Xbox? Done.

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MovieBob:
The goal is to make the customer dependant[sic] on the company, not the other way around.

Put that way, it doesn't sound all that different from the drug trade.
They get you hooked into their system, and the only way to keep what you've paid for, to avoid the crash, is to pay for more.

themilo504:
My biggest fear is that one day steam will disappear, taking away most of my game collection

crackfool:
For all the outrage on Xbox One games being "services, not products", there is very little when it comes to Steam, a retailer that has been selling "services" that exist only at the whim of a single company for the past few years.

There is a significant difference that Steam can't actually destroy our games. They can try, but If Steam would go under, your games would wait for you at the site of the sailing ship that's flag shapes x-bones.

But if this Xbone would would fail, or even if it would peacefully get retired, the exclusive games from it would literally disappear from the face of Earth. No one would be physically able to play Xbone games any more. Gone.

I'm not going to buy XBOX One because of how you cannot own YOUR purchases.

"This would effectively turn digital entertainment into the equivalent of a pet hamster that's been genetically engineered to only survive on food available from one specific store (and don't you dare think that PetSmart aren't dumping money into research for exactly that right now) ."

Did you know most corn or maize or whatever you call it in the US comes from seeds that have been mutated to NOT produce viable seeds? Farmers NEED to buy new seeds EACH year now, from ONE company. YES: A few years ago *CORN* was turned into a SERVICE, Bob!!! One that you need basically subscribe to if you want to make DAMNED food!!!

Google "Monsanto Terminator Seeds" for more...
(Great name though, as they are just as evil and uncaring about humanity as any T-1000)

This seems like people are hiding from the real issue here and that is the degradation of property in any sense. Many will point out that we still have the works of Shakespeare with us but few recognize that there were plenty of other playwrights in his time that he have nothing from anymore. Of course, we can all draw our preferred analogy (I think the used car market is the preferred on those wishing to have meaningful disks and GPS systems are the preferred analogy of those liking the licencing model). When we get down to it, we have to realize that all things are ephemeral.

We do not live in a world where we simply accumulate wealth (in any sense of the word). Things decay, get used and wear out. Whether we are facing the inevitability of the growth of entropy or the vagaries of corporate whim, things fall apart and we lose them over time. If you buy a house and simply live in it for twenty years, it may well lose value (unless the market has done some crazy crap) with the effects of weather, termites, a shifting ground and human traffic. A house made by a crap developer will deteriorate faster. Further, expectations in a home may change over time. People now want granite rather than wood counter-tops and hardwood floors are back in style now rather than carpeting.

The connection here is that art, as much as anything, decays. Most of it we lose over time. Some we preserve and reprint in order for others to be able to experience. Just as one can fairly easily have access to the complete works of Shakespeare, we will likely preserve some form of pacman as long as there are people to play it. This loss is inevitable, no matter how hard we try to stop it.

So now MS is selling games as licences. They are intentionally putting an artificial limit on the use of the intellectual property. I won't deny that it's a money grab but the answer is simple here. If this model does not work, MS will fail in this endeavor. However, let me suggest a different line of thought.

I've always played games on both consoles and PCs. I have had, in chronological order, a Apple IIe, an NES, a gameboy, an SNES, a Pentium based PC, a Pentium II based PC, a PS2, a Pentium 4 based laptop, 360, Wii, PS3, a Core 2 Duo based PC and a i7 based PC (current). That makes for 11 machines that were primarily used for gaming. When I got the NES, I stopped playing my games on the IIe and when I got the SNES I stopped playing on the NES. The gameboy never really interested me and the Pentium II was a fairly straight up replacement for the older Pentium. The SNES died when I got the PS2 and I gave the SNES games away to a friend. The 360 and PS3 replaced the ps2 and the laptop replaced the pentium 2 based machine. This keeps going till today when I only have the PS3 (mostly for blurays and netflix) and my i7 based machine. I have bought Baldur's Gate II, Morrowind and Oblivion on three separate occasions each and never once was I upset that I was buying them again.

Back in the day, I spent hours playing ExciteBike on the NES. It was one of the first games with a level creator built in. I remember playing it fondly however, I have no desire to go back and play it again. There are few games that I do have a desire to play again and most of those are still somehow available to me (still trying to find a way to play A Link to the Past in a satisfying way, but whatever). There are some who may wish to desperately hold on to everything they ever spent money on but I don't think this is as big a group as it's members may believe.

