Nerd Is a Universal Language

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Nerd Is a Universal Language

It doesn't matter what country you are from or what gender you are, we can still argue about Star Wars.

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Get along on the internet?! What madness is this!? I think you need to mass produce whatever you're smoking XD

Actually I wonder how many people who hate each other on this site would geek-out together if they met IRL. I guess the Expo showed how geeks are far more agreeable when they're face-to-face.

I disagree with everything!!

:P

LOL

Hear, hear. This is actually one of the big things I really love about comic book conventions: the fact that I can pretty much pick a person at random, walk up to them, start talking, and be reasonably certain that we'll have a lot in common. It's so utterly different from normal life, where strangers on the bus are generally ignored at best, and certainly never enthusiastically spoken to, and it's one of the things that make conventions so fun for me.

Fappy:
Get along on the internet?! What madness is this!? I think you need to mass produce whatever you're smoking XD

Actually I wonder how many people who hate each other on this site would geek-out together if they met IRL. I guess the Expo showed how geeks are far more agreeable when they're face-to-face.

A cynic might say they're only more agreeable because they have shed the veil of anonymity.

Tito's article kinda bothers me; I for one do not particularly enjoy being talked at by people just because they happen to enjoy one or two of the same hobbies.

I actually agree with him on almost every point, it's a view I share that we should all be more accepting of each other. Not worldwide, just us, Escapists, geeks, nerds. Doesn't matter where you're from, we share one thing in common and we should be embracing it.

Also... I really miss D&D... oh wait! BGEE is playable in 45 minutes! Wooo

JEBWrench:

Tito's article kinda bothers me; I for one do not particularly enjoy being talked at by people just because they happen to enjoy one or two of the same hobbies.

I totally get where you are coming from. Nerds can be weird and annoying, but I don't think Tito expects everyone to become best pals just because we share common interests. I think the point is that we should focus more on the positive aspects of our common interests, otherwise we may overlook those we'd call friends under different circumstances. That's the way I interpreted it anyway.

Fappy:
Get along on the internet?! What madness is this!? I think you need to mass produce whatever you're smoking XD

Actually I wonder how many people who hate each other on this site would geek-out together if they met IRL. I guess the Expo showed how geeks are far more agreeable when they're face-to-face.

I think the internet has some chemical compound that multiplies the amount of testosterone and pure rage that a person has in their body by 1000 times.

OT: I'm not so sure how well I would mix in, to be honest. I love games, for sure, and I know a lot about them. But I hardly ever watch television or new movies, I don't read comics, I don't watch Anime, I don't play D&D or other assorted P&P RPGs, etc.

I can nerd out about the television/movies I do watch, and I guess I do know a very miniscule amount about the most well-known parts of Marvel-canon, but the only things I can really go all out on with full thrusters are video games or music (and nobody likes most of the music I listen to).

Fappy:

JEBWrench:

Tito's article kinda bothers me; I for one do not particularly enjoy being talked at by people just because they happen to enjoy one or two of the same hobbies.

I totally get where you are coming from. Nerds can be weird and annoying, but I don't think Tito expects everyone to become best pals just because we share common interests. I think the point is that we should focus more on the positive aspects of our common interests, otherwise we may overlook those we'd call friends under different circumstances. That's the way I interpreted it anyway.

Vitriol is the renewable fuel resource that keeps online communities powered.

Your interpretation is fair; I was just rubbed the wrong way. Especially the "our people" line. It seems to imply more pigeonholing, which I kinda thought that article was advocating against.

shrekfan246:

OT: I'm not so sure how well I would mix in, to be honest. I love games, for sure, and I know a lot about them. But I hardly ever watch television or new movies, I don't read comics, I don't watch Anime, I don't play D&D or other assorted P&P RPGs, etc.

I can nerd out about the television/movies I do watch, and I guess I do know a very miniscule amount about the most well-known parts of Marvel-canon, but the only things I can really go all out on with full thrusters are video games or music (and nobody likes most of the music I listen to).

