Game Design Sketchbook: Police Brutality

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Game Design Sketchbook: Police Brutality

Through designing and playing this game sketch, I've discovered my own strategy for dealing with police brutality in a public forum. Should I ever find myself in that kind of situation, I'd be ready to act, and I'd be brave enough to act. At least I hope that I'd be brave enough to act.

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How very interesting, i shall try this out once my massive workload has dissapeared.

A very interesting article, and like sammyfreak, I'll give it a download soon as well.

You are not legally allowed to resist arrest nor removal from public places if it is obvious you are causing trouble like the idiot in the video. It is not legal to obstruct authorities from doing their job.

It was rather obvious he was being a loud, obnoxious ass and a big drama queen.

The animal video analogy was way off as well. You can't realistically compared a Predator-Prey relationship to a public-nuisance vs legal authority reaction.

The people who try to keep the peace already have it hard enough without the anti-rational, unpragmatic, sympathy-for-the-devil witch-hunters swooping in to spin every situation way out of proportion to make whatever agenda they fanatically espouse seem more digestible.

If only the energy and talents that went into making the cop-hater game went into making a stop the robber. Trust me when I say that criminals won't treat you half as nice if you sit in a doorway blocking their exit.

That is what is funny with people. Criminals get more respect and glory then authorities because they are genuinely afraid of the former but feel they can get away with being stupid if the later have enough laws, lawyers, and red tape hamstringing them.

Let's not get pants-on-head retarded over this, shall we?

Banned. /mod.

I don't want to excuse the total exaggeration of taser-use, BUT:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Meyer#Legal_action

Meyer later issued a public apology for his "failure to act calmly", stating that he "stepped out of line" and that his arresting officers "did nothing wrong".

Yes, I believe the officers aceted totally wrong, but so did Meyers.

Lessons learned: Yelling at the police turns red people into yellow, yellow people into green and when a police touches a green person they become purple.

That video was something I had seen before, but it is no less disturbing seeing it again. That is the kind of thing I would expect to see in China (somebody I know HAS seen something like that in China), but that young man was just exercising his rights as an American citizen. If there is no good reason to be arrested, somebody should stand up and protest.

I'll try that game out, you have me intrigued.

"My spouse has been in that kind of situation. Her friend spoke past the three-minute limit at a city meeting, was asked to leave by the mayor, refused to leave, was tackled by police, and was eventually dragged out of the room."

Ah okay, so the rules didn't apply to her friend? And that when someone tries to enforce the rules then WAAAAAHHH that's so unfair?

Christ, the whole article is pure garbage as is the premise of the game. Unfortunately that seems to be the problem with society today (let me guess, you hate Bush too and think Obama walks on water?), no one wants to follow the rules. When you're in public you're expected to act a certain way, and follow whatever rules that are applicable in the situation. If you're in a public forum then you have absolutely no right to monopolize everyone else's time. The world doesn't revolve around you.

And frankly it's laughable to sit there and use these examples of jackasses in public forum and what happens to them as examples of police brutality (likewise, the comment about 'whoa, this is just like in China!' is way out of touch with reality). Some guy get raped with a plunger by cops, *that's* police brutality. Crying over having to follow rules? Puh-leaze...

JQAdams:

I kept the story about my spouse's friend short for the sake of a non-boring article. I'll elaborate a bit.

Several people at the city meeting spoke past the 3-minute mark without a comment or complaint from the mayor. Fay, my wife's friend, began speaking, and throughout her comment, the city clerk held the time clock right in the mayor's face so that the mayor would know exactly when 3 minutes were up. When 3 minutes were up, the mayor told her to stop. She said, "Just let me finish my thought," or something like that, and kept speaking for 15 seconds more. When she turned to leave the podium, the mayor said, "Please leave, Fay." And she said that she wasn't leaving. He told her to leave again, and things escalated from there, up to the point where she was tackled to the ground, etc.

Fay was someone that the mayor happened to hate, and city council always found her comments annoying. There was something on the agenda later on that night that Fay really wanted to see, so she really didn't want to leave the meeting for fear of missing it.

