Reel Physics: Indiana Jones 4: Crystal Skull - Nuking the Fridge

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SonOfVoorhees:

Sutter Cane:

Kanatatsu:
1. He'd emerge from the fridge a bag of broken bones and blood.

2. The fridge door would not stay closed. He would be propelled out and incinerated.

3. This is silly. Of course a nuclear blast is not survivable by jumping into a fridge, even a fairytale, lead-lined, 700+ pound one.

any numbers to back that up? The show provided numbers and one of the other posters gave numbers, so where are your calculations?

No numbers needed. Drive a car at 90mph and slam into a solid surface without any safety belts or air bags. This means death, hell that would be mildly survivable even with air bags and seat belts. Numbers dont prove anything, after all luck can play a part or even talent. Some people can hold their breath for 5 mins, most cant. So names can prove you can survive without air underwater for 5 mins, but only if you talented and trained your body. 99% of the people on this planet would drown.

Look, Had you said this a week ago, i would have agreed with you, but now that the calculations have been done' and that they seem to be in favor of survivability, you're gonna need something a bit more concrete than "no, they're wrong" to be convincing

SonOfVoorhees:

Sutter Cane:

Kanatatsu:
1. He'd emerge from the fridge a bag of broken bones and blood.

2. The fridge door would not stay closed. He would be propelled out and incinerated.

3. This is silly. Of course a nuclear blast is not survivable by jumping into a fridge, even a fairytale, lead-lined, 700+ pound one.

any numbers to back that up? The show provided numbers and one of the other posters gave numbers, so where are your calculations?

No numbers needed. Drive a car at 90mph and slam into a solid surface without any safety belts or air bags. This means death, hell that would be mildly survivable even with air bags and seat belts. Numbers dont prove anything, after all luck can play a part or even talent. Some people can hold their breath for 5 mins, most cant. So names can prove you can survive without air underwater for 5 mins, but only if you talented and trained your body. 99% of the people on this planet would drown.

I'm not sure if this is comparable to the car crash simply because in a car crash the speed drops straight to 0, but in this case it bounces and deaccelerates over time. Though I do agree that Indy would not survive the overall things simply because him being in the fridge in an awkward position would result in head injury, broken bones etc. that he'd never leave that desert.

Saulkar:

Orbot_Vectorman:

So, could one survive transferring from starship to starship like was shown on Titan A.E. ?

I will answer this for you instead as I have read several scientific articles and magazines on this very subject.

Yes, completely survivable.

If one exhales all of the air out of their lungs they will not rupture during the sudden decompression from gas expansion. The human body however will expand 2 to 3 times its normal volume but because of cartilage one would resemble a body builder and not a balloon, the body can take this with little more than stretch marks and a few lesions.

Furthermore one retains consciousness for roughly 12-15 seconds before blacking out and dieing of oxygen deprivation rough 60-90 seconds later. Additionally one begins to immediate breath again when exposed to an atmosphere. Your blood does not boil because it is already under pressure however in some places in your body it will assume a semi gaseous state however this will not affect its ability to provide at least some oxygen to the places where it needs it.

Aside from the rapid expulsion of gases in your lungs harmlessly frosting the moisture on their surfaces, the body will not freeze as thermal conductivity cannot happen in a vacuum where the particle density is just too low to steal heat.

Titan A.E. got it right on many accounts including K/Corso telling Cale to exhale and the appearance of lesions on his body in the medical bay afterwords.

I never saw Titan ae, but I'm fairly certain that the vacuum would kill you. Any orifice would expel any and all things. And as such you would probably crap out your innards or at least have massive internal hemorrhaging, which is likely to kill you. Not to mention your ears would be destroyed, which doesn't bode well for your brain. And if you don't have some sort of pressure suit, everything should flash into vapor to attempt to equalize pressure. Vacuum is definitely a lower pressure than the vapor pressure of water, which is what the cells in your body are made of. That doesn't sound survivable to me at all, but feel free to correct me

the doom cannon:

Saulkar:

Orbot_Vectorman:

So, could one survive transferring from starship to starship like was shown on Titan A.E. ?

