177: The Vintage Game Preservation Society

 Pages PREV 1 2
 

BallPtPenTheif:

OuroborosChoked:

Please tell that to Congress. And the Supreme Court.

I don't think those people know how computers works, sort of a lost cause.

They don't know... exactly my point! Teach them!

BallPtPenTheif:

OuroborosChoked:

Please tell that to Congress. And the Supreme Court.

I don't think those people know how computers works, sort of a lost cause.

Look no further to see how the government understands the Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Series_of_tubes.

Playbahnosh:
and don't care about Mine Bombers, Shadow Warrior or Commander Keen.

Actually, you can get most of Commander Keen on Steam. For some weird (apparently legal) reason they're missing two of the episodes though.

A related update:

Malygris:
Home Of The Underdogs Goes Under

image

Home of the Underdogs, the most widely-recognized and enduring abandonware site on the net, is no more.

The bad news came in the form of a Twitter posted on February 9 by Underdogs founder Sarinee Achavanuntakul, who wrote, "Home of the Underdogs webhost went bankrupt T_T." The end came four days later, when HotU finally went offline. As Flash of Steel notes, the site's demise has been a long time coming; it was, perhaps a touch ironically, abandoned by Achavanuntakul, who last updated in 2006. But the game information, the reviews and the commentary all remained intact and it stayed a popular destination for people seeking out old and obscure games from days long ago.

Unlike conventional gaming sites, Home of the Underdogs was as much as museum as it was a download site, focusing exclusively on older and little-known games. Entries on the site typically included detailed information about the developer and publisher, system requirements, reviews, ratings and more, while various "how-tos" and links to old game manuals and related sites were also featured.

The site drew significant hits in its heyday, claiming more than 50,000 unique visitors daily and an average of over eight million page views per month. And although it was rescued from oblivion after briefly going offline in September 2008, that seems unlikely to happen again. Other abandonware sites will help ensure that the great history preserved by HotU remains accessible, but it's nonetheless a sad loss for gamers with a love for the classics.

Permalink

Moment of silence all around.

Abandonware? - isn't Monkey Island 1 and 2 available on the iPhone store? - loaded question because I bought it a few months ago :D
Prince of Persia is on the app store as well, I haven't bought that - I couldn't finish it in the 90's, I doubt I can finish it now.

These games are not abandonware.

Anyway, why mess around with clunky PC games, when there's a whole fricken universe of emulation. Really, if I want to play prince of persia, I'd load up STeem the Atari ST emulator and play it on that. If I want to play a point and click adventure, I'd use WinUAE the Amiga emulator, all the good click adventures were released on the Amiga. Then there's the SNES and Genesis for all those 2D classics, and MAME for all those arcade classics. All free, and more justified than abandonware, because none of those games are available commercially and the game in it's raw form is protected somewhat. I mean, abandonware means the original game is hacked, and presented in it's original form pretty much.

The truth is though that retro gaming is often disapointing - games never look quite as good as they did 20 years ago, old fashioned TV's spared us from a lot of horrors. If you look at a Bitmap Bros game for instance, in the 90's it was hard to believe they only had 16 colours on the ST, these days though you see every bit of stippling, the TV isn't providing anti-aliasing anymore, and no effect or filter can do as good a job as an old TV or an arcade VDU at blending pixels nicely. It's like waking up and noticing your wifes pretty face is actually made from Lego. Maybe that's why I don't get these new retro games that pixelate everything, pixels are cool these days, like that Bit Trip Runner game - yet we didn't see pixels back then, we saw ninjas and pirates just like we see in modern games. I think that's some of the reason why Braid did so well... it's not that it's just a pretty game, it's more like how we remember games like that. Put it next to Magic Pockets from 20 years ago, and I'd struggle to choose which one has better visuals.

 Pages PREV 1 2

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here