155: My Big Fat Geek Wedding

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My Big Fat Geek Wedding

"The Wedding Planning Game, he said, is a never-ending fetch quest; a months-long hunt for vendors, reservations, orders and contracts, culminating either in a successful ceremony or your premature death. It's like Pokémon: the perfect photographer, florist, caterer, DJ, officiant, jeweler and bridesmaids - gotta catch 'em all."

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I'm forwarding this to a couple of friends getting married this week. Fun piece, great editor's choice. ;)

I cried a little in my heart when you mentioned "Aria di Mezza Carattere" from Final Fantasy VI. I have many fond memories of FFVI, in my mind possibly the best RPG of all time. The Opera scene was epic and beautiful. The music was simply gorgeous.

Thanks for bringing back the good memories, and best wishes to you for your wedding.

Normally I love playing old, out-of-current-memory games, but I think Marriage: The Wedding Game is a little too old-fashioned even for me. For one thing, it's WAY too expensive. No antique should be that expensive, it's ridiculous. For another thing, I've seen firsthand that people get bored with it really quick. My mom and dad entered co-op play six months before I was born. They stuck it out for 22 years, and it was a fucking nightmare for both of them. Every time anyone I know plays this game, it's fun and exciting for the first year, and then it turns into a grind-fest.

And don't even get me started on the expansion pack, Marriage 2: Babies. It's a money-pit that preys on the unwary, dragging down all hopes of tranquility, stability and financial independence along with it. And what's worse, you can't buy Marriage without your parents and every other member of your family putting constant pressure on you to get Babies too. The advertisers just won't leave you alone!

The basic flaw in these wedding-themed games is the assumption that their subject matter should inherently appeal to a bride knee-deep in the planning process.

Umm... I'm not sure the target audience is actual brides. In much the same way that porn isn't for people who have real-life sex. ;-)

Sylocat:
Normally I love playing old, out-of-current-memory games, but I think Marriage: The Wedding Game is a little too old-fashioned even for me. For one thing, it's WAY too expensive. No antique should be that expensive, it's ridiculous. For another thing, I've seen firsthand that people get bored with it really quick. My mom and dad entered co-op play six months before I was born. They stuck it out for 22 years, and it was a fucking nightmare for both of them. Every time anyone I know plays this game, it's fun and exciting for the first year, and then it turns into a grind-fest.

And don't even get me started on the expansion pack, Marriage 2: Babies. It's a money-pit that preys on the unwary, dragging down all hopes of tranquility, stability and financial independence along with it. And what's worse, you can't buy Marriage without your parents and every other member of your family putting constant pressure on you to get Babies too. The advertisers just won't leave you alone!

I think one of the reasons some people burn out on the game so much is that it's difficulty level is very high, in fact, most people stink at the game. People that stink at Marriage: The Wedding Game also tend to stink at it's sequel as the second game tends to build heavily on the first. For those who are up for the challenge, both games offer an incredible and incredibly unique experience. Also, the better you are at the game, the more lasting value the game holds for those determined to stick with it.

Novan Leon:
I think one of the reasons some people burn out on the game so much is that it's difficulty level is very high, in fact, most people stink at the game. People that stink at Marriage: The Wedding Game also tend to stink at it's sequel as the second game tends to build heavily on the first. For those who are up for the challenge, both games offer an incredible and incredibly unique experience. Also, the better you are at the game, the more lasting value the game holds for those determined to stick with it.

Like so many games these days, all the best elements of Marriage were cribbed from its boardgame antecedent: Living Together. Nobody knows their history anymore, so nobody acknowledges the debt that modern forms owe to their historical predecessors.

Fact is, you can get all the tactical co-op bliss out of LT that M:tWG provides, without the ridiculous expense, just as people have been doing for thousands of years before the advent of modern hardware. But nobody wants to be old-fashioned, and nobody's got the attention span for it.

Razzle Bathbone:

Novan Leon:
I think one of the reasons some people burn out on the game so much is that it's difficulty level is very high, in fact, most people stink at the game. People that stink at Marriage: The Wedding Game also tend to stink at it's sequel as the second game tends to build heavily on the first. For those who are up for the challenge, both games offer an incredible and incredibly unique experience. Also, the better you are at the game, the more lasting value the game holds for those determined to stick with it.