I will answer this for you instead as I have read several scientific articles and magazines on this very subject.

Yes, completely survivable.

If one exhales all of the air out of their lungs they will not rupture during the sudden decompression from gas expansion. The human body however will expand 2 to 3 times its normal volume but because of cartilage one would resemble a body builder and not a balloon, the body can take this with little more than stretch marks and a few lesions.

Furthermore one retains consciousness for roughly 12-15 seconds before blacking out and dieing of oxygen deprivation rough 60-90 seconds later. Additionally one begins to immediate breath again when exposed to an atmosphere. Your blood does not boil because it is already under pressure however in some places in your body it will assume a semi gaseous state however this will not affect its ability to provide at least some oxygen to the places where it needs it.

Aside from the rapid expulsion of gases in your lungs harmlessly frosting the moisture on their surfaces, the body will not freeze as thermal conductivity cannot happen in a vacuum where the particle density is just too low to steal heat.

Titan A.E. got it right on many accounts including K/Corso telling Cale to exhale and the appearance of lesions on his body in the medical bay afterwords.

I never saw Titan ae, but I'm fairly certain that the vacuum would kill you. Any orifice would expel any and all things. And as such you would probably crap out your innards or at least have massive internal hemorrhaging, which is likely to kill you. Not to mention your ears would be destroyed, which doesn't bode well for your brain. And if you don't have some sort of pressure suit, everything should flash into vapor to attempt to equalize pressure. Vacuum is definitely a lower pressure than the vapor pressure of water, which is what the cells in your body are made of. That doesn't sound survivable to me at all, but feel free to correct me

Your skin is resilient enough to cope with zero pressure. You will not explode into a cloud of gore and flesh.
The problem is rapid diffusion from gases out of your blood and lungs into the void. Because you can't really close your airways, this keeps on going until your lungs are empty of content and you lose consciousness when oxygen in blood drops too low. Because the inside of your ear is connected to the outside as far as I know, your eardrum would not explode.
Your eyes would maybe dry out, but again they're resilient enough to cope with it.

http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/970603.html
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=survival-in-space-unprotected-possible

Thedutchjelle:
snip

I completely agree that your skin is plenty resilient since it's only 1 atm of evenly distributed pressure. What I don't agree with is that the rapid depressurization wouldnt cause serious damage. If you completely exhale then fine, your lungs wont be destroyed, I'm good with that. I also agree that your blood wouldn't boil since it's in a closed system. Now if you cut yourself whilst unprotected that's another story, but let's assume you don't. You can't expel the air in your bowels, so that would explosively decompress, and I'm not entirely sure what that would do, but I feel like it would rupture your intestines and possibly your stomach. Obviously I can't back that up at all, so there's no proof one way or another, just speculation. Then there is also the issue of your eyes. According to the scientific american article, they would just swell and cause temporary blindness.
My main issue with these animal studies is that they were done under gradual depressurization. It's very difficult to simulate instant depressurization like what would occur in space, and the article even conceded that injuries sustained by faster depressurization were significantly worse and carried higher risks of death. Remember that the pressure difference has near instant onset, not gradual, so all of the problems caused by depressurization would be magnified. If you could somehow decompress slowly and then float off in space unprotected, then sure, you could be up and about without permanent damage. But what happens if you instantly decompress?

Saulkar:

the doom cannon:

but feel free to correct me

Nah, I will just give some links.
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/970603.html
http://www.geoffreylandis.com/vacuum.html
http://www.damninteresting.com/outer-space-exposure/
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/711/if-you-were-thrown-into-the-vacuum-of-space-with-no-space-suit-would-you-explode

CAPTCHA: black coffee-I need some.