But you could bond with people over a mutual love of Shrek, or any one of the things you do like; no matter what, there are going to be people who want to talk to you about it and have good time doing so.

Or there is my default when meeting nerds I don't know: get them to talk about their fandom. There is literally just about nothing a person likes to do more than to talk about something they are passionate about. I just nod and smile, and pretty soon they think we're friends, and then we can be friends.

Anachronism:
Hear, hear. This is actually one of the big things I really love about comic book conventions: the fact that I can pretty much pick a person at random, walk up to them, start talking, and be reasonably certain that we'll have a lot in common. It's so utterly different from normal life, where strangers on the bus are generally ignored at best, and certainly never enthusiastically spoken to, and it's one of the things that make conventions so fun for me.

absolutely. i remember at games day (Games workshop's big convention for their warhammer boardgame franchises), while just waiting in line to get some forgeworld stuff i just started a conversation with a group of people, and then some guys on the other side of the barrier (it was one of those zigzag ones) joined in, and we were all just geeking out about how super cool the forgeworld sculpts were, discussing army builds and tactics, fun paint projects and models we had seen, and all that good stuff.

Conventions are just the best for finding others who speak your dialect of nerd, and having a damn fine time talking about it.

So much better of a thing to focus on.

We have so many things that bring us together rather than make us hate each other. Freedom is worth sticking up for. Rather than being bound to every little preference and taking it upon yourself to force everyone else to agree with.

I actually agree about most of this, from the perspective that the Internet and globalization are really awesome this way, and how these subcultures practically turn into full cultures accross the word.

On the other hand, I'm not a big fan of that "always love and tolerate each other above everything else" rhetoric. The internet is awesome precisely because it lets me cherry pick the people who like the same things as me and connect with them, not because it obliges me to connect with an arbitarily decided group of so-called "nerds".

This is not a church, or a nation, where I would make some forced "All are welcome" statement or I am a bigot for hating people who are different. The best thing about nerds is how weirdly unique they can be, how different we are together from everyone else. This is what makes them "my people", not some hard rule about how all speculative fiction, new media, and/or Japanese media, are inherently nerdy just because, and I must treat them as the in-group.

On the reverse side I find it almost impossibly difficult to talk to "regular" people. For instance when I first went to college, all the guys on my dorm floor talked more or less about two things: sports and super models. Sports, okay, but I did not know that it was thing for guys to opnely talk about how hot they thought various supermodels were.

While I agree with points made in your article, Mr. Tito, and have been saying much the same for quite some time now, I fear most of it will either fall on deaf ears or, hypocritically, be agreed upon and thusly ignored.

In fact, I'd wager that this very thread will devolve into an argument; likely on the very things you brought up; within three pages. By that point I'm almost certain at least two people will start arguing over EA, Activision, Steam, Valve, Mass Effect, Bioware, Half-Life, Call of Duty, or some other such thing.

I sincerely hope not, of course. I'd love to be proven wrong in my assumption.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to peruse the new forum posts and attempt to skim past all the angry, hate threads

I know we should not focus on our differences but I am interested to know something more about what you found that were different from your southern american culture and the Swedish/scandinavian. I am from Norway myself and we share alot of culture.

NERDS!!!!!!

*Insert picture of Ogre here.*

Seriously though, what is the deal with Dr. Who? Does he ride my little pony or something, I don't get it.

Greg Tito:
I know some people like to speak in hushed tones about the dangers of globalization, like it's some dirty word...

Not to get too off-topic, but I think they're talking about different types of "globalization." The "anti-globalization" protesters are mostly protesting global exploitation - where the ultra-wealthy corporations can feed on countries and cultures around the world world, but offer nothing back in return. It's basically a movement against pillaging the Earth's resources to make a few people rich.

