Reel Physics: The A-Team - Tank Flying

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That was pretty neat. Hope to see the next one sometime soon. Maybe they can explain how Maggie Q an withstand the crushing force of a car in Die Hard 4, or maybe they can discuss the tragectory of a moving car into a helicopter, like in Die Hard 4, or maybe they can discuss the plausibility of destroying a fighter jet with a big rig truck, as depicted in the movie, Die Hard 4.

Combustion Kevin:
I approve of this series!

damnit, where's more of it?!

Look for new episodes every Tuesday! The next show is Christmas Day and the following New Year's Day. I hope you can make time on those holidays to stop by and watch us!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

RoonMian:
I never even considered that they were shooting down to slow themselves... When I saw the movie I thought they were shooting down to make the water in the lake unruly because moving water offers less resistance... Which, in hindsight, I guess makes about as much sense as using the recoil to slow them down.

Indeed, you're right. The reduced impact in the water had about the same effect as the recoil on the tank's descent. Colby will explain that a bit further later here if you want more info.
Some stuff just had to be cut for time though.
Thanks for watching!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

I look forward to the next episode of this series!

It will be a good addition to the Escapist.

UNHchabo:
I like this series, and hope to see more of it!

Can you guys please put the citations as links below the video, so we don't have to manually copy them if we're interested in reading more?

If the show becomes popular enough, we plan on having a companion column where we can post research and calculations for you guys who are interested. If it is possible in the immediate future, I will add more information under the video for you guys to reference or possibly reference some of that material here in the episode thread.
Thanks!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

My head, it hurts.

Nice series, but all i got of it was "yea this could actually work" The rest.. meh not so much

Aw man, I haven't seen those equations in a really long time, but then again I mostly see the audio related ones. >.>

I really like this series and I can't wait to see more of this.

GO PHYSICS! :D

monev44:
I like this. My one remark on this episode would be. Yes they can survive the impact with the water, but what about the impact with the bottom of the lake? how deep would the water have to be for them to slow down enough so they don't impact the lake bed with more then a survivable G-force?

F = (1/2)*rho*Velocity^2*Surface area*Coefficient of drag

F = weight of tank = 22.25 tons = 197812.02 Newtons

sqrt(197812.02/.5*1000*2.69*2.55*0.8)=8.49 m/s or 18.9934 mph.

It would be perfectly fine.

DigitalSushi:

Hagi:

DigitalSushi:

Racing drivers especially in top tier racing such as Formula 1 often suffer much higher G-forces sustained over the course of a race (90 minutes), but racing cars are designed with a safety cell and the drivers were seat belts and other safety devices, tanks aren't built around safety (quite the opposite actually) so I assume they would be bouncing around in the compartment.

I'm fairly certain tanks are built around safety and resisting high velocity impacts, like you know... getting hit by another tank firing upon you...

I could be horribly wrong but I do think the reason they built tanks out of extremely thick armor is for keeping it operational in extremely dangerous situations or, as you could call it, keeping the important bits (like the crew) safe.

We could test it out, launch both a Formula 1 and a Tank at equal velocities at a mountain or something and see which one deals better with the G-forces involved. You can test the Formula 1, I'll be sitting in the tank if you don't mind.

That's fine with me dude, Heikki Kovalainen a Formula 1 driver survived a crash which the sensors recorded at 26g, then he was back racing at the next round 2 weeks later.

By safety what I mean is safety belts and and HANS device, which I don't think tanks have, so plummeting to Earth at 3 g while you could survive, I'm just saying you smacking your face against a monitor at 3 times the force of gravity would smart somewhat.

A comparable experience may be that of a wreckage rider of planes or even balloons.