Taken straight from one of your articles: "Note that this discussion covers the effect of vacuum exposure only" meaning that the effects of the actual decompression itself are not considered. The same article goes into effects of rapid decompression in various orifices, and notes that rapid decompression could in fact cause serious problems.
My argument was not that you explode, nor was it that your blood would boil. It was that you would still die unless you were under extremely controlled conditions in which you could 1) exhale, 2) depressurize relatively slowly. Since I didn't see the movie in question, I assumed the conditions were rapid decompression, in which case swelling and such would not be the only problem.

the doom cannon:

Saulkar:

the doom cannon:

but feel free to correct me

Nah, I will just give some links.
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/970603.html
http://www.geoffreylandis.com/vacuum.html
http://www.damninteresting.com/outer-space-exposure/
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/711/if-you-were-thrown-into-the-vacuum-of-space-with-no-space-suit-would-you-explode

CAPTCHA: black coffee-I need some.

Taken straight from one of your articles: "Note that this discussion covers the effect of vacuum exposure only" meaning that the effects of the actual decompression itself are not considered. The same article goes into effects of rapid decompression in various orifices, and notes that rapid decompression could in fact cause serious problems.
My argument was not that you explode, nor was it that your blood would boil. It was that you would still die unless you were under extremely controlled conditions in which you could 1) exhale, 2) depressurize relatively slowly. Since I didn't see the movie in question, I assumed the conditions were rapid decompression, in which case swelling and such would not be the only problem.

Oi. A couple of the articles mention explosive decompression and the effects it would cause. Furthermore they have tested it on chimps (while incredibly cruel) and small animals show that it is survivable. This includes the bends (nitrogen bubbles in the blood stream), the possibility of ruptured eardrums, frosting of the lungs and orifices, gas pressure in the digestive track risking damage, and temporary blindness. It is not quite the same as coming from a pressure much higher than one atmosphere (60 meters underwater) to a normal pressure. Furthermore a man lost conscious roughly 14 or so seconds after his suit was ruptured in a pressure chamber, you do not lose consciousness that fast from rapid decompression. While it was not true hard vacuum the loss in pressure was just as extreme.

the doom cannon:

Thedutchjelle:
snip

I completely agree that your skin is plenty resilient since it's only 1 atm of evenly distributed pressure. What I don't agree with is that the rapid depressurization wouldnt cause serious damage. If you completely exhale then fine, your lungs wont be destroyed, I'm good with that. I also agree that your blood wouldn't boil since it's in a closed system. Now if you cut yourself whilst unprotected that's another story, but let's assume you don't. You can't expel the air in your bowels, so that would explosively decompress, and I'm not entirely sure what that would do, but I feel like it would rupture your intestines and possibly your stomach. Obviously I can't back that up at all, so there's no proof one way or another, just speculation. Then there is also the issue of your eyes. According to the scientific american article, they would just swell and cause temporary blindness.
My main issue with these animal studies is that they were done under gradual depressurization. It's very difficult to simulate instant depressurization like what would occur in space, and the article even conceded that injuries sustained by faster depressurization were significantly worse and carried higher risks of death. Remember that the pressure difference has near instant onset, not gradual, so all of the problems caused by depressurization would be magnified. If you could somehow decompress slowly and then float off in space unprotected, then sure, you could be up and about without permanent damage. But what happens if you instantly decompress?

I'm not entirly certain of the effects of the gas in your guts. I don't think it's sufficient to cause bodily harm, atleast not to the point of death. If it's present it would probably search the easiest way out - through the normal entry/exit. Just like your skin, the celllayers of your gut are most likely resilient enough to cope with that.

I agree though that instant depressurisation would be bad - i think the shock alone would be quite disorienting on a person.

Didn't one of the articles speak of a engineer working in a near vacuum environment when his suit started leaking? I think that's the closest you can get to instant depressurisation - he lost consciousness within half a minute or so after the leak started.
I think it's impossible to have instant-decompression. Even if you put a guy in an airlock and then open the doors, it's still going to take time for the room to rid itself of it's air.