It's interesting to note that the "anti-globalization" folk are usually also strong proponents of refugee rights - the right of humans to travel the world without borders. About a decade ago, I was involved with these kinds of movements, and I constantly disagreed with the way it was framed as "anti-globalization" - because it caused the exact kind of confusion demonstrated here - equating global economic exploitation with social/cultural globalization.

The other side of the coin, is that the multi-national companies, the ones who exploit resources regardless of borders, are the same ones who support things like region codes, and exclusive distribution rights into certain geographical "markets." They also tend to be the ones who like to keep people confined to their codified geographic regions.

So, there are so many contradictions that make this such a loaded term. If these company are supporting a globalist agenda so they can exploit resources, then they should also support free competition among geographical markets, but they don't. They want to outlaw selling retail goods from one country to another, while at the same time, outsourcing everything to the cheapest country possible. We have a global internet that dissolves borders, yet they want to keep us penned into these increasingly artificial regional markets.

there are to many different types of nerd, some of the words they other types of nerds make me want to hit them.
not because we dissagree, no no i can accept that ( you can be wrong about super paper mario if you want i know that game is good) what makes me want to hit them is they say very offensive things, and think they understand everything when they understand nothing.

oh,yes please impress me how you watched angry joe and movie bob and now you know everything about game design and can tell me how sh** works.
please tell me how i am suppose to victim blame dealing with bullied children...

-sighs-

and then this fake nerd girls thing, while i am all for people being a bit ticked off when people try to make shows like the big bang theory and try to appeal to you so hard you want to vomit, or fake nerdy show hosts. fine, be angry, i can even go to far as to say that feeling a little anger towards someone because they are wearing t-shirt or a cosplay and don't know who they just dressed up as ( i have seen this, how..)is somewhat reasonable, maybe you think people should think if they spend money on it maybe the should know what it is they put on their body. i cant say i agree with completely with that on but to some extent i get ya. but when you tap into your sexual insecurities and then project them on to innocents because they are too attractive to be at your convention, we need to have a serious talk. because that's not ok, that's not ok at all, especially when you just ignored they whole male side of the argument, to focus on the gender that wont let you have sex with them.

sorry on a tangent, basically some nerds make me want to hit them

Being Swedish I feel compelled to ask, what the heck is Bolles kök (Bolle's kitchen)?

Greg Tito:
It doesn't matter what country you are from or what gender you are, we can still argue about Star Wars.

I found this very interesting, largely because I (shameless plug ahoy!) wrote an article a little while ago with some very similar themes, albeit from a different angle. I focused more on the way we as nerds divide ourselves into ever-smaller subcultures and heirachies, as if to set ourselves above the most nerdish of nerds, although my conclusion was much the same as yours. You can view it here, if you should wish: http://ontologicalgeek.com/bronies-chaos-marines-and-dirty-little-secrets/

(fun fact, the "research" mentioned in the article was actually carried out on these very forums. Celebrity!)

Vigormortis:
In fact, I'd wager that this very thread will devolve into an argument; likely on the very things you brought up; within three pages. By that point I'm almost certain at least two people will start arguing over EA, Activision, Steam, Valve, Mass Effect, Bioware, Half-Life, Call of Duty, or some other such thing.

Old news, bro. We've abandoned all pretence at wanting rational debate, and now we just argue about who has the bigger dick.

Kinda sucks for the girls though, they never win.

To some extent, yes, there is an abundance of geek cultural overlap.

But universal... Sorry I think thats taking it too far. There are still levels of geekdom that are essentially mutually exclusive. While you might find common ground, its more like the transition between say, speaking German and Danish. Still two separated languages.

It's a universal language. But apparently you're not allowed to speak it if you have unpopular opinions or female genitalia

A Smooth Criminal:
It's a universal language. But you're not allowed to speak it if you have unpopular opinions or female genitalia

Yeah, I'm glad we passed that law preventing women from talking about Game of Thrones. It was getting pretty bad.

"Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go play D&D."
I am so goddamn sick of this cliche smarmy little ending 'zinger'. I would have stopped reading right there if it wasnt at the end of the article.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to read an article by someone with writing talent.

LiMaSaRe:
"Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go play D&D."
I am so goddamn sick of this cliche smarmy little ending 'zinger'. I would have stopped reading right there if it wasnt at the end of the article.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to read an article by someone with writing talent.

Wait, is that a thing? People use that regularly?

Did I miss something?

JEBWrench:

LiMaSaRe:
"Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go play D&D."
I am so goddamn sick of this cliche smarmy little ending 'zinger'. I would have stopped reading right there if it wasnt at the end of the article.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to read an article by someone with writing talent.

Wait, is that a thing? People use that regularly?

Did I miss something?

I think he was talking about the general snowclone, ending articles with the "And now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to ironically demonstrate my own above article." format

LiMaSaRe:
"Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go play D&D."
I am so goddamn sick of this cliche smarmy little ending 'zinger'. I would have stopped reading right there if it wasnt at the end of the article.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to read an article by someone with writing talent.

I actually played D&D after writing this editorial. I'm sorry that bothered you.

Kekkonen1:
Being Swedish I feel compelled to ask, what the heck is Bolles kök (Bolle's kitchen)?

Heh, it's the apartment where Boel lives and her friends have taken to checking in to Bolle's kok on Four Square or Facebook after the bars and clubs close. IIRC, it even has it's own Facebook page.

I'm sorry, I couldn't hear you over the constant berating of my gaming tastes.
I did hear someone tell me about "emo hair and giant swords" for the 10,000th time though...

A Smooth Criminal:
It's a universal language. But you're not allowed to speak it if you have unpopular opinions or female genitalia

Sounds about right.

Though I know plenty of female gamers out there, with popular opinions, that get along fine.
It just happens that many female gamers have tastes that differ from the "typical" young (13-25) male gamer (which makes sense in any media).

The difference between gaming and most other media is that the typical young male gamer is the majority consumer and they are well-known for being both mature and reasonable. On an unrelated topic, hell froze over and pigs learned to fly.

Greg Tito:

I actually played D&D after writing this editorial. I'm sorry that bothered you.

NERD! Go back to your mazes and monsters!

s69-5:
I'm sorry, I couldn't hear you over the constant berating of my gaming tastes.
I did hear someone tell me about "emo hair and giant swords" for the 10,000th time though...

You should try enjoying a modern military shooter unironically some time. It's great fun!

So now we can have shallow meaningless conversations about a different set of hit global media to people who have shallow conversations about mainstream hit global media?

When I started on the internet nerd conversations on the internet used to be about things like Rush, Kubrick, Discordianism and programming. Now it's better because it's more about Star Wars and Firefly?

Greg Tito:

Kekkonen1:
Being Swedish I feel compelled to ask, what the heck is Bolles kök (Bolle's kitchen)?

Heh, it's the apartment where Boel lives and her friends have taken to checking in to Bolle's kok on Four Square or Facebook after the bars and clubs close. IIRC, it even has it's own Facebook page.

I see, thought it was some kind of strange reference you were expected to realise if you came from Sweden, so I got kind of worried I had missed some sort of profound truth found only in the coldest most northern parts of the Swedish Tundra.

JEBWrench:

You should try enjoying a modern military shooter unironically some time. It's great fun!

I tried to enjoy them. It didn't happen...
I just don't enjoy FPS games that do not have VATS or a switchable third person option.

Also, for me: Swords > Guns.
Your mileage may vary.

I played the entire demo of Bioshock with a wrench instead of the guns that were provided.

When I'm forced to play Halo with friends I seek out the sword or simply use my fists (assassinations and beat downs) for about 80% of my kills. That is when I'm not wandering around, lost, because I can't see peripherally and find the first person view to be disorienting unless in a tunnel (like most dungeons are made in TES).

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