While the police tackled Fay, the mayor retreated to the back room, where he remained until the police hauled her away.

She was brought to trial for disorderly conduct a month or so later. After a lengthy hearing with a dozen or more witnesses, she was found "not guilty" by the judge. I saw the trial, which is where I heard some of these details (like the part about the clerk holding up the time clock so that the mayor could stop Fay right on the 3-minute mark). Part of the reason that she was found "not guilty" was that the 3-minute limit was not enforced for any other public comment that night.

So do you get it now, JQA? It's not about "the rules not applying to one person." It's about the rules being leveraged unfairly to silence one person. Unequal protection under the law, and I'm pretty sure the Constitution forbids it.

Sorry that my edited, short version of the story was confusing.

Russ:

Can we re-enable comment #4? I don't see any reason for that person to be banned.

Jason

He could have handled that in a much more civil way. All he had to do was scream at the top of his lungs all the way to the precinct, then called a lawyer with the money his parents certainly have. He took it way out of hand, I'm not what the cops did was right, but this moron was catalyzing the situation.

Bearclaw66:
That video was something I had seen before, but it is no less disturbing seeing it again. That is the kind of thing I would expect to see in China (somebody I know HAS seen something like that in China), but that young man was just exercising his rights as an American citizen. If there is no good reason to be arrested, somebody should stand up and protest.

I'll try that game out, you have me intrigued.

Being an obnoxious moron is not exercising his right to be American, with these rights we are guaranteed comes a responsibility to know when to exercise them and when to shut the hell up and call a lawyer.

TomNook:
Being an obnoxious moron is not exercising his right to be American, with these rights we are guaranteed comes a responsibility to know when to exercise them and when to shut the hell up and call a lawyer.

The thing is he didn't do anything to provoke police action. The way the police just randomly arrested him for doing nothing illegal is what is disturbing.

(likewise, the comment about 'whoa, this is just like in China!' is way out of touch with reality)

My apologies if I was unclear, I was simply stating that this is similar to something I know happened in China, where people have far less civil rights.

ok, its clear the guy could have been smarter once the police tried to grab him, but most people react badly to being arrested because they have done nothing wrong. the police clearly used unreasonable force, use of a taser when the guy is down is just the same as kicking him when he is down, its not needed.

as for the game, I'm not to sure the mechanics would work in reality, but the truth is that voicing your opinion started the incident, the police would be less likely to do something that stupid if everyone was voicing the opinion that they were wrong.

the really funny thing is that Kerry wanted to answer his question, the ONLY people against him were the police.

To be honest. This is one of those things where although the police were in the wrong the guy ultimately brought it on himself. The video implies he was simply asking a (stupid consiracy theory) question when he was forcibly removed; which wasnt the case. Simularly, although the police/campus security were perhaps being pushy to remove him, the actualy wrestling starts with the student struggling with the cops while they are escorting him away from the mic.

Problem with this vid is ultimately whoever made it has done the same thing the new programme that first aired the Rodney King incident did. They showed the police brutality without showing what caused it. In Kings case it was a 10minute fight in which hed been peppersprayed & tasered but still refused to stop resisting while high off drugs. In this case its a moronic student who pushed to the front of the questions queue only to engage in a shambolic dialogue with Kerry about all sorts of tedious nonsense. he broke the rules, & made a complete spectacle of himself doing so. The police were in the wrong for using excessive force (though the guy was doing his best to resist for the camera), but I dont feel any sympathy for the guy.

Edit: Oh, & since I should really say something about the game since thats the point of this article; tbh I just found it kinda boring. Not bad for killing 5 minutes but not much longer.

About the video:
The police aren't there to be your friends. They're there to protect civilians (all of them, that includes criminals), and enforce the rules. The police informed the guy he should stop, he didn't comply, beyond that he resisted their efforts to escort him out of the building, he got arrested.
Frankly, I'm surprised it took so many cops to subdue one whiny college kid.

About the game:
I liked the mechanic of voice signaling. The game was kinda fun, but short.

