Reel Physics: Skyfall - Bonded Train Cars

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Skyfall - Bonded Train Cars

Colby and Jason cover Skyfall and James Bond's attempt to revolutionize train travel.

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Hey everyone!
We've got a heck of A Dele for you this week! *ba dump*

It's the latest James Bond for you guys to check out. It's a funny episode for sure.
As always, send your suggestions in to reelphysics@escapistmag.com or post here on Facebook or on the forums and let us know what you want us to cover in future episodes.

Chime in this week and tell me how many episodes you have seen and whether you have been with us the whole time or whether you just recently discovered us.

If you like the show, remember to like it and share it to help other people discover it!

Thanks as always!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

Multi-track drifting, anyone?

Hmmm, drag coefficient of a brick should be a t-shirt somehow.....

Unless you guys did some hidden episodes somewhere I've seen them all. And as usual this was both informative and amusing.

But... I'm going to be nit-picky and point out a mistake anyway ;), Turkey is in Asia, not Europe.

Rakor:
Multi-track drifting, anyone?

Hmmm, drag coefficient of a brick should be a t-shirt somehow.....

Multi-track drifting, eh?


Also, someone apparantly made a game about it...

Eleuthera:
Unless you guys did some hidden episodes somewhere I've seen them all. And as usual this was both informative and amusing.

But... I'm going to be nit-picky and point out a mistake anyway ;), Turkey is in Asia, not Europe.

Officially, that's open to debate as they do want to join the EU and it's seriously being considered. In school I was mostly told that West of Istanbul is Europe, East of Istanbul is Asia, but of course, that was oversimplified. Kinda the way Russia is considered part of Europe when the majority of its landmass is actually geographically in Asia.

I'm pretty sure when that air pipe separated the flat beds, and possibly the rest of the train too, should have come to a grinding halt pretty quick. Train air brakes are designed to be fail safe- as I understand it the air pressure keeps the brakes OFF, the brakes are applied by essentially venting the system.

Mindyou, not as bad as the previous train based folly involving a 200mph train on a shonky American freight railroad. Can't help but feel in the rush to use equations, there's some physics that you're missing!

Oh man, can't help but love this more and more each week. But I have to feel you missed an opportunity to green-screen yourself as startled passengers when the arm crashed through the roof.

Well since I am from Turkey, I am obliged to express my displeasure at the gross depiction of our hard-working public trasportation units. That being said, I find your bloopers and "unrelated" pictures to be more entertaining than the actual video since math is like French to me. Cool to hear, but would be cooler if I understood it. Anyway keep up the good work guys. Hope I will catch up someboday.

I really, REALLY shouldn't have done a google image search for "bear in drag"....

Urh:
I really, REALLY shouldn't have done a google image search for "bear in drag"....

LOL!!! This really made me laugh about the entire thing all over again! Thanks for that!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

I've been watching the show since the first episode. It's quite entertaining and informative at the same time, so keep 'em coming! If you missed it in the 'State of the Union' comments, here's a avatar gif of Colby and Jason in the back of the car!

image

Jbowdown:
I've been watching the show since the first episode. It's quite entertaining and informative at the same time, so keep 'em coming! If you missed it in the 'State of the Union' comments, here's a avatar gif of Colby and Jason in the back of the car!

image

I apparently did miss that!
Congratulations, you have won the internet for today! AWESOME!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

Anakinnnn:

Jbowdown:
I've been watching the show since the first episode. It's quite entertaining and informative at the same time, so keep 'em coming! If you missed it in the 'State of the Union' comments, here's a avatar gif of Colby and Jason in the back of the car!

image

I apparently did miss that!
Congratulations, you have won the internet for today! AWESOME!

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

Put it as the official ReelPhysics avatar

I'm kind of dissapointed you didn't put an actual bear in drag.

I thought that the ReelPhysics part would be that it would have torn off instantly, not that it wouldn't tear off ata all.

Urh:
I really, REALLY shouldn't have done a google image search for "bear in drag"....

No! GOD NO! Why didn't I listen? I just had to go check after you said that? Ugh.

I swear the outtakes get weirder every week :D

wackelpudding:
I swear the outtakes get weirder every week :D

You haven't seen nothing yet... wait until NEXT week! LOL! It's something completely different than we have done so far.

Jason Dean
REEL PHYSICS

Al_:
I'm pretty sure when that air pipe separated the flat beds, and possibly the rest of the train too, should have come to a grinding halt pretty quick. Train air brakes are designed to be fail safe- as I understand it the air pressure keeps the brakes OFF, the brakes are applied by essentially venting the system.

You beat me to it. There were two things about the calculations that seemed to be erroneous assumptions. The first is using the full drag of the flatbed, cars and excavator. Most of this surface area should have been in the slipstream of the passenger car thus reducing the drag greatly. (Of course, since that just worked in favor of the scene, I can see why they would have calculated it this way as a "worse case scenario".) But the brakes would have changed things drastically if the car were allowed to pull far enough apart to break the connection or if the break line was damaged by one of the bullets that uncoupled the cars. As soon as they started to lose pressure, the brakes should have been applied and stopped the flatbed car.

Haha, that's so cool. I always love it when movie makers completely underestimate just how durable the stuff we build modern society with often is. Now I want to see an entire train's worth of train cars held together ENTIRELY by ROOF-PUNCTURING EXCAVATORS. :D

17 already, my the young'uns grow so quickly! Congrats, guys.
Always informative.

Now, I need to find out what to call Cavators from now on. I am behind the times

AlwaysPractical:

Eleuthera:
Unless you guys did some hidden episodes somewhere I've seen them all. And as usual this was both informative and amusing.

But... I'm going to be nit-picky and point out a mistake anyway ;), Turkey is in Asia, not Europe.

