Dishonored: Operation Layarteb

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Dishonored: Operation Layarteb

Warning: "Spoilers" for Dishonored contained within.

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Reminds me of this clip from Doctor Who. This subtlety thing sure is hard, right?

Oh, I geddit.

He's the bad guy, right?

I'm actually wearing a "Curse your inevitable but sudden betrayal" Serenity shirt right now.

You could pretty much smell this comming from the point where you meet the admiral, or whatever he is.
Especially if you use the heart on him.

I agree, it's dull and frustrating when you can see it comming a mile away. You're doing all the heavy lifting and you can't even kill the fucker or subdue him and use your allies to back you up. Who'd want to fuck with you? You're the damn master assassin.

I just don't think the devs thought out that betrayal seen at all. I mean, even if you're completely unobservant, and ignore all the optional audio logs and whatnot, that mission where you go in for the Spymaster has absolutely none of the feel of a final, climactic mission. So you just know that there's more stuff coming, and since there aren't any high-priority governmental targets within Dunwall to take out, you have to start to wonder where the story's going. This alone doesn't scream 'BETRAYAL IMMINENT,' but it gives enough of a hint that the betrayal comes as no real surprise.

I love Dishonored, but it's strength definitely lies in the world it builds, not the rather flimsy characterization within that world.

I find obvious betrayals in general should be done earlier in the game while the player still believes they're still having to complete the given list of objectives before having that plot point come up.

Haven't played Dishonored yet so I'm guessing they do the betrayal at the usual time, once the evil todo list is complete.

I was warry of the bastards from the start, and doubly so once I figured out you could point the heart at people to hear their secrets. The whole situation had such an air of doom about it, and the way they used me to do THEIR dirty work.

BTW Cornvo is a former bodyguard Grey, not a spy.

Yep, knew it right from the start. Just like I figured out the twist in Kotor right after Telos got glassed.

Now, a game that does such a twist well?
Jade Empire. The game does present some subtle discrepancies in a certain very important character's claims, but they're more... convenient than suspicious. And when you play the second time through, you can actually see how the person in question is forced to play speed chess when some of their plans get hijacked by circumstance. It's clever and cool and I loved the game for it.

A bit of a clearer Spoiler warning on the main page would've been appreciated.

SonOfMethuselah:
I just don't think the devs thought out that betrayal seen at all. I mean, even if you're completely unobservant, and ignore all the optional audio logs and whatnot, that mission where you go in for the Spymaster has absolutely none of the feel of a final, climactic mission. So you just know that there's more stuff coming, and since there aren't any high-priority governmental targets within Dunwall to take out, you have to start to wonder where the story's going. This alone doesn't scream 'BETRAYAL IMMINENT,' but it gives enough of a hint that the betrayal comes as no real surprise.

I love Dishonored, but it's strength definitely lies in the world it builds, not the rather flimsy characterization within that world.

So, what you're saying is that if you do not pay attention to the narrative, the narrative doesn't impact you as much? Wow, that blows my mind.

Funny incident of a game telegraphing a betrayal, but missing it because of gameplay:

I explore everything and I used the heart, so yes I saw it coming. Although if you didn't explore or use the heart you would be suspicious but betrayel would be not quite as obvious.

You really need backdoor plots in games like these, eventually Samuel 'helps' you. But if you saw it coming you should have been able to talk to Samuel and ask for his help.

But anyways, during my interactions with Admiral Havelock, I constantly had that other Admiral (Ackbar) in the back of my mind warning me about something.

It was a funny comic, but I haven't actually played Dishonoured so I really would've appreciated a spoiler warning of some kind.

Also, on a note related to the comic, I thought to myself when I read the title "This must be a word spelled backwards! Lesse, Operation...Bertyala? What's Bertyala mean?"

And that just goes to show that I'm not as intelligent as I think I am.

I what to know why that bar has a shelf marked "poison."
Anyway, yeah betrayal in games is very hard to pull off successfully.

NameIsRobertPaulson:
Funny incident of a game telegraphing a betrayal, but missing it because of gameplay:

DVS BSTrD:
I was warry of the bastards from the start, and doubly so once I figured out you could point the heart at people to hear their secrets. The whole situation had such an air of doom about it, and the way they used me to do THEIR dirty work.

BTW Cornvo is a former bodyguard Grey, not a spy.

This is true, and important. It's part of Corvo's development in the story that he's goes from being a guy who just kinda obeys his superiors, to a guy who makes his own decisions for his own reasons. You're not really supposed to trust Havelock or any of the other conspirators bar a select few, but he is at least the Devil you know. Unlike the Outsider, who's motivations are above the understanding of mortals.

Erin Stout the video game character therapist? I wouldn't mind it becoming canon. And I never knew bars carried poison. I'll have to remember that for next time :)

GoddyofAus:
A bit of a clearer Spoiler warning on the main page would've been appreciated.

Yeah.... I'd have to agree here. I haven't beaten the game yet :(

I kind of figured those guys were going to betray me anyway though, so I guess it's not a huge deal.