Wish an important issue like this weren't so easily polarized. But we've got folks turning this kid into a martyr and other folks saying that the police are always right and that people who think otherwise are potheads who hate America and have their heads in the clouds.

Sorry Jason, but I don't agree with you completely. It seems to me this guy went over his allotted time and was originally going to be escorted politely out by security. He, in turn, continued to resist in a manner that I would even deem slightly violent (he had no intention of hurting anyone, to be sure, but it must take a lot of strength and effort to repeatedly break their holds like that,) and continued to escalate in his efforts to resist them until he was wrestling on the floor. By the end security was warning him that he would be tazed if he didn't stop struggling, on account of they probably wouldn't have been able to get him out of the building without doing so. That's what I gather from the video, anyhow.

'Course, let's not fool ourselves here. American police do occasionally do some horrible stuff. The game itself I do find interesting, because there are likely many times when people want to say things that are too 'inconvenient' though completely in their right to say so and get hauled away anyway. We've got accountability issues and a few more problems to boot. Of course I'm very grateful to the many, many upstanding officers that do their job with the best of intentions and do it well; That doesn't mean the system is perfect, though.

Though short, I did find the game a somewhat compelling comment on peaceful resistance.

Its possible by watching a few Youtube videos to piece together an almost full 3-D picture of the entire auditorium:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmvCHAaKGyk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7Qef8oPmag

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnAGjmnfqik

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJXzohdF-MA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOlmNBxke-E

These videos don't precede the take down enough to confirm the allegations of Andrew Meyer pushing to the front of the queue, as Cousin_IT asserts.

In fact, it looks a lot like less than a few minutes (public forums often allow 2-5 minutes for questions fielded, right? At least that is what is in town council meetings I have attended just to see how these things work when I was interested in the direction of local development plans) goes by after being acknowledged by the key note speaker, John Kerry, before he is asked to leave by campus security/bylaw enforcement/police, then the mic is cut, and he is physically handled. Please note, he is grabbed from behind, how would you react to someone who grabs your arm from behind? I know I would instinctually pull away. Then it escalates to where he is resisting, later admitted by him as a react out of paranoia of having a "1984" pulled on him during his ride to the station to be booked.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5Y4nC5OPLA

He was was told in the ride to the station that his arrest was for Inciting A Riot. What the ... am I the only one who thought he was being pretty calm (and the crowd too) up until the part where he was asked to leave only seconds at the mic?

The whole thing is pretty sketchy, there are lots of details I don't know about the incident, but what is revealed is pretty disturbing to anyone who would want to raise questions that might annoy those in a position of authority. I'm not saying what the officers did wasn't by the book, I am saying why were they behind Andrew from the get go: Cousin_IT suggests it was because of previous disruptive behavior, then I need to ask, where is the objective evidence?

So, does anyone know how this story turned out? Was Andrew Meyer taken to court? Was he convicted of Inciting A Riot? Has any of the authority figures involved been sued?

Also, I'm not certain yelling and shouting would really do anything in incidents like these, there are clearly people yelling "Why are you ...! What did he do!" in the video, and it didn't make a bit of difference. No, if you really feared for the protester's own safety, you are going to have to physically risk something and impose your own will on that of the "legal" enforcers, and subdue them before they can subdue you. By that point it would be a friggin brawl, so that doesn't really accomplish anything if you want to peacefully resist. To peacefully resist, you would have to be willing to get the beats laid on you with out giving it back. But is that responsible considering enforcement escalated incidents?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWbgnyUCC7M

Awesome article... I couldn't really hear the officers well in the video, did they tell him why he was being placed under arrest? 'Cus he does have a right to that information... Also: I never heard about any follow-up lawsuits on police brutality etc. Links anyone?

I cite the wikipedia article on the subject & the sources used as reference for the section on what occured before the Youtube videos start (note that every youtube vid starts from the same point showing nothing of what occurs before).

http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/1031/p09s01-coop.html?page=1
http://www.gainesville.com/article/20070922/OPINION03/709220315

Read these articles; Together they portray a very different picture than the Youtube videos give. Did the police overreact? I think so (though in 2nd video you link if you listen to the post footage interviews one of the student supports their actions). However, just because the cops were in the wrong does not put Meyer in the right; or even make the police's initial actions unjustified.