Like so many games these days, all the best elements of Marriage were cribbed from its boardgame antecedent: Living Together. Nobody knows their history anymore, so nobody acknowledges the debt that modern forms owe to their historical predecessors.

Fact is, you can get all the tactical co-op bliss out of LT that M:tWG provides, without the ridiculous expense, just as people have been doing for thousands of years before the advent of modern hardware. But nobody wants to be old-fashioned, and nobody's got the attention span for it.

I hear ya. We played Living Together for quite a long time, at least a couple of years. Got a lot of mileage out of that one. But I gotta say, nothing beats the feeling of breaking open the shrinkwrap on M:tWG and running that first scenario, Lakefront at Sunset: The Proposal. Worth the first 100 hours or so of tedious Stationary Store hunt-the-pixel. :)

Razzle Bathbone:

Novan Leon:
I think one of the reasons some people burn out on the game so much is that it's difficulty level is very high, in fact, most people stink at the game. People that stink at Marriage: The Wedding Game also tend to stink at it's sequel as the second game tends to build heavily on the first. For those who are up for the challenge, both games offer an incredible and incredibly unique experience. Also, the better you are at the game, the more lasting value the game holds for those determined to stick with it.

Like so many games these days, all the best elements of Marriage were cribbed from its boardgame antecedent: Living Together. Nobody knows their history anymore, so nobody acknowledges the debt that modern forms owe to their historical predecessors.

Fact is, you can get all the tactical co-op bliss out of LT that M:tWG provides, without the ridiculous expense, just as people have been doing for thousands of years before the advent of modern hardware. But nobody wants to be old-fashioned, and nobody's got the attention span for it.

It's true that even though M:tWG does come at an additional cost, it also provides a number of enhanced features that LT never had. That said, the additional cost, higher learning curve and greater difficulty is proving to turn people away from M:tWG in exchange for the cheaper, easier and more accessible LT.

In today's society, people gravitate toward having multiple short pick-up and play sessions of LT rather taking part in single, longer and more difficult play sessions of M:tWG.

That last page pierced my rough craggy exterior to find my soft-spot.

... Who am I kidding, I'm softer than uncooked dough. Still, that was beautiful.

Novan Leon:
In today's society, people gravitate toward having multiple short pick-up and play sessions of LT rather taking part in single, longer and more difficult play sessions of M:tWG.

Pick-up sessions of M:tWG are just as common these days (seems like half the time they never get to the ending cutscene), and epic-style LT play is as amazing as any game I've ever played. My current campaign is over ten years old now, and my playmate and I have no intention of giving it up.

Razzle Bathbone:

Pick-up sessions of M:tWG are just as common these days (seems like half the time they never get to the ending cutscene)

Sadly, this is true.

=D

Haha, this thread is as much fun as this article, thank you, to all the contributors. :-)

BTW, I am enjoying a LT game that I modded to resemble the M:tWG and its expansion pack, had a play session that has gone on for 10 years. Its interesting, if you have any passion for game design, its quite easy to produce your own home brewed mods that IMHO are more meaningful then the traditional store bot fancy frills games. Its all about the passion to dedicated design and play testing, so you maintain the core design while still reinvigorating the game experience. The result: One of the best co-op games I am aware of.

CanadianWolverine:
The result: One of the best co-op games I am aware of.

Play on, brother. Play on.

This is why I love our forums.

Razzle Bathbone:

CanadianWolverine:
The result: One of the best co-op games I am aware of.

Play on, brother. Play on.

I've heard that co-op is really good. Versus mode, however...

-- Steve

Sadly, the first time I tried M:tWG I ran straight into a griefer. Really ruined the experience for me.

