Metal Monsters: Mechs From Gundam to Pacific Rim

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GundamSentinel:
I still curse the Japanese for keeping all the best games to themselves. Why won't they let me play Another Century's Episode? Instead I'll have to do with crap like Dynasty Warriors Gundam and Gundam Crossfire (even those, I might add, can be hard to come by here, and even then very expensive).

Licensing. Case in point: When Project X Zone was brought over, they had to re-get the rights to every single character in the series. And I'm betting the only reason they did it was because they only had about three companies to work from.

With anime, on the other hand, the rights are often already held by multiple companies outside of Japan. The closest we could have gotten so far for the Super Robot Wars series outside of the Original Generation games was Super Robot Wars W, and that would've had like five or six companies to deal with (it would've been about three or four had ADV still been around).

Saulkar:
HEAVY GEAR! Unlike Battletech which suffered from legal battles with outright ripping off Japanese mech designs, DP9 managed to do it with a world and mech designs iconically unique enough to never have to fear legal repercussions from whomever it was that held the legal rights to Votom.

RatherDull:

I mean seriously, I love Gundam... but there is WAY more to Mecha than just Gundam... hell the amount to which this article under-represented Macross is practically criminal! Most of Battletechs original Mech Designs were flat out stolen from Macross and Fang of the Sun Dougram, without those two series's would Battletech and hence Mechwarrior ever have become a thing? Geez man...

I've trying to type a reply for the past hour or so on FASA's legal woes that's as correct as possible but not sounding like a total fanboy.....and not really succeeding. But I did find this blog post that explains the situation far better than anything I tried to write.

However, FASA did have a license to use those mecha designs in their work, or at the very least they had the impression they did. There is some question over whether the company they licensed them from actually had the rights to do so. But in any case they didn't (intend to) infringe on anyone's copyright. Of course unless you mean that in a 'didn't produce original material of their own' manner, well I can't really argue with that.

In addition, the BattleTech wiki page states that the Playmates suit made them feel vulnerable to future suits of this nature. As a result, they voluntarily stopped using licensed images and only used ones created in house. I don't know if that happened before or after the harmony Gold suit was settled, but even if they stopped using Macross stuff as part of the settlement, they dumped the Dougram and Crusher Joe mechs to cover their bases. That's why the rules stayed, but the pictures went.

Mazinger Z only attracted modest popularity? Who the hell wrote this stupid article?! Mazinger Z is popular enough in Japan to warrant spin-off OVAs (Mazinkaiser), a reboot (Shin Mazinger Z), and regular inclusion in the Super Robot Wars game franchise. Mazinger Z and all the other super robot shows were highly popular in Asia, Europe and Latin America. Ask any Filipino right now, and he can sing the theme to Voltes V on command.

Anyway, the fact that this article glosses over the rather prolific Super Robot subgenre is astounding, considering that Pacific Rim is itself a Super Robot film, with the flimsiest trappings of the Real Robot genre.
Then there's the fact that the other Real Robot franchise, Macross (aka Robotech), gets a one-time name drop, and only as a reference to BattleTech.

This article is basically "Gundams, now vidjagames, now Pacific Rim!" which is just as worse as the idiots who think that Pacific Rim's only influence was Evangelion.

romxxii:
Mazinger Z only attracted modest popularity? Who the hell wrote this stupid article?! Mazinger Z is popular enough in Japan to warrant spin-off OVAs (Mazinkaiser), a reboot (Shin Mazinger Z), and regular inclusion in the Super Robot Wars game franchise. Mazinger Z and all the other super robot shows were highly popular in Asia, Europe and Latin America. Ask any Filipino right now, and he can sing the theme to Voltes V on command.

Anyway, the fact that this article glosses over the rather prolific Super Robot subgenre is astounding, considering that Pacific Rim is itself a Super Robot film, with the flimsiest trappings of the Real Robot genre.
Then there's the fact that the other Real Robot franchise, Macross (aka Robotech), gets a one-time name drop, and only as a reference to BattleTech.

This article is basically "Gundams, now vidjagames, now Pacific Rim!" which is just as worse as the idiots who think that Pacific Rim's only influence was Evangelion.

Thanks for your feedback! I'm sorry that I glossed over a lot of the Super Robot stuff, but this article's focus was meant to be on mechs in Videogames, and the games which i specifically talk about are usually based on the Real Robot genre!

SAMAS:

GundamSentinel:
I still curse the Japanese for keeping all the best games to themselves. Why won't they let me play Another Century's Episode? Instead I'll have to do with crap like Dynasty Warriors Gundam and Gundam Crossfire (even those, I might add, can be hard to come by here, and even then very expensive).

Licensing. Case in point: When Project X Zone was brought over, they had to re-get the rights to every single character in the series. And I'm betting the only reason they did it was because they only had about three companies to work from.

With anime, on the other hand, the rights are often already held by multiple companies outside of Japan. The closest we could have gotten so far for the Super Robot Wars series outside of the Original Generation games was Super Robot Wars W, and that would've had like five or six companies to deal with (it would've been about three or four had ADV still been around).

Yep, which is also the reason why even if a game gets ported outside Japan, it often doesn't have the original music. The market is just too niche for people to really care, more's the pity for us.

Alright, everyone, point any bother at me. Steven assuredly wrote about your favorite, various important mech and mecha games and series, as well as talked about semantics re: mech and mecha, along with boatloads of other history in earlier drafts.

I am the evil editor that threw completeness under the bus in the name of readability and word count.

In short: Sorry, not sorry.

Steven Bogos:

SAMAS:
Snip

Hi there!

Thanks for your feedback. Unfortunately, when writing my article there was a lot of stuff I had to cut. I ended up going with what I deemed was the most popular, highest quality, and/or most influential series and games.

I do understand that. My only real complaint is that in the search for popularity, you may have sacrificed accuracy. Gundam may be more well-known to non-mecha fans, but the only thing it has to do with Pacific Rim or it's tropes is the fact that both feature robots with two feet. Gundam is usually a war story, with sympathetic villains, total assholes on the heroes' side, senseless deaths, and generally a struggle of Man vs. Man. It's what's known as a Real Robot series.

Pacific Rim, with it's alien invasions, giant monsters of varying shapes and abilities attacking at near-regular intervals usually one at a time, clear lines of Hero and Villain, collection of all-unique mecha, and over-the-top characters is completely in line with the Super Robot genre, which is the territory of shows like Mazinger, Voltron (which had a continuation/reboot fairly recently), Neon Genesis Evangelion, Megas XLR (a Western example), and the recent (and gone far too soon) Sym-Bionic Titan (also Western).

Pacific Rim's lineage goes:

War of the Worlds
Tetsujin 28
Godzilla
Mazinger Z
*whole bunch of series'*
Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla II
Neon Genesis Evangelion
*some more series'*
Pacific Rim

Gundam is the great-uncle that split off from Mazinger somewhere down the line. He's in the family, but not in a direct line.

SAMAS:
SNIP

Thanks for taking the time to read my reply and type out your own. As for the Pacific Rim stuff, I completely agree with you. The focus of my piece, however, was meant to be on mechs in videogames, which is why I focused on the Real Robot genre. The Pacific Rim sections were actually added in later drafts of the piece to make it more topical, as the movie had just come out.

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