As I understand it Meyer was charged & spent a night in jail.

As for the conspiracy theory that he was removed coz he was asking awkward questions; perhaps theres something in that. But imo if that was a factor it was simply one amoung many. The cops were waiting for him to finish asking one question (note: he was engaging in both a rambling dialogue & tried to ask three) having already made a scene prior to getting to ask one (Kerry agreed to let him ask which afaik is why he wasnt removed straight away). There is much more to this then these videos suggest, look it up. Also, dont indicate my need to provide objective evidense, implying that your collection of Youtube videos are. The camera only sees what the user wants it to. At least one of the videos is heavily edited & another is a video of a newsclip (again edited to fit the storytime).

Finally. Do police/government officals sometimes overstep the line? Undoubtably. My dad had his skull fractured at one Pro-Hunting march simply for being at the front of the crowd when some people started pushing for a fight with the police. Police etc do sometimes break the rules, sometimes im sure they do do things like that final video you linked (though in that case I think its as much a case of the Union trying to drum up support as an actual conspiracy, it takes more then army jackboots to convicnce me they were cops). But in this specific case. Meyer was at fault &, while perhaps handled badly, the police were not acting improperly in trying to remove him. His case may, directly or indirectly, highlight a problem, but do not make him a martyr; he does not deserve it.

edit: Having looked further it appears he infact wasnt charged with any crimes. However, he issued an apology quote: "I made the decision to supersede the rules, and for that I apologize," Meyer wrote. "I should have acted calmer and obeyed the directives of the officers. If I had, none of the subsequent issues would ever have arisen."
Source: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21541335/

Although some dont believe his apology was sincere: if you read this news report; it suggests that many people at the university in question dont think it deserves to be the big deal it has been made into: http://www.gainesville.com/article/20071031/NEWS/710310332

Huh? Just want it to be clear, I wasn't trying to imply anything else wasn't objective evidence, only that being what I was asking for. When it came to the videos I listed, I wasn't looking to refute anything, only multiple angles on the incident, and from that drawing what my impressions of the incident were even while admitting it plainly wasn't the full picture of the whole incident, and in that regard, thank you for the link.

Though, I should point out, not every video starts at the same point, some start where John Kerry is still speaking with Andrew Meyer appearing to be waiting to speak by the mic, where as some start only when Andrew Meyer is starting to speak - the ones with John Kerry still speaking are about as far back as they seem to go before the take down, so I am thankful for your link to the eye witness account which makes the assertion to why the enforcement officers were present, which does seem to show that John Kerry was in fact trying in his own way to diffuse the situation - which begs the question as to why the officers grabbed Andrew part way through his ranting, instead of just letting him blow off steam. If Andrew had been rushing the stage or shouting at the crowd to some violent action, yeah, step in, but at that point it really did seem like they were being gung-ho at some event organizer's request or suggestion to that effect.

As far as video being objective, I would like to assert that video on board police cars have helped secure convictions more so than first hand accounts, due to the vagaries of memory. While its not beyond the scope for video to be doctored or edited, as seen in some of the youtube videos, with our current technology it is easier to spot false video than it is to spot unintentionally false memory.

With regards to the actions the police took, it was by the book, in fact in some regards they were going easy on him by not applying the use of a baton aka night stick or a flash light to subdue him, instead relying on strength in numbers by isolating limbs and downward pressure on the rib cage, though I thought the taser was excessive but that may be hind sight, given the number of cases we are aware of now where tasers can in fact be lethal, despite assertions to the contrary: such as this incident - http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=_IJqdL40lvU

My point about the youtube vids is that they all start before what eyewitnesses cite as the first disruption caused by Andrew Meyer; him pushing to the front of the queue on the left of the auditorium after the announcement that the mic on the right (where he was waiting) would be turned off before he would be at the front of that line. All give the impression that it was a calm discourse that escalated, when infact it would appear that there was a previous heated exchange involving Meyers which had calmed down. My understanding is that Meyers had demanded to ask Kerry a question; & to placate him Kerry agreed but continued to answer the question he was answering before Meyers first outburst (which is what Kerry is doing at the start of the Youtube video).