Anakinnnn:

If the show becomes popular enough, we plan on having a companion column where we can post research and calculations for you guys who are interested. Otherwise, we have no control on how the show gets posted unfortunately. The only format we are allowed is the video itself but I will make a note of it.
Thanks!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

Yeah, I know the Escapist staff takes care of that, I just figured Justin would see my comment, since he was posting in the thread. :)

Now THIS is a good show! Looking forward to the next one (Which will coincidentally be released on christmas day!)

math is hard

I liked this and will look forward to more, did find one likely fault that would be hard to test or correct for:

MUD!

Didn't see the movie, can't know the environment, but most lakes have silt and mud on the bottom. Starting horizontal movement in mud isn't easy. Nazi's even tried it as an invasion plan for the Brits in WWII.

But maybe the bottom was rocky and such, then my point disappears.

apologies if I over looked another saying this, did try to quickly scan.

Ok, I believe the physics, but how can you explain Mr. T not being B.A. Barakus? That just doesn't make sense, so a flying tank is irrelevant.

Really great show, the best possible balance of teaching/enjoyment, I hope this one sticks around.

Also, this is science: Please use the Metric system, please, please, please. If not for scientific rigor, then at least because you are talking to an international audience that might not have a clue as to US units.
I know you did for some of it, but some things, like speed weren't.

A few things were left out though:

What would be the tensile strength of the parachute cables?, would one cable be able to carry an entire tank?
Also The chutes werend deployed instantly, so im wondering, would the speed at wich the parachute deployed not rip the chute to shreds?

Another thing that im wondering is, would the crew be able to handle tankshells in such a orientation/stress?
or is the tank outfitted with a automatic loading system, and if so, can this mechanism work in a vertical orientation?
The last thing im wondering about is, how plausible is the pendulum motion that they create by firing sidewards.

Length is important! They forgot the fraction of a percent contributed by shear drag! Hack frauds I say!!!1

Seriously, really looking forward to more episodes. I was pleasantly surprised that the sequence was plausible and that the show is going to be more than just ripping on movie physics.

I loved it, more of this please.

This was excellent.

Please give me more.

Ya'll probably would get more viewers with more topical stuff. I really liked this video, but The A-Team is ancient history to a lot of people. Especially on the internet.

They said that the tank cannon is fired roughly every 3 seconds during freefall. Did you check to see if it was possible to fire, reload and fire again in that timeframe?

I know as it was proven that firing the gun didn't have much of an effect on the tank's speed, but would be interesting to see if they had researched that as well.

SCIENCE!!!

Great show, I love the concept! One small nitpick (and it's not about the math / physics). Even though the tank and crew would survive the water impact, wouldn't the parachute keep them nose down as they hit the lake bottom? And if that's the case, wouldn't they pretty much still be there?

Few series really click with me right from the start... I usually have to warm up to them...

This one knocked it out of the park... I love it. I want more of it. I want it to have my babies.

MooseHowl:
SCIENCE! Cool! I thought that scene looked silly in the trailers... but maybe I should see the A-team movie, now. I think I could get to like this series, especially if you stick to analyzing situations that are remotely plausible.

To compare, I've read a few cases of stuff like "How can the Death Star blow up a planet?", and they all end up with stuff like "Step 1: Acquire more energy than humanity will ever have access to on Earth." Which is quite boring to read after the first time I read it. Stick with scenes reasonably grounded in reality and this could turn out both educational AND fun!

Some Advice:
I think the background music may need to be turned down a bit in the future. There were a few parts where I found the swelling trumpets (At least I think they were trumpets?) coincided with the speech, making it harder to hear what was being said.

Thanks for the feedback. I will check the audio levels and drop the music back in the mix some.
As for being grounded in reality, we absolutely agree. Our rules to do an episode are basically these: It has to take place on Earth, otherwise our physics calculations can't hold up. There must be some basic laws followed that are defined in the real world... so that means disregarding magic, high fantasy, otherworldly sci-fi, and superhero powers. Those movies can possibly be covered if the event we are discussing is still bound by the natural laws of physics.

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

CplDustov:
Really enjoyed this. Maybe you could get a column with the escapist to write about any follow-up issues that result from these comments. Some people have mentioned hitting the lake bed and the shoot sideways to steer part. How far would they travel per shot? How much of an effect does shooting the water to reduce impact help?