With the amount of time and money that M:tWG and the expansion ties up, the Massively Multiplayer version can only be a grind-fest the likes of which we've never seen (and probably never want to).

wow. what a refreshingly bizarre game article! the escapist = not-skim milk

hey Lara, can i just suggest that an even "geekier" wedding would be to not give the life-sucking wedding industry a single fucking penny ... instead give all that money to people who desperately need it ... then just have a big party to celebrate your marriage (and how unbelievably generous and forward-thinking you are). send evites and make your color selections with html. paper (even newport blue paper) is for wanks.

Oh god. Aria di Mezzo Carattere.

Your wedding will be absolutely beautiful, regardless of anything else that's arranged or happens - as long as that song plays just before you tie the knot. Weddings are meaningless to me, in religion, in ceremony, and in "public declaration" - but I know yours will be beautiful, because you have a beautiful love and a truly beautiful theme for it.

Enjoy life in co-op mode. I hear it's better that way. :3

A friend of mine had the Portal's song playing while they cut the cake at her wedding, apparently her parents weren't all to pleased about that.

sammyfreak:
A friend of mine had the Portal's song playing while they cut the cake at her wedding, apparently her parents weren't all to pleased about that.

That's hilarious. For those that don't know the song, YouTube "portal still alive".

Wow i realy love this article ^^.

Summer of 2006 I was forced into helping my sister play the M:tWG expansion Babies without any of the gameplay of the actual Marriage game. It turns out my sister thought the expansion was a sequel, and interestingly enough you don't need the original game in order to run it.

It's quite an exhausting game that requires plenty of hours dedicated to it, but it's got one of the most interesting A.I.'s that you just can't get in games like Tamagotchi or Nintendogs. Not only does the sentient A.I. learn, but will often surprise you with its own revelations and teach you new things about yourself. Most educational gaming experience I've ever had.

Unfortunately I can't play the game at home, and the rest of the family keeps on playing the game without me, and my sister has determined no new games will be started until she finds a copy of M:tWG that works.

On the article: FF6 has the absolute best love story between Locke and Celes. No characters in any game come even close to such a realistic love and relationship story.

Whoa, I got a snowball rolling here. o_O

paulgruberman:
With the amount of time and money that M:tWG and the expansion ties up, the Massively Multiplayer version can only be a grind-fest the likes of which we've never seen (and probably never want to).

So THAT'S why the MM version (entitled Marriage III: Polygamy) isn't for sale here...

Novan Leon:
In today's society, people gravitate toward having multiple short pick-up and play sessions of LT rather taking part in single, longer and more difficult play sessions of M:tWG.

I don't mean to be rude, but you sound like a fanboy. There are plenty of people who play LT really hardcore, and conversely there are many others who treat M:tWG like a casual game.

Sylocat:

Novan Leon:
In today's society, people gravitate toward having multiple short pick-up and play sessions of LT rather taking part in single, longer and more difficult play sessions of M:tWG.

I don't mean to be rude, but you sound like a fanboy. There are plenty of people who play LT really hardcore, and conversely there are many others who treat M:tWG like a casual game.

True, but those kinds either always trade the game in, or they keep coming back reluctantly without figuring out they're playing the game wrong. Sometimes people skip the tutorial level (y'know, the one where you're out with your parents and they teach you how to play the game?), or they get a hand-me down that already has the tutorials turned off so they never learn how to play right. It's a shame, really.

Sylocat:

Novan Leon:
In today's society, people gravitate toward having multiple short pick-up and play sessions of LT rather taking part in single, longer and more difficult play sessions of M:tWG.

I don't mean to be rude, but you sound like a fanboy. There are plenty of people who play LT really hardcore, and conversely there are many others who treat M:tWG like a casual game.

You're right, but given that the penalty for quitting LT half-way through the game is negligible compared to the penalty for quitting M:tWG half-way through, sometimes I question how "hardcore" LT players really are *wink wink*. I agree that there are both cheaters and honest-to-goodness players in both games though, no argument there.

Personally I just spectate people playing both games. I'm too busy playing two other games, Life: The Ultimate Adventure and Career: Chronicles of the Workplace to begin playing another just yet.

Novan Leon:

Sylocat:

Novan Leon:
In today's society, people gravitate toward having multiple short pick-up and play sessions of LT rather taking part in single, longer and more difficult play sessions of M:tWG.