I have a famous scene you should tackle, although it's not really physics so much as it's biology and/or chemistry.

The adrenaline shot scene from Pulp Fiction.

I think the show stated that the fridge could not be flying that far/fast. If that isn't possible, then shouldn't Indian Jones be dead since that is part of what saved him? Shouldn't he be crushed under the house or too close to the explosion or something?

I still don't believe its possible. Some how the fridge is indestructible and Indiana is indestructible inside the fridge. But I since don't have numbers to back that up, I can only pick out issues the video didn't seem to address. It seemed kinda one sided.

Best episode yet! The humour really worked well in this one.

Ukomba:
Of all the various pronunciations and accents there are, why does Nuclear annoy people so much?

Probably because they were subjected to 8 years of George Dubya Bush, und his nucular ways.

Orbot_Vectorman:
So, from what you guys showed, even I could survive being nuked if I'm in a fridge? Cool, now where to find a lead lined fridge and a place to get nuked! sounds like a thrill ride.

So, could one survive transferring from starship to starship like was shown on Titan A.E. ?

According to this, yeah, Cale can do that: http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/970603.html

EDIT: awww...ninja'ed

Also, I know the show is intended for manly US audiences, but it gets waaaaaaaaaay confusing and dizzying to shift between metric and imperial measures every couple of seconds. Chose one and stick with it throughout. Because most of the things talked about are in the metric system I'd go with that one, maybe ony translating the final results into imperial system, not every individual step of the equations.

I enjoyed the Fallout New Vegas that took a shot at this scene.

Fat_Hippo:

Ukomba:
Of all the various pronunciations and accents there are, why does Nuclear annoy people so much?

Probably because they were subjected to 8 years of George Dubya Bush, und his nucular ways.

Sorry, but that seems a little deranged.

Ukomba:

Fat_Hippo:

Ukomba:
Of all the various pronunciations and accents there are, why does Nuclear annoy people so much?

Probably because they were subjected to 8 years of George Dubya Bush, und his nucular ways.

Sorry, but that seems a little deranged.

Maybe it is, but I'm gonna bet that Americans had to listen to him say that more than just a couple of times, in all his speeches of Iraq and its "Weapons of Mass Destruction." And since the Second Gulf War and George W Bush have pretty much become a symbol of things going down shit creek since the turn of the millennium, this particular pronunciation seems to have gained a strong negative connotation. Just a theory, on my part.

Plus, it really does sound quite silly.

I think you might fare better in a fridge than anywhere else, but they shouldn't have thrown it in the air like that. It made the whole thing look really stupid.

Henkie36, about Sunshine: I think they made that part pretty well. You need to remember that the human skin and body can sustain some really high thermal abuse for a short time. If you can breathe out the air so that your chest doesn't explode, I'd say you can survive a few seconds in space. I'm not an expert though.

Here's a good topic, which really frustrated the heck out of me: The inverted flight scene in "The Flight". For something that look so plausible, I say it's downright impossible. I think that the only planes that could attempt to stop a dive by inverting are the ones with mirrored wing sections that rely on angles of attack and engines to fly, such as fighter and aerobatic planes. People tend to point out the Alaska Flight 261 incident on which the movie was based, but in reality they never stopped descending. Their nose never climbed above the horizon, but even if it had, the plane would need to reach a really huge angle to be able to get enough vertical component thrust to counteract inertia, gravity and the inverted lift of the main wings (although the latter is less than in normal flight). Worse, since the elevator works as a force couple differential with the lift of the wings, a jammed elevator in an intermediate position will only point the plane down until the increased airspeed raises the lift enough to balance the tail, so the plane never goes completely nose down (it did in the Alaska flight because it broke, but not in the movie). This actually means that inverting it does absolutely nothing to raise the nose back up. If it does raise a bit, it's from the turbulence at the tail which nullifies the elevator action. And they keep messing around with the landing gear and the brakes. The landing gear actually creates a vertical couple and pitches the nose down MORE. Using the brakes would work while inverted to mess up the inverted lift, but while flying normally, brakes just increase your drop speed and allow you to maintain a nose up attitude while descending. They limit the speed by increasing angle of attack. And because they decrease lift, they would make the elevator lift of the tail even worse. So using them in a dive actually makes the dive WORSE, drops your nose even more and makes you hit the ground faster. I'll leave the rest to you guys.