When taken out of context, the Youtube videos show a decent dialogue between Meyers & Kerry which was escalated by the police without real provocation. This does not appear to actually have been the case. There was a prior incident; & on getting to ask his question Meyers instead rambles on about all sorts of things before finally asking three questions; doing so in an increasingly agitated manner after the policewoman aparently asks him to finish talking. Now Im sure if the police hadnt responded by cutting his mic & attempting to lead him out the auditorium, Kerry could have answered his questions & Meyers gone away content. But the police were not acting out of line in escorting him away; indeed its quite possible that had Kerry not answered how Meyers wanted he'd continue to "hog the mic" (ive been to Q&A's where its happened, its bloody frustrating to say the least) further exacerbating the situation.

The video of the inside of the policecar is good & objective. But the videos from inside the auditorium are not. They arnt static cameras, CCTV or constantly running newscameras. They are home movies. The first one you show was filmed on Meyers own Camera, which he handed to another student after the first disruption took place & so unable to show it. The cop car footage shows, equally, that once hes calmed down Meyers is alot more cooperative with the police, & likewise they are with him. Had he acted that way within the auditorium this no doubt wouldnt have happened. Indeed, had he not started yelling & screaming, the cops might have heard Kerry asking for him to remain & the whole thing would have not happened.

Thanks. As I thought, we were totally missing the context, and dealing with someone who didn't respect other people.

AnteGravity was provocative, but he had points.

People say that what the police did was wrong.
Sorry, but it appears the law forbids this kind of nuisance. Of course, you can speak for hours about a law which would forbid people from creating ruckuss - I consider that a bit of chaos is necessary at every level - and you could even try to spin it and exagerate by saying that this kind of law would be perfect in a totalitarian regime, but it lacks context.
In this case, I believe it has more to do with "respect the other" and less "STFU or you're in jail".

The presence of a VIP explains the policemen's tension and hesitationless reaction.
The cops really tried to get Meyers out.
Now, I don't really see what the taser provided at all. It obviously didn't calm the guy, and the way he shouts sounds like bad acting (aw aw aw aw it hurts pleeeease aw aw aw).
I don't see why they just didn't grab him, all of them, and put it into the car or something.

So on one hand, you have an attention whore, a sort of ass, and on the other, tense policemen. Boom cocktail.

My spouse has been in that kind of situation. Her friend spoke past the three-minute limit at a city meeting, was asked to leave by the mayor, refused to leave, was tackled by police, and was eventually dragged out of the room. Everyone in the room, including my spouse, stood by and watched it happen. According to my spouse, these situations paralyze the onlookers with shock.

On the theory, I don't see much problem in that.
Of course, again, the details matter more. How did the police act is the main point of focus.

The irony of the taser is that it won't cause as many deaths as guns do, but then it has people thinking that since it doesn't kill in general (even if it does, looking at the ratio of deaths by taser/reported uses would be interesting), it can be used more, because of a logic shortcut - they're rather harmless - which works a lot more in a country with so much guns. Therefore, you somehow get more people thinking they can shock others, which some people would see as torture.

In my view, it's still better than shotguns in a country where it's your right to shoot to defend yourself.

I also did not find the video funny. I enjoyed the game; it did a nice job of representing collective effort to thwart the police.

Arbre, the purpose of the taser was to incapacitate him, not calm him. By overloading his nervous system it allows officers to gain control over belligerent or non-cooperative suspects, both of which describe Meyer. It is a shame that people come running to the defense of people like him, and that people get banned when they criticize socially irresponsible and baseless games like "Police Brutality."

Regarding the issue of deaths via taser, they are almost non-existent, especially considering how often they are used. When it does happen it's because of a pre-existing condition that would not have been an issue if the person had complied. Officers here in Portland have relied on them very heavily because they are extrordinarily effective (much more so than standard issue pepper spray), they are very safe, and the effect is short lasting. Tasers have really been a God send for the police.