Yes what MS is doing is a power/money grab. Yes it's for perfectly greedy reasons. Yes it will screw with some gamers and some stores. However, I don't think it's going to matter. People buy consoles so that playing video games can be simple and the console business has already lost that portion of the market to tablets. With iOS devices dominating simple easy to play games, there isn't much room left for consoles anyhow, so they are trying to edge in on Steam's market: the more tech savvy gamers who want a more complex game to begin with. This is likely to fail also. Why would I bother with a PS4 or a X1 when I can have Steam and gog where I get access to titles old and new, by big publishers and indie devs. If MS or Sony want to sell me on a machine for the living room TV, it needs to provide something none of these "next gen" consoles are. I want all my TV streamed with everything in the quality of the film it was made on. I want fewer boxes and fewer remote controls for my tv. I want better quality sound for my high-end stereo system. Gaming is nice and all but I have a much better PC for that in a room better suited to gaming. Ownership vs licencing doesn't matter.

They all want to sell me another box but I simply want fewer boxes. I don't need to own a single game. I just want to enjoy playing them.

I see a solution to this problem, if you'd kindly listen (read 'read'): we fold our arms until they stop being twats. Simple as that. They want the customer to depend on them, we cut off their income (which comes from our desire to play games), so, yeah, basically a boycott. We have to remind them that money in business is like pussy in a stereotypical relationship: she (who has it) makes the rules, and he (who wants to get it) abides by the rules, otherwise he won't get it.

The way Bob put it, if we want to keep the games we like, we better make damn sure that their makers are well-fed and won't go bankrupt, otherwise we're in for a world of pain! The idea that gamers shiver at the thought of their beloved games dying because they failed to maintain the company that made them shows how low they think of us. We have to prove them wrong, we have to show them that this shit will not fly!

Seriously, the solution is in your hands/pockets/wallets/cards, and all you have to do is keep it to yourself. Buy the video games whose existence is independent of the makers' financial well-being, seek out new ways to entertain yourself, until the companies that want to make you their little bitch beg for forgiveness or wither and die, giving room to newer, purer game companies!

Please excuse the preachy tone.

50 points to Ravenclaw Mr.Chipman.

At the end of the day the issue with XbO is the sheer contempt it seems to be bringing to the consumers. Loathed to acknowledge the mass of nerds that have traditionally made up its player base they seem to be telling us to bugger off.

I got used to the idea that gaming not only doesn't want my business but rather seems to actively resent my presence among its consumer base as a relic of an age it is now ashamed of a generation ago, fine.

So, this club I am a part of exists?

I back up and store data semi-obsessively for the expressed purpose of preservation.

So, this club I am a part of, exists?

Well, I agree with the title not described in the article. The Xbox is done. I love technology. But this technology is clearly being used at the detriment of the consumer. I can agree with technology, but not every use for it.

Also, you say futurist. Perhaps the more accurate word for what you describe would be "extropian", though.

In any case, I want to be able to own games, as well. And while what is considered "ownership" shifts. I want the right to be able to play games I have paid for. And not have that right to play dictated by people with more money than me. Upon me are being impressed things which incumber my ability to play even further than years passed.

themilo504:
My biggest fear is that one day steam will disappear, taking away most of my game collection

Being one of the first groups try this, Valve actually has an apocalypse contingency plan, at which point they'll provide time for you to download and back-up your files, and they'll provide a universal unlock.

The real fear is if Steam got bought out by someone else, but their price is well beyond what EA offered.

238U

Well done Bob.

The resident movie expert has given us the most level headed analysis of the video game console reveal debacle. Well done indeed sir.

This is the classic contrast between tangible and intellectual property.

Physical items are "rivalrous," if I am using an apple or a ferrari or any other object, then no one else can use it at the same time. That's not true of intellectual property, and its especially not true of digital data, where everyone in the world can theoretically possess an exact replica of the code for every video game for a ridiculously low marginal cost.

There is no perfect solution to the problem of ensuring that developers get reasonable, but not usurious, compensation for the making video games. but I would much rather see the US adopt the relatively new standard in Europe. In 2012, the European Court of Justice ruled that when software companies sell permanent licenses to their software, those licenses are effectively property (the case is UsedSoft v. Oracle). They can be bought and sold on the secondary market, but only so long as the original licensee actually gives up their license. This is a really sensible balance between the interest of software developers in adequate compensation, and the interest of consumers to dispose of their possessions as they wish. I would really really like to the US legal system move towards this standard, but worry I think the IP-intensive industries are too powerful and lobby too effectively for this ever to happen legislatively (e.g. the perpetual extension of copyright protections at the behest of Disney). Everyone call their congressperson and voice support for the doctrine of first sale!!!