-Dragmire-:
I find obvious betrayals in general should be done earlier in the game while the player still believes they're still having to complete the given list of objectives before having that plot point come up.

Haven't played Dishonored yet so I'm guessing they do the betrayal at the usual time, once the evil todo list is complete.

Unfortunately, yes...

And i'm surprised it took this long for Critical Miss to make this comic.

Yeah, I was convinced a betrayal was coming. However, I really didn't expect all three of them of to stab me in the back.

I didn't use the heart (except to find runes and bone charms), and I skipped most of the logs, so I actually didn't see this coming.

Ehh, didn't really see it coming. I didn't pay much attention To the audiographs or anything like that. In hindsight, I wasn't surprised that Havelock betrayed me but Martin certainly did surprise me. Seemed like a good guy to me.

Foolishly I knew a betrayal was coming but when he offered the drink it didn't occur to me it would be poisoned. I was expecting a 'Oh no I can't move' moment where Havelock and some thugs would attack you, so I wasn't disappointed.

Seen it coming from a mile away myself. Also tried not to kill so many people, so the boatman helped me out.

I'm pretty sure everyone saw the betrayal coming as soon as you joined them and realized the game had too many people vying for leadership of your party and it only reaffirmed it once you find out

You were just the worker from day one, succeeding in impossible shit until they didn't need you anymore.

Also, from the heavy Bioshock-esque feeling I was getting, I had a feeling my first partnership would turn sour.

Name checking Longest Journey? Now THAT came out of nowhere.

NameIsRobertPaulson:
Funny incident of a game telegraphing a betrayal, but missing it because of gameplay:

Yeah, I hear yah-

I've seen betrayals a mile away in some games but I am forced to play along. Like in Skyrim, I knew *Thieves Guild Spoiler* that the leader would betray me when he led me to a tomb. Most of the time people send me to do their work, but for this guy to have me come and kill a horse means he wants me gone. Still had to role with it, which felt irritating just knowing I am helping someone that's going to try killing me in a way I have no way of countering (cut scene wise).

I was expecting a betrayal. I wasn't expecting them all to be in on it.

Actually, that isn't quite true. I wasn't expecting a betrayal. I was, however, expecting a twist - I knew we weren't at the end yet, and I knew there was still the Empress' Assassin to take care of. I was expecting an attack on the house, or something like that.

Anyway, put me down as one of those legitimately surprised - or at least, someone who only cottoned on after I'd drunk the drink and experienced a few of those weird blurring moments...

The ever pleasing cutscene railroad. :7

"Oh, Jensen; you men so stupid, teehee."

' all the self-preservation instincts of a cancer-ridden lemming with stocks in THQ.'

Oh god xD

Also yeah, i got very pissed at that scene...

Denamic:

So, what you're saying is that if you do not pay attention to the narrative, the narrative doesn't impact you as much? Wow, that blows my mind.

That's not what I'm saying at all. The most obvious signs of imminent betrayal come from exposition outside the narrative. It's completely possible to overlook them. And the rather lackluster characterization means that the subtlety among your 'allies' isn't particularly well done, so you either know immediately that, somewhere down the line, you're screwed, or you immediately disregard the possibility because it's too obvious.

That's what I'm saying.

Whenever a game character says stuff like "I'm the only one you can trust," and try to make everyone else I meet seem like they're going to stab me in the back, they're the people I know are going are going to betray me.

**Spoileresh Warning* The games that come to mind for me in that regard are BioShock and Dead Space.**

TLJ reference. Brilliant. I was yelling at the screen. Stop, it's a trap, dammit!

That gribbler encounter was pretty stupid. In most cases, April Ryan comes across as pretty intelligent. But in that whole scene, it's so obvious what's going on. It really would have been a lot more believable if the "old woman" wasn't constantly giving it away with her mistakes.

SonOfMethuselah:
I just don't think the devs thought out that betrayal scene at all. I mean, even if you're completely unobservant, and ignore all the optional audio logs and whatnot, that mission where you go in for the Spymaster has absolutely none of the feel of a final, climactic mission. So you just know that there's more stuff coming, and since there aren't any high-priority governmental targets within Dunwall to take out, you have to start to wonder where the story's going.

Except that before that mission even starts they taunt you with the bait that Daud, the man who killed the Empress, is next. It made sense that he would be last because, as an assassin himself, he should be the most difficult target to kill, and they could afford to leave him for last because he's of little political significance.

Anyway, I wasn't terribly surprised that Pendleton turned on me, or perhaps more accurately, could be turned against me, and I was a bit wary of Havelock, but I was surprised that all three of the primary Loyalist conspirators turned on me. I figured one of the of them would turn on me at some point, but not all three. In retrospect, I'm not sure how much sense that makes, but that's what I was feeling at the time.

I was actually kind of hurt that overseer Martin was in on it. Maybe it's just because he seemed like the smartest and most down-to-earth of the bunch, or maybe it's because he won me over with his wit when I freed him from those stocks. And it was his idea to get me out of prison in the first place.

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