That is the first time i ever see this video. frightening.
I do not intend to go off topic but this video reminds me one i already saw on a French TV show on about the investigations done after the Koursk Incident in Russia.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=QRCQozltLmA

you can see this woman and mother who has lost his one son during this incident, yelling on a military guy -commandant or something- about how the military handled the rescuin' of the dead submariners, how he should be ashamed to stand there and all that.
And note the presence of this woman standin' behind her after a while... and this seringe she hit the old woman with at 1:41mn... soon after the old lady collapses...

The context is different, the rules are different, the story is different but it is still pretty frightening and reminds me this police tasing video in some way.

The police did their job.
They were told to remove him, he resisted, they warned him they would use a taser on him if he continued resisting, and he didn't stop.

I'm sure there is much worse police brutality happening more often.

The issue with this particular case: why were the police told to remove him?
Because the question was going to make Kerry look bad.
If they had let Kerry handle it, there likely would have been no problem, but someone (one of Kerry's staff perhaps?) decided Meyer shouldn't be able to speak freely.

There's the real issue.

Ah, this is doing the rounds again?

Might I recommend this? You may think ill of the source, but these guys tend to reliably document things because, to be honest, the truth is often far more hilarious than fiction. Contains a few interesting tid-bits.

This game looks like an interesting commentary on the subject of police abuse. I too have thought about making a game on the subject, but more from the angle of resource management on the police side.

A few years ago, I was the victim of what I like to call "bored police syndrome". I was pulled over for making a left turn through a yellow light. Since there was alcohol on my breath, I had to take the Breathalyzer and scored 0.05. Since I didn't meet the prerequisites for a jail trip, the officer threw the Breathalyzer on the ground, claimed it wasn't working properly, and called for a second unit to conduct a retest. When I scored 0.04 on the retest, the officer ordered that I not continue to drive and to leave the area. When I started to walk away, the second officer (the one who brought the Breathalyzer which was working correctly) ordered me back and told me I was being placed under arrest for public intoxication. Apparently, my assertion that the machine already proved that I wasn't drunk so "you can't arrest me for that" constituted resisting arrest. I was a rag-doll throughout the process, but I was somehow charged 6 offenses including "making terroristic threats" -- all but the left-turn-on-yellow were dropped.

I don't think #4 should have been banned for his comments, regardless of how "pants on the head" they were. There are people in our society who do have the belief that the police are above reproach, and his statements reflect the view that those people hold. I'm not naive enough to think discourse, games, or anything outside of personal experience will change his opinion, but his are important when considering how to design social/political commentary game such as this.

Supermane1985:
Arbre, the purpose of the taser was to incapacitate him, not calm him. By overloading his nervous system it allows officers to gain control over belligerent or non-cooperative suspects, both of which describe Meyer.

What I meant by calm him was make him STFU. :)
Sorry if it didn't transpire through my post.

That said, he may have been critically overreacting, but thus far, he seemed to be lifting some interesting points (I can't say if they were genuinely good to reply to or not).

The most troubling part of it is how, somehow, the police forces started to react and move closer from the moment the guy started asking itching questions.

kalaim:
That is the first time i ever see this video. frightening.
I do not intend to go off topic but this video reminds me one i already saw on a French TV show on about the investigations done after the Koursk Incident in Russia.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=QRCQozltLmA

you can see this woman and mother who has lost his one son during this incident, yelling on a military guy -commandant or something- about how the military handled the rescuin' of the dead submariners, how he should be ashamed to stand there and all that.
And note the presence of this woman standin' behind her after a while... and this seringe she hit the old woman with at 1:41mn... soon after the old lady collapses...

The context is different, the rules are different, the story is different but it is still pretty frightening and reminds me this police tasing video in some way.

Well, in both cases, there's someone creating a problem, focusing attention, although I must say, even after reading the ED link, the Koursk related one, which I also saw a while ago, is more dramatic.
The most problematic aspect of this is how this part was totally censored. Press in Russia is a joke.

Anyhoo, I thought the game was interesting. I too found my strategy. Interestingly I have used the same tactic in less violent situations to good effect. Getting people to help someone is a sort of similar but inverse situation.