Crap! That could actually happen.

I don't want to have to go back to the times when you HAD to support the company, or all your games go away forever!
Hope this doesn't happen.

I also switched to Team PC about a year or so ago. It has its own issues & problems, sure, but while PC gamer problems are progressively being solved, consoles seem adamant to claim each and every PC drawback as its own.

Required installs, activation codes, connectivity problems; PC gaming keeps getting better & lessening these issues, while consoles chew at the bit to adopt them

P.S.: Sony, now's your shot to reclaim console supremacy. Don't screw it up

themilo504:
My biggest fear is that one day steam will disappear, taking away most of my game collection

That would worry me if Valve wasn't posting consistently insane growth every year through Steam.

OT: And I stand with my assessment of this generation, I'm not buying anything but more stuff for my PC, consoles are dead to me.

Aaaah, they said I was mad when I bought my WiiU *bwahahaha* :P

OT. I'm not looking forward for the Xbone because all the reasons people had said so far plus I live in México and actually we don't get to use like 90+% of the apps of the Xbox 360 and I can foretell the same will happend with this new console :S

Thanks Bob, for writing down my fears so accurately. It's been creeping up on us so slowly and that makes it more scary.

crackfool:
For all the outrage on Xbox One games being "services, not products", there is very little when it comes to Steam, a retailer that has been selling "services" that exist only at the whim of a single company for the past few years. Most will say that the reason Steam gets very little backlash is because games on Steam are often put on sale for a fraction of their MSRPs.

Which means that the issue really has less to do with "services vs products" but rather price. It seems that consumers don't mind buying games whose functionality are tied to a single company so long as the price is right. But who's to say that the pricing model of the next generation will follow that of the current generation (in which nearly every retail game is $60, and every digital game is $10-20)?

I'd say it's more that people have relied on the used market to game on a budget, and while Steam has taken the right of resale (though is there anything stopping you from just selling your Steam account?) they've greatly increased a gamers ability ability to stretch their wallet.

You also don't seem to properly understand how Steam pricing works. It's not a cut and dry retails game = $60 and digital game = $10-20. New AAA games released on Steam also go for $50-60. The key is if you're patient and keep your eye open within a 1-2 years you'll be able to find that game on sale for $5-10. If you can't afford it then don't pay the premium new sale price. Let a backlog build up and buy the games when you can afford them. For example I still haven't gotten Skyrim yet.

Then there's one tiny little tidbit that seems to always get overlooked in regards to Steam: before Valve stepped in there was a major trend of retailers abandoning PC games in favour of the more lucrative console games. If you walked into a Gamestop/EB Games in 2000, you'd have an entire wall dedicated to new and used PC games. 2005, the used games are all but gone and PC games only take up a small section of a wall. 2010, maybe you'll find a couple of new games on one of shelving units in the middle of the store. Buying PC games through retail was falling into a void. Steam did not cause this void, rather they stepped in to fill it and basically saved PC gaming.

And I guess one more little thing... to create a retail copy you basically need a publisher, and requiring a publisher to make a game would have prevented all sorts of great indy games from ever being made.

Yes... Well, this is just pretty much the worst way for this to happen I can think of.

At least communist/socialist ideals that require the forfeiting of some ideas about private ownership had some ideals behind them related to it being for the greater good. - It might not ever work that way in practice, but at least the reasoning behind it was to make people's lives better as a result.

Meanwhile, we now have private ownership being eroded, not for any idealistic cause, or misguided attempt to make the world a better place, but purely for a cynical and blatant attempt by corporations to be as greedy and power-hungry as they possibly can be. - With pretty much a total disregard for the consequences it has for anyone else.

So... Why does the world seem to be determined to try and turn into a corporate-led, dehumanizing dystopia exactly?
I feel sick just thinking about it.

Uriel-238:

themilo504:
My biggest fear is that one day steam will disappear, taking away most of my game collection

Being one of the first groups try this, Valve actually has an apocalypse contingency plan, at which point they'll provide time for you to download and back-up your files, and they'll provide a universal unlock.

The real fear is if Steam got bought out by someone else, but their price is well beyond what EA offered.