Yeah I never really had as big of a problem than most others seemed to here. The flying part was pretty ridiculous but as long as there's a decent enough distance between you and the blast then a lead line fridge is about as good as you'd hope to find. Using some parallel fiction to support it I recall reading a Tom Clancy book where a smaller grade nuke is detonated at a sporting stadium, and in the aftermath they find some survivors, a bit cooked but alive, that were in some sort of heavily lined news truck just outside.

You know what else wasn't bullshit? The cross-dimensional/whatever aliens. Now yes it's bullshit, but in terms of Indiana Jones where we've already seen the Ark of Covenant and the Holy Grail the movie actually played Crystal Skulls in the same manner. Most people probably never head about them but if you actually look them up they were a thing that became fairly popular during the time the movie was set by new ageist types and who believed the skulls had psychic powers and were left behind by inter-dimensional aliens. Considering that this was the Cold War so the bad guys were Soviets, not Nazi's, and both sides sunk time and money into psychic research and development, it was actually a very good concept to use for an older Indy movie

Dissenting opinion:

"The lead would liquefy," says Professor E.L. Mathie, a scientist who researches intermediate energy nuclear physics at the University of Regina.

That's because the immediate damage caused by a nuclear explosion at close range is by heat and shockwaves, not radiation.

Had Indy been further away, the force from the explosion would have had time to dissipate, and the fridge would have protected him from harmful gamma rays.

But at such close range, Professor Jones would definitely not have survived.

Not trying to be argumentative or anything, but it's handy to have an alternative viewpoint to consider.
(The tumbling high-speed crash didn't bother me so much, because, well, I watch auto racing. I've seen wilder rides than that.)

You guys really should have done the Shia LaBeouf vine swinging scene. It's so god damned ridiculous, it'd never hold water.

AlexanderPeregrine:
Colby, it's pronounced New Klee Er, not New Cool Er. You sound like Sarah Palin.

My A level physics teacher had a squadron of paper aeroplanes that he would throw at us if we said (and this is how he spelled it) 'Nookyoolar'. The guy was an absolute laugh though, so nobody really minded getting a paper plane to the back of the head or the face every once in a while.

Father Time:
I have a famous scene you should tackle, although it's not really physics so much as it's biology and/or chemistry.

The adrenaline shot scene from Pulp Fiction.

Yeah, that's not physics at all. That probably comes under pharamacology.

Yeah, I didn't have a problem with that scene, it actually seemed a pretty good place as any to shelter from a nuclear blast...

UNTIL the fridge ended up flying FURTHER than the blast and even overtaking it. That's pushing plausibility into loony-toon road-runner physics. It's just the dumbest shot in the world, the fridge flying straight over the Russians' heads, ignoring gravity with no sort of curving trajectory and ahead of the blast wave.

This scene just needed one change, the fridge does get thrown, but it only gets thrown into a nearby trench or hardened bunker the military was testing, one full of Soldiers in NBC gear and gas masks who quickly get him a gas mask when he pops out. Because they apparently did that, they'd put soldiers dangerously close to nuclear explosions to get them an idea of what they'd have to face in a nuclear war with their trenches and bunker defences.

AlexanderPeregrine:
Colby, it's pronounced New Klee Er, not New Cool Er. You sound like Sarah Palin.

"Nucular" is actually an accepted variation in american pronunciation. Toe-may-toe Toe-mah-toe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nucular

I mean how many times do EXPERTS in the field of nuclear physics have to pronounce it a certain way before it becomes THE way.