I don't mean to be rude, but you sound like a fanboy. There are plenty of people who play LT really hardcore, and conversely there are many others who treat M:tWG like a casual game.

You're right, but given that the penalty for quitting LT half-way through the game is negligible compared to the penalty for quitting M:tWG half-way through, sometimes I question how "hardcore" LT players really are *wink wink*.

If fear of penalty is what makes the difference between quitting and staying, then you're playing the game for the wrong reasons.

Sylocat:
If fear of penalty is what makes the difference between quitting and staying, then you're playing the game for the wrong reasons.

Agreed. Likewise, if fear of penalty is the deciding factor when choosing to play LT over M:tWG, then you're playing the game with the wrong attitude.

Novan Leon:

Sylocat:
If fear of penalty is what makes the difference between quitting and staying, then you're playing the game for the wrong reasons.

Agreed. Likewise, if fear of penalty is the deciding factor when choosing to play LT over M:tWG, then you're playing the game with the wrong attitude.

Well, maybe I misunderstood you, but it sounded to me like you were saying that choosing LT over M:tWG is THE yardstick of commitment, rather than just a question of personal religious and/or social beliefs. The way you phrased it sounded like you were saying that people who play LT aren't committed to their co-op partners, that smug "wink wink" you threw in at the end there sounded particularly self-righteous.

Sylocat:

Novan Leon:

Sylocat:
If fear of penalty is what makes the difference between quitting and staying, then you're playing the game for the wrong reasons.

Agreed. Likewise, if fear of penalty is the deciding factor when choosing to play LT over M:tWG, then you're playing the game with the wrong attitude.

Well, maybe I misunderstood you, but it sounded to me like you were saying that choosing LT over M:tWG is THE yardstick of commitment, rather than just a question of personal religious and/or social beliefs. The way you phrased it sounded like you were saying that people who play LT aren't committed to their co-op partners, that smug "wink wink" you threw in at the end there sounded particularly self-righteous.

Just relax. Your zealousness is beginning to break the metaphor which ruins all the fun. :)

Novan Leon:
Just relax. Your zealousness is beginning to break the metaphor which ruins all the fun. :)

I know, I know, I'm sorry.

I just think it's kind of backwards thinking. To me, inserting penalties for quitting is not a way to appeal to the hardcore gaming crowd. When people say, "M:tWG is better because it's harder to back out," that to me sounds like it's a game for people who are insecure about their buying decisions and want to put all those heavy penalties in place just to stop themselves from chickening out. I think a real test of commitment is a game where you CAN quit at any time, because it would mean you have to choose not to quit of your own free will, not just because the quit feature was removed.

As far as the article goes, I think there's a convenient leap made that you gotta have one for the other. And I don't think that's true. If it's really about the ceremony then there's no reason to be tied up in the fluff that is: getting people there, and getting them fed and drunk afterwards. My guess is - irrational as it may be - even the most cynical of us buy into the cliche at times and want it. Which is fine. There's nothing wrong with that. Even if we're effectively punching ourselves in the face to get there.

Good luck and enjoy! Based on all the wedding experiences I've had, you'll both think it was the best one ever. And more than likely 100% of the attendees will talk about something they didn't like on the ride home. Human nature rears it's ugly head.

As a jewish guy who has just opened his copy of M:tWG...err, got married on Sunday, I know exactly how you feel. While I did not have to pick shades of blue , I did have to decide between pasta and rice and whther we want silk "wings" on the Huppa.

The only thing I can tell you, Lara, is that it will indeed be over one day and that the little things are just that - little. Make sure you invite everyone you want there, make sure the food and music are good and just pick the cheapest of everything else :)

I kinda just want to wear the dress, thats not wrong of me is it?
Though seriousness, if I never get married, it wont reallt matter as long as Im with the man I love, which currently, I am. Ofcourse, we're the nerdy couple too, and I love how excited he gets when I show interest in the games/anime he likes, and I know I get carried away when I pile TES stuff on him. Im just waiting for him to get his Morrowind disc back from his brother.

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