job from either side tells him his opinions about. The real whys and whats.

Who was the DOP on Top Gun? Because I don't remember seeing a tobacco grad in every fucking scene in Tony Scott's other films. From oiled up topless beach volleyball to the cack handed use of filters Top Gun is a very strange film.

Sad news indeed. Made worse by the fact that he leaves behind twin children.

You'll never find a Tony Scott movie in my top 10 favourites but they are definitely entertaining and definitely worth watching.

Did Bob intentionally screw up just about every movie's description to see if we are paying attention or has he just not seen any of these films?

Top Gun: Navel Aviators are not Air Force Pilots (I know, already pointed out).
You also didn't discover that it was homoerotic, you cribbed that from QT. For everyone else it was a great 80's action film. And so straightly romantic that "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" has become camp rather than romantic.

Days of Thunder: Tom's character was from the Southern stock car circuit, not open-wheel. Big difference. Open-wheel is a higher difficulty than stock car and he would have known a hell of a lot about what needs adjusting on a car.

Crimson Tide: This film was never taken seriously by anyone. It was a naked attempt to rip off 'The Hunt For Red October' and was a real snooze with the leads being caricatures. If the description is wrong, I can't tell since I've worked hard to forget it.

True Romance: Not an intact version of QT's script. It was supposed to be non-linear, much like Pulp Fiction, and was not supposed to have a happy ending. (There is a fanedit floating around that was recut to the script... a very different film.)
Also it was a bit more than a 'bag of cocaine' (which suggests you can put it in your pocket). It is a suitcase of cocaine.

Revenge: Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't it Anthony Quinn's character taking revenge on Costner for sleeping with his wife? Sure it works out badly for him, but things turned out badly for everyone.

I'd argue that the description of the Hunger seems pretty dubious, but I haven't actually seen it in something like 20 years.

Perhaps you shouldn't replace actual knowledge of films with a Wikipedia search.

(Also, I'm pretty sure Callate is right about True Romance being an earlier film than Sleep With Me. I'm going to go out on a limb and say even Pulp Fiction was out before Sleep With Me.)

I watched Man on Fire a while back and didn't like it at all (save for the scenes Denzel Washington and Dakota Fanning had together). Then I saw Déjà Vu more recently and really didn't care for that one either. After that I kind of concluded his stuff wasn't for me.

Still, it's a shame to hear about his death :(

Imp Emissary:
I can understand why he wouldn't want to deal with his illness, but you would think he could have killed himself in a less...messy way.

I would have done it in a more messy way.
Seriously, faced with a terminal illness, two options:
"Did you hear about Jim? Died in hospital, suffered horribly for months before that though."
or
"Did you hear about Jim? Of course you did! he found out he was dying so he jumped a fence at the zoo and challenged a bear to a fight to the death!"

pretzil:

Imp Emissary:
I can understand why he wouldn't want to deal with his illness, but you would think he could have killed himself in a less...messy way.

I would have done it in a more messy way.
Seriously, faced with a terminal illness, two options:
"Did you hear about Jim? Died in hospital, suffered horribly for months before that though."
or
"Did you hear about Jim? Of course you did! he found out he was dying so he jumped a fence at the zoo and challenged a bear to a fight to the death!"

Or he could have picked a way to die that wouldn't mean his family had to identify his post splat body. I'm not saying he had to go and battle his illness to the death, but I do think there was a less "damaging" way he could have chosen to kill himself. If not for himself then for his family.

However, it's to late for that, so at least he is at peace now.

I never thought someone could describe Beverly Hills Cop II as "a betrayal of the first film."

Even if a lot of these movies are remembered today as nothing more than cheese 80's nostalgia flicks there's something to be said about this guy's legacy and how his movies left a visible print on American pop-culture.

I still think most of his films blow, maybe its because I'm not American.

I really hope that when you talk about Unstoppable you mention the constant circling of the camera. Srsly, it made me dizzy.

"How can we get this boring train ride to seem intense?"
"AGGRESSIVE CIRCLE PANNING!!!"

He'll never have the same place in popular culture as his brother, Ridley, but for all that, I personally think Tony was a far more consistent director. Ridley Scott managed to direct two of the all-time greatest sci-fi films one after the other, then spent the following decades trying to remember how to be a great director, with mixed results. Tony Scott's films may never have had the lofty ideals or artistic leanings of Ridley's, but he was also able to churn out entertaining films at a far more consistent rate. And for all that he embraced the mainstream blockbuster approach of Hollywood, he always had a stylish, smart flair in his films that other action movies lacked. You only have to look at Man On Fire, and its influence on the likes of Max Payne 3, to see that Tony Scott had his own kind of vision for action cinema.

Also, True Romance is one of the greatest crime films ever made by man. A top notch script from Tarantino, smart assured direction from Scott, and an absolutely stellar cast all doing some of their best performances ever. The scene between Dennis Hopper and Christopher Walken has to be one of the greatest on-screen confrontations in history, and personally I don't think Gary Oldman ever did a better performance than as Drexl.

Really scary! Bev. Hills Cop 2 is on netflix streaming! Exciting. Bad news... got 1/5 stars from viewers! But I didn't know Tony Scott was involved. Just watched the opening with Bridgette Neilson. Not bad at all.

 

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