It's very possible with enough interest we may create a companion column to cover a lot of the extra details and formulas we gloss over in the video due to time constraints. Thanks for the feedback!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

rvdm88:
A few things were left out though:

What would be the tensile strength of the parachute cables?, would one cable be able to carry an entire tank?
Also The chutes werend deployed instantly, so im wondering, would the speed at wich the parachute deployed not rip the chute to shreds?

Another thing that im wondering is, would the crew be able to handle tankshells in such a orientation/stress?
or is the tank outfitted with a automatic loading system, and if so, can this mechanism work in a vertical orientation?
The last thing im wondering about is, how plausible is the pendulum motion that they create by firing sidewards.

These are all good questions. I don't have answers for all of them but I can speculate a bit. The tensile strength of the cables and the material of the parachute itself would probably more than be able to stand up to that stress. Those chute rigs (chute and cables) are usually rated about 3 or 4 times over what they need to be to handle the job, for this very scenario.

As for loading the tank shells, that would require a bit more research but it was irrelevant to the survivability of the fall which is what our end result was going after. Some of the things we just had to take on faith. And on the pendulum swinging of the tank firing, we did some calculations on that but ended up cutting that due to time. In future episodes, we will most likely be able to try to post some of that extra info somewhere to explain some things further.
Thanks for watching!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

This was interesting to see but honestly, I kind of zoned out when they went on the math tirades. I liked how at first, they just showed their sources in the background. But then they would just drone on about some coefficient velocity for a brick. I don't either understand or give a single fuck about that.

Simply state the sources and you'll have credibility with me. I hope they shorten the whole math business in future episodes. Beyond that, I look forward to watching some of these anyway.

Davey Woo:
They said that the tank cannon is fired roughly every 3 seconds during freefall. Did you check to see if it was possible to fire, reload and fire again in that timeframe?

I know as it was proven that firing the gun didn't have much of an effect on the tank's speed, but would be interesting to see if they had researched that as well.

I don't remember if we had that information in front of us or whether we were even able to obtain that info at all. I will double check our notes and possibly defer to Colby on what he came up with in regards to that.

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

I approve of this show. Please, continue. :)

You might want to talk to the Space Janitors people about getting rid of your green halos, though.

w00tage:
Great show, I love the concept! One small nitpick (and it's not about the math / physics). Even though the tank and crew would survive the water impact, wouldn't the parachute keep them nose down as they hit the lake bottom? And if that's the case, wouldn't they pretty much still be there?

This depends on the depth of the lake, whether there was an automatic disconnect for the chute cables, and how much buoyancy the chute would provide to the tank... which is most likely minimal. Fluid dynamics is a whole other episode in itself to try to solve that problem scientifically. I love the enthusiasm but at some point, we have to work with the facts we can find and solve the most basic of the problem first and foremost. Even WE have to go on faith sometimes... as I mentioned to a few other people here already. Hahahaha.
Thanks for watching!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

maninahat:
That was pretty neat. Hope to see the next one sometime soon. Maybe they can explain how Maggie Q an withstand the crushing force of a car in Die Hard 4, or maybe they can discuss the tragectory of a moving car into a helicopter, like in Die Hard 4, or maybe they can discuss the plausibility of destroying a fighter jet with a big rig truck, as depicted in the movie, Die Hard 4.

Sounds like an episode for REEL PHYSICS! Be on the lookout in the future for us to cover the Die Hard franchise.

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

very interesting and im looking forward to the next one. but my math still sucks.

maybe you should the part from charlies angels 2 with the helli scene falling down the damn. that would be interesting.

yngi:
math is hard

Nonsense. Math is just all too often poorly taught. :)

Yes but... ..where are the Zombies?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9i2FnRWdxI

Tank falling out of the Sky = Zombies.

Awesome! Will watch.

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