I'm very thankful that a man who stood back and said nothing to what occurred, even if it was to protect him, did not become the leader of the most powerful nation on earth. Perhaps the loss at the election broke his spirit, but a man serious about becoming president would have stepped in, regardless of the fact that the person was setting out of embarrass him, and put a stop to it.

On that note, I don't think theirs a single decent, honest person around who would ever run for leadership of any country. All the decent blokes are down at the pub.

argonaut05:
A few years ago, I was the victim of what I like to call "bored police syndrome". I was pulled over for making a left turn through a yellow light. Since there was alcohol on my breath, I had to take the Breathalyzer and scored 0.05. Since I didn't meet the prerequisites for a jail trip, the officer threw the Breathalyzer on the ground, claimed it wasn't working properly, and called for a second unit to conduct a retest. When I scored 0.04 on the retest, the officer ordered that I not continue to drive and to leave the area. When I started to walk away, the second officer (the one who brought the Breathalyzer which was working correctly) ordered me back and told me I was being placed under arrest for public intoxication. Apparently, my assertion that the machine already proved that I wasn't drunk so "you can't arrest me for that" constituted resisting arrest. I was a rag-doll throughout the process, but I was somehow charged 6 offenses including "making terroristic threats" -- all but the left-turn-on-yellow were dropped.

Thats harsh, and piss weak. Such men are not even worthy of the air they breath, let alone a badge.

I like the idea of a game about non-violent resistance, but the video you chose to bring up the subject sort of spoils the topic. The guy in the "Don't Tase Me, Bro" video simply wasn't practicing non-violence. Oh, sure, he didn't throw a punch or anything, but he was constantly pulling away from the cops' grasp and struggling. If he would've just let them handcuff him and walk out (or go limp and let them drag him out) he could have continued to protest loudly and make his so-called point.

Since the line of sight on the video is crappy once he's on the ground, I dunno - maybe it's true he had stopped physically resisting by then and the taser shot was in fact going too far. But as far as I could tell he was freaking out and struggling the whole time.

FWIW, I've been mistakenly handcuffed by the police in a public place before. If you just relax and don't act like an idiot, it's not a big deal. Just let them put the cuffs on and make it very obvious that you're not a physical threat.

Edit: Then again, I live in Canada. Maybe our cops tend to suck less?

As for the game itself, is the only winning strategy to get a whole bunch more people tasered? The whole message that conveys is just ... weird. As though the only meaningful interaction you can have with police is to either cower in fear, or be enough of a jackass that you get tasered. That doesn't really paint a sane picture of non-violent resistance, to me.

For that matter, why is it that in your game, people are being tasered simply for shouting? Are we to assume that the characters are also resisting arrest, or do you seriously think that all that guy did to get himself tasered was shout?

Let's not get pants-on-head retarded over this, shall we?

Banned. /mod.

This pretty much sums up why the police were trying to drag the guy out, too.

Someone should make a game where you shout and shout until you are allowed to take over a public forum and no one does anything about it.

Obviously the man didn't need to try and resist being taken out of the forum, he was trying to get away from the police who he thought where trying to arrest him. It is fair enough that the police tried to take him out of the building.

What is not fair is that while they had him pinned to the ground (5 againts 1) they electrocuted him. This was not needed, they should have lead him out of the building, told him what he had done wrong and then either let him go or take him back to the station to keep him away from the forum. That video is a clear example of how the Police got scared and resulted to using their weapons. I understand that the Police are often in danger and I understand that the Police do need to result to violence to maintain the protection of others however this was not one of those instances. They clearly overreacted, had no idea how to handle the sistuation and fell back on a fail safe (violence). This is basic human behaviour, I suppose you could link it to being trapped in a corner and the only thing you could do is fight tooth and claw against those that had trapped you.

However in this case they did not have their backs to the wall and the sure as hell did not have fight tooth and claw to maintain order in that forum.

I was also disgusted at the fact that those bystanders just stood there, surely one of them, just one, would have had the quick reaction and the guts to say something.

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