The Future of Movies (Maybe)

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 NEXT
 

chikusho:

Silverspetz:

People will still go to the theatre for the experience of it. There is just something massively different about seeing a movie in the theatre as opposed to your own living room or on your computer. The popcorn, the seats, the size of the room and the screen and even the presence of other people there watching it with you (for good or for ill) just creates this atmosphere that a home-theatre system just won't match...EVER.

Aside from that it just isn't practically feasible that home-entertainment systems will be able to replace theatres even if they could deliver the exact same experience. Not everyone has the money to buy one of those things, and far fewer has the extra space necessary to set it up. The size is a big part of the theatre experience so if home-entertainment is ever going to even have a chance of replicating it the space IS necessary.

You can emulate a huge theater screen just fine with an Oculus Rift. Buying one of those can get you infinite cinema experiences for $300, and it only takes up space that your head is already occupying.

I think it's more of a social-thing than a technical-thing. Sure we may be able to emulate a cinematic experience and -if you're fortunate enough- afford a better