238U

Actually the real fear for Steam is if Valve goes public. Right now Valve is a privately held company with Gabe Newell owing a majority of the stock, meaning he can run the company whichever way he likes. But if Valve were to ever go public, they'd be susceptible to all the other short term monetization scheming that all the other big publishers have to deal with.

I bought a 360 because back in highschool my friends all had 360s, I bought a PS3 because the 360 didn't have a blu-ray player (and because of Studio Ghibli was coming out with a game...) but other than that, my console days are pretty much done. I have a PC if I want to play a tripple A game, and unless we get a 2nd Studio Ghibli game, I can't think of a Sony title that I want that I can't get on PC.

That said, I do have a lot of money tied up in Steam.... So TBH it isn't much different than what Xbox One is offering. The difference is, that I can upgrade my PC when I want to, and I can put Steam on any new PC I build. I don't have to be tied to a certain companies machine, and technically if I wanted to use a service other than Steam, I could. Now, try telling Microsoft you want to use your Xbox to buy games off of the PSN.... NOT gonna happen....

My answer to the Xbox One is to not to rant, rave, complain, or otherwise bitch across the internet. My answer is simply to not buy it. I have repeated this mantra far too many times, but I repeat it again here: a company hears and understands only two sounds, the creak of your wallet opening and the slap of your wallet closing; all other sounds are just noise to be ignored. I can live quite fine holding onto my money; I don't feel any burning need to constantly give it away. There are other means of obtaining and playing video games other than Microsoft's anti-consumer box. There are other things I can purchase and enjoy for entertainment should the game industry finally implode under its own stupidity. And if all else fails, there is still always my own imagination. I'm still free to just make shit up to entertain myself. Can always learn to make my own movies, write my own books, or create my own games.

We've all let ourselves become to emotionally dependent on this crap; that's why these companies think they can just pull this garbage and get away with it. However, people need to wake-up that they need and want our money more than we do. We're really the ones with the power, not them. If we aren't willing to give them our money because we are tired of their shit, I guarantee they'll suddenly change, and those that don't will simply face the cold horror of natural selection.

ADDENDUM: In case it's not clear, JUST DON'T BUY IT, PEOPLE! Quit squawking about it and just refuse to buy the damn thing. It's not worth the words we keep throwing at it. If it's a piece of shit, note it as such, refuse to buy it, and then move on. We really don't need to waste any more time and energy on garbage.

Well, Bob, have you heard of a gaming platform called "personal computer"?
This "personal computer" (or a PC for short) is a marvelous device that allows you to play games at the highest quality, modify these games and eventually you will learn a thing or two about machine itself.
Besides being great gaming platform it is also wonderful tool for doing all sorts of useful stuff, like writing, painting, making videos and music, etc.
You are intrigued I see? Good.
What? How do you get games for this PC?
There are few ways.
1.Buy them at the stores. But who needs those physical boxes to collect dust on them?
2.Buy from Steam, GOG, Origin (or any other digital store you prefer). Yes, digital copies via internet. Oh, I see your paranoia-meter is spiking. While it is viable reaction, especially when taking into consideration how M$ tries to x-bone console gamers, on PC there are powers that prevents such thing from happening.
3.Torrents. THAT is the power that prevents dickish behavior from publishers/providers. Yes, I know, I've heard it all: "piracy is evil", "piracy is destroying PC gaming", "piracy is theft", "you are horrible person if you defend piracy", blablabla. But the fact is- if Valve, for example, does something so unacceptable for you that you cease to use Steam, you have an option to download all your game library from torrents and keep playing them. And they know it.
So are you interested, Bob?

People forget that the game Monopoly was created to demonstrate the negative aspects of capitalism (specifically regarding land monopolies, but the lesson still applies) that profits trickle upwards until only property owners have any money. And Monopoly only took into account market forces, not more sophisticated economic concepts such as regulatory capture or anti-competitive practices. While we haven't achieved the situation in which the affluent have all the wealth and the impoverished have one, we are approaching such where the comparison is billionaires to people who live on less than $20,000. The differences in wealth are negligible.

But this is not the first time Big Micro has tried to pull this kind of licensing bullshit. The Zune was also contingent on ever advancing DRM, and part of its failure was due to the MS policy that when an old DRM was phased out and you couldn't play your old tunes, your license would just end, and you'd have to buy your new tunes all over again. One would expect that holding a license means that you are entitled to your media no matter how often it changes platforms, but big media has always enjoyed (and now takes for granted) treating such "licenses" as products when it suits them. DVD dies to Blu-Ray? You gotta buy all your movies all over again. Sorry, chum. But if you rip a tune from a CD and share it with your buddies, BY GOD THAT'S STEALING!