Officially, that's open to debate as they do want to join the EU and it's seriously being considered. In school I was mostly told that West of Istanbul is Europe, East of Istanbul is Asia, but of course, that was oversimplified. Kinda the way Russia is considered part of Europe when the majority of its landmass is actually geographically in Asia.

No Superman movie? I am Super Disappointed!

I'm going to suggest the Kinetic Bombardment from the new G.I. Joe movie. The math and physics should be straightforward enough for the viewers. There's also some basis in reality there. I guess you could calculate how much damage their weapon could actually do, and then figure out how big a cylinder they would need in order to level London. Something along those lines anyway. Or make the cylinder out of different materials to find one most viable (a la Helicarrier). A friend of mine did some calculations and the numbers come out pretty crazy.

I called shenanigans on this when I first saw it in the cinema. Once the seal on those air brake couplings is broken the whole train would stop. It's been an established safety feature in trains since the 1800s.

Eleuthera:
But... I'm going to be nit-picky and point out a mistake anyway ;), Turkey is in Asia, not Europe.

I'm going to be double picky. Turkey's a transcontinental country; it's in both Europe and Asia ;)

Cool its nice for it to not be realistic in a way that wouldn't have made the scene less cool. As in they could've just left the train held together by the digger and the story would've progressed the same. Unlike a motorbike from a roof top.

Love this show! Bloody brilliant, but very unexpected. Usually when they incorporate 'reel' physics into movies, it's to overblow something. To underuse something is interesting.

'Roof Railings', what do you mean by that? 1stly, the footage doesn't appear to show any steel in the roof of a rail car.

Passenger rail cars need to be light weight, and the one in the footage appears to be no exception (steel is HEAVY), the roof structure is clearly made up of non metallic panel board sections with some kind of thin metal sheeting for outer skins.

The failure mechanism of the roof structure is clearly brittle fracture (as shown by the gash through the roof rather than any bending or stretching) with the yield/buckling failure of the metallic outer skin. As they mentioned last week, steel (at room temp) yields, and there is no sign of any yielding in the footage, which would be shown by a bar being stretched back through the cabin.

Thats my main engineering gripes with this episode.
Now for the physics part. ACCELERATION force was NEGLECTED! As soon as the train carriages were disconnected, the locomotive, under reduced load, would begin to accelerate away, even if not by much, a small change in velocity at bond's end, with the immense weight of the excavator, cars and carriage would impart even more force when he tries to grab on.

Q: "Wait, so I could push a rail car?"
A: Not from rest, but if one was already moving, and all you were doing was maintaining its current velocity, theoretically you might have enough strength.

I've been watching from the beginning, even linked some episodes to my physics teacher relative so she would have something to show her class at the end of term. I get lost in the math most of the time but that is more because I find it difficult to follow what's happening unless I'm actually doing the calculations myself, (I have the same problem in lectures)

You guys have lead me to many interesting engineering/science things that I otherwise wouldn't have known about!

Congrats guys! keep em coming!

yay! metric tons ftw! You actually listened!

Proverbial Jon:
I called shenanigans on this when I first saw it in the cinema. Once the seal on those air brake couplings is broken the whole train would stop. It's been an established safety feature in trains since the 1800s...

While it may have been the passenger rail, freight is still to this day using locomotives and carriages that use air pressure to apply the brakes! Remember the CSX 8888 incident in 2001! Had the brakes on the carriages required air pressure to release then the train would not have gone anywhere until the air line was connected!

OT: Good episode as usual. Loving the bloopers. Look forward to the next one

pretzil:
'Roof Railings', what do you mean by that? 1stly, the footage doesn't appear to show any steel in the roof of a rail car..

I think they mean the thin(ish) metal bars you see running parallel to the roof in the clip. As for the rest, well, it was REEL Physics after all. They wanted to make it look cool for the Cameras.

I've been watching this show since it came on here and it's one of my favourites on the Escapist now :)

nice video, seems legit.

one small note though for you guys and anyone else who cares
if you tear metal it becomes EXTREMELY fragile. you're applying force as a sheer load across the
small sections you've carved out

practical demonstration, take some alloy kitchen foil and poke your finger through it
it's pretty strong right?

secondly, take a sharp object and poke a hole in it, then tear from that hole
see how much weaker it is, the whole mesh of the object is not re-enforcing the structure so it is very compromised it peels and the only failure area is the edges of the cut, which you are applying a rotating sheer force to
( the metal rolls up, gets pinched and cut )

the rest is more to do with the fold/bend resistance strength of the metal, which is quite minimal. i can bend a car body panel by hand, for example and i have relatively average upper body strength
and that's a similar thickness to the roofing panel as presented in the clip..

so,
given the original hole made by the Cat, i'm quite sure 4000lb would tear the seams of the cut
the damage seriously looks legit considering the forces involved
until you include the interior structure, but even then it doesn't look strong
this material is thin sheet that's chemically ( rusty, thin and flaky )
and structurally compromised by a hole made by a cat

I agree it wouldn't rip the whole back off unless it was quite badly weathered and UV weakened
( the thing is a rustbucket as you pointed out. )
as the welding and material seams would provide a layer of re-enforcement
you'd probably just end up with a hole where the bucket was, quite convenient for bond!

I'm now tempted to -

<remembers the multiple meanings of the word "bear">

- NOT interested in Googling "bear in drag".

OT: Fun episode! I also endorse using the State of Union gif as the new official logo.

lacktheknack:
OT: Fun episode! I also endorse using the State of Union gif as the new official logo.

Done!

Anakinnnn:

lacktheknack:
OT: Fun episode! I also endorse using the State of Union gif as the new official logo.

Done!

My day has been made so hard... you guys are great!

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