Language is not fixed. There is no such thing as a "Widespread mispronunciation" if it's widespread - especially amongst people who are most knowledgeable about the subject - then it's accepted variance. At least in american parlance.

You can show a far-right politician ridiculed for her lack of intellect saying "Nucular" but then I can show Nobel Peace Price winner, uber-Liberal president like Jimmy Carter repeatedly say "Nucular" and his profession before he got into politics was working on a submarine looking after nuclear reactors. He LEARNED from the experts in the industry to pronounce it "Nucular". I remind you that America practically pioneered the practical applications of nuclear technology, they made the first nuclear reactors and the first nuclear bombs.

____

Really, saying American Physicists pronounce "Nuclear" wrong is a bit like saying Liverpudlians pronounce "Liverpool" wrong.

Fat_Hippo:

Ukomba:
Of all the various pronunciations and accents there are, why does Nuclear annoy people so much?

Probably because they were subjected to 8 years of George Dubya Bush, und his nucular ways.

More like 70 years of the very people who INVENTED nuclear reactors and nuclear bombs pronouncing it as "nucular".

President Jimmy Carter, you know, the Nobel Peace Prize winner? He pronounced it "nucular" before W Bush was even born.

"noo-Klee-arr" may be semantically correct, but all the time words' pronunciation differ from their strict semantic pronunciation. For example almost no one pronounces "homosexual" correctly and it's a far worse infraction as their mispronunciation implies it's the "homo" from the root of "Homo Sapien" rather than the same as "Homophone" which is a completely different kind of Homo, former means "of man" and the latter means "the same, alike".

Pronouncing nuclear as "Nucular" doesn't imply anything else.

It's my pet peeve that people (usually my fellow Brits, to my shame) ignorantly pounce on this variation in pronunciation as anything untoward.

Captcha: AND THAT'S THE WAY IT IS

SonOfVoorhees:

No numbers needed. Drive a car at 90mph and slam into a solid surface without any safety belts or air bags. This means death, hell that would be mildly survivable even with air bags and seat belts. Numbers dont prove anything, after all luck can play a part or even talent. Some people can hold their breath for 5 mins, most cant. So names can prove you can survive without air underwater for 5 mins, but only if you talented and trained your body. 99% of the people on this planet would drown.

Does not compute.

The blast is parallel to the ground, the fridge would be propelled parallel to the ground, it would not decelerate instantly unless if it was intersecting with the ground close to perpendicular with the ground. You understand what "perpendicular" means?

Cars are can be CONSTANTLY coming into a contact with a solid surface at 90 miles per hour, it's called "driving" and you don't need seatbelts for that... speed doesn't kill, it's the sudden stop that does. In this risky case the fridge wouldn't be slammed against a vertical cliff face, it skitters over the ground and even down an incline. The declaration would or could be slow... disregarding how the fridge could overtake the blast wave, that's wrong.

Realise after WWII companies that had been making tanks moved straight into producing consumer good like fridges, they'd over-engineer things and not give a damn about weight because they had machinery for thick gauge metal, that's what they used.

Numbers dont prove anything,

Yes they do. You are using a computer which is ENTIRELY BASED on numbers proving things.

after all luck can play a part or even talent.

Those are factored as numbers as well in probability as well as accuracy and precision.

A person holding their breath for 5 minutes is an example of lowered metabolism, and I mean ALL aspects of metabolism, not baseline metabolic rate as well as maximum oxygen saturation in system as well as mental tolerance of low oxygen to brain. Many people without training survive 5 minutes without breathing, but they pass out from the stress after 30-60 seconds and unless oxygen put in their system again they are dead within 5. This is again, all numbers, but you have to realise the quantified aspects are there whether they are immediatley apparent to you or not.

Techno Squidgy:

Father Time:
I have a famous scene you should tackle, although it's not really physics so much as it's biology and/or chemistry.

The adrenaline shot scene from Pulp Fiction.