Myself, I have no cart in this race. My experiences with PSone-style controllers have soured my interest in console games. I love mouse and keyboard, and cannot stand the fairly uniform controller scheme, especially when I'm trying to look around or maneuver a camera. I also resent that many many console games don't have customizable keys, an issue on which PC gaming has spoiled me rotten. I've heard nothing good about Kinect and when I play games want to be able to do the most with the least amount of movement. When Sony PSN and XBox LIVE started killing accounts (and their associated consoles) arbitrarily without accountability, I was so relieved I wasn't a part of that. (I don't have a Origin account for the same reason.) Anyway, my own grievances are about Windows 8, its poor security, its invasions of privacy and the Windows Certification process which is already a vehicle for censorship. But I suspect that these will either be fixed or will kill Windows 8, and I digress.

My hope is that the Bone is going to be a spectacular flop. I hope that Microsoft loses money in 2013 for daring to release a consumer-unfriendly "all purpose" game console after releasing such a consumer-unfriendly OS. I hope that "xbone" becomes a colloquialized verb, meaning to make a grievous mistake that everyone foresaw but you, as in don't xbone this, or wow, the new Star Wars got totally xboned! I want Sony, Nintendo and the new owners of Microsoft to be completely penitent to their consumer base the way that EA now has to reassure us that new titles do not require a persistent online connection and can completely be played offline OH GOD PLEASE GIVE US ANOTHER CHANCE!

I don't think anything less will get to Big Micro's bean counters. They really do think of us as walking brainless wallets.

238U

I'm not going to go as far as to say I disagre with Bob but it seems to me that in many cases when purchasing a game, you are basically purchasing your way into a service. I mean, its not like the old days when you bought the software on a medium, like a cartridge, and played it on the system and that was the end of involvement of the manufacturer/publisher. Most games have some kind of internet enabled feature now, be it multiplayer or content delivery or leader boards, or a peristant gaming world in the case of mmos and such. Now you're not just buying the software from the vendor and each going seperate ways, you're buying the software and counting on them to provide the service that underlies it that enables it to be used, or updated, or patched, or expaned, or played with other people. Buying the game for a one time price should entitle you to all that at no additional expenditure?? That would be one thing if you were willing to shell out a larger admission price for the game, but people complain that games are too expensive as is.

So we want larger, deeper, richer gaming experiences, that require more work and time in development, and we want updates and additional content, but we don't want to pay any more when we purchase the game. When would this all get paid for? Yea, I miss the days of no DRM. I remember installing the orginal "starsiege tribes" on every computer that would run it in my Marine barracks after buying one disc. And the hours of enjoyment 12-16 marines had on that one purchase. I can't blame the companies for wanting to put an end to that even if It was great for me. Maybe when it comes to games that are not stand alone experiences we need to adjust our notions of ownership and recognize what we're buying when we buy that disc.

themilo504:
My biggest fear is that one day steam will disappear, taking away most of my game collection

Won't happen. If your connection to the steam cloud fails, for whatever reason, you can still play your games online, as long as they are installed to your P.C.. Not a problem.

WaitWHAT:

themilo504:
My biggest fear is that one day steam will disappear, taking away most of my game collection

Won't happen. If your connection to the steam cloud fails, for whatever reason, you can still play your games online, as long as they are installed to your P.C.. Not a problem.

Gotta buy a new Hardrive to hold all 186 of my steam games. lol

If I'm paying for their machine, their service and they have trouble trusting me!? A customer? They don't pay me anything and yet even after buying, they expect us to jump through hoops? No thanks, it's a machine I will not get. The problem I have with the once a day online check, is that if you buy the machine, you're telling them it's okay to do this sort of thing.

Once they think it's okay, then what's to stop them thinking twice a day is okay with a patch/update to the machine, they make you agree to a terms of service or your machine is bricked. People agree to that, then eventually it's always online, because that's how corporate ass-hats think.

For me, it's a moral thing, I buy it, I should be able to use it however I want. If someone was to pirate games etc, if they log on to XBL then they accept the consequences when that is detected, but to assume we won't be using the machine as intended shows me a lack of trust for the people buying it. Now I do not trust them at all and they have to earn that, which now will a lot harder. Even if they were to remove the DRM the fact is, they wanted it there, so I will not trust them.