Yeah, that's not physics at all. That probably comes under pharamacology.

I know but I still want to see them tackle it.

It's not like it's something the Mythbusters could try.

Treblaine:

Fat_Hippo:

Ukomba:
Of all the various pronunciations and accents there are, why does Nuclear annoy people so much?

Probably because they were subjected to 8 years of George Dubya Bush, und his nucular ways.

More like 70 years of the very people who INVENTED nuclear reactors and nuclear bombs pronouncing it as "nucular".

President Jimmy Carter, you know, the Nobel Peace Prize winner? He pronounced it "nucular" before W Bush was even born.

"noo-Klee-arr" may be semantically correct, but all the time words' pronunciation differ from their strict semantic pronunciation. For example almost no one pronounces "homosexual" correctly and it's a far worse infraction as their mispronunciation implies it's the "homo" from the root of "Homo Sapien" rather than the same as "Homophone" which is a completely different kind of Homo, former means "of man" and the latter means "the same, alike".

Pronouncing nuclear as "Nucular" doesn't imply anything else.

It's my pet peeve that people (usually my fellow Brits, to my shame) ignorantly pounce on this variation in pronunciation as anything untoward.

Captcha: AND THAT'S THE WAY IT IS

Those were some interesting facts, and I thank you for them.

But there must still be some psychological reason this particular pronunciation of nuclear seems to provoke such an aggressive reaction from people, when as you mentioned, people are ignorant or ambivalent of other equally semantically incorrect ones. And for an extremely politically charged word such as nuclear, the context in which and by whom it has been said, even in recent times, should not be discounted.

Or hell, maybe I'm just over-analyzing this to death, and it's just a dumb coincidence people enjoy using this as a way of expressing their intellectual superiority.

And there I go again...

Fat_Hippo:

Those were some interesting facts, and I thank you for them.

But there must still be some psychological reason this particular pronunciation of nuclear seems to provoke such an aggressive reaction from people, when as you mentioned, people are ignorant or ambivalent of other equally semantically incorrect ones. And for an extremely politically charged word such as nuclear, the context in which and by whom it has been said, even in recent times, should not be discounted.

Or hell, maybe I'm just over-analyzing this to death, and it's just a dumb coincidence people enjoy using this as a way of expressing their intellectual superiority.

And there I go again...

I think it's little more than Anti-American prejudice, and similarly a kind of prejudice by ignorant Americans who think only dumb republicans use such a pronunciation when extremely intelligent liberals have used it long before, such as Jimmy Carter.

People who attempt to assert a kind of intellectual superiority by blind assertion that "It's pronounced noo-klee-arr" do the precise opposite. They are really covering up for their own lack of intellect yet insecurity that they should be intellectual.

The problem is with these grammer snipers is the host of Reel Physics have probably got a physics education and learned about physics from a physics graduate at least... where they would have picked up the "Nucular" pronunciation. And there in lies in the intellectual inferiority complex, they have a good physics education and they see they don't, but they'll snipe at the one thing they think they can get them at... pedantic pronunciation.

I think you guys should do a harlem shake at the end of your next outtakes...

Okay, so even if he could have survived the blast, how exactly did the fridge? Why was it the only thing thrown that far (there were no other fridges thrown at all), and why did it not get shredded when it rolled across the ground?

Surely, the real problem here is the unpredictable nature of his injuries. Upon landing, we clearly see the fridge land multiple times at high speeds (I know it's decelerating, but it visibly hits the ground with tremendous force several times after the initial impact), including at least once on its end.

I don't know what your exact measurements are of survivability here, nor do I know what level of injury you define as survivable, but it looks like it would take an Act of God to prevent Indy from hitting his head on any of those crashes, not to mention the possibility of his neck breaking.

The historical precedent set means that the initial force of the explosion wouldn't necessarily be lethal, but I see no reason to think that the multiple impacts wouldn't cause lethal injury, since he's not wearing a helmet.

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