Every time I see the Cloud advertised as a benefit I shudder. Yeah it's convenient, but I don't want it to be the only thing, you know? I try not to think about it when I use Steam but the "danger" is there, so it's scary to think that at some point it might be the way all media is experienced.

Here's a question I want answered.

When the Xbox One's time in the sun is over, and the new system is on the horizon, and Microsoft stops supporting it... what happens when this system can no longer go online to authenticate its games to grant me "permission" to play the library I've spent years and hundreds of dollars acquiring?

Because it needs that daily online check to function... so what happens when, 10 years from now, the servers to the system have been turned off and the system is effectively a non-functioning brick?

Zombie_Moogle:
I also switched to Team PC about a year or so ago. It has its own issues & problems, sure, but while PC gamer problems are progressively being solved, consoles seem adamant to claim each and every PC drawback as its own.

Required installs, activation codes, connectivity problems; PC gaming keeps getting better & lessening these issues, while consoles chew at the bit to adopt them

P.S.: Sony, now's your shot to reclaim console supremacy. Don't screw it up

Agreed, all Sony have to do is be less evil than Microsoft and then they can take my money.

Although I don't buy second hand games I like the option. I like physical things, so if comes down to owning rather paying for a service I know who I'll side with.

That being said perhaps PCs are the answer, Steam I think they offers enough for me to not mind paying for downloads over disks although my internet being slow means anything in the region of the usual disk capacity these days could take hours.

So, welcome to the world of PC gaming I guess? Steam, Origin, hello? No comparisons? Hello? Do I live in an alternate universe where we have no digital-only distribution services for the PC, locked down, online-only and with no possibility for resale?

Really, in this universe, the Xbone is the first system ever with such a system?

Didn't Adobe introduce a software rental system, where if you stop paying or Adobe goes under, you're cut out not just from games, but from your work and your files?

Nah, I must have been sleeping for the past decade. Hey wake me up so I can also badmouth Microsoft, as it is the first and the worst, yea!

GAunderrated:

WaitWHAT:

themilo504:
My biggest fear is that one day steam will disappear, taking away most of my game collection

Won't happen. If your connection to the steam cloud fails, for whatever reason, you can still play your games online, as long as they are installed to your P.C.. Not a problem.

Gotta buy a new Hardrive to hold all 186 of my steam games. lol

Oh, no need for that. If somehow Steam goes bust, the rest of the internet flying the cross-bone flag has your back on acquiring games you already paid for, without bricking your computer. The Cloud, basically. :P

I mean, you bought the license, right?

The Pink Pansy:

crackfool:
For all the outrage on Xbox One games being "services, not products", there is very little when it comes to Steam, a retailer that has been selling "services" that exist only at the whim of a single company for the past few years. Most will say that the reason Steam gets very little backlash is because games on Steam are often put on sale for a fraction of their MSRPs.

Which means that the issue really has less to do with "services vs products" but rather price. It seems that consumers don't mind buying games whose functionality are tied to a single company so long as the price is right. But who's to say that the pricing model of the next generation will follow that of the current generation (in which nearly every retail game is $60, and every digital game is $10-20)?

One point; when Steam can't connect to the internet, you can still play all your games just fine. From all indications given by Microsoft thus far, with the Xbone if you can't connect to the internet once a day your console bricks itself until you can, preventing you from playing any games. This key point is the difference, at least for me.

Some of your games. Anytime you try to play some of them offline, they mystically need to update, but work the second you connect to the internet. Without updating. See: Civ V.

I agree completely. And I've been saying the same thing to whoever will listen. The idea that things you buy are no longer products but services that you pay only a license for is idiotic and I can't grasp how people can be so stupid to buy into that idea. There are actually a few of those corporate apologists on this very forum. I hate them and I would show them no mercy.

I think that another industry crash is our only hope. It must happen.

[shrugs] all any of this really makes me think about is : this connecting to the cloud to improve your gaming experience really worked out well for Simcity, right?

My real concern that if this is as bad as I am going to imagine, Sony will be basically forced by the big developers to adopt this strategy (if they haven't already and just haven't said anything) if this is even remotely successful. Of course now I have to pick if I want to go for the Cloud based ideas of Microsoft which people have been using on the PC for years to some extent or another, or go with Sony who I won't trust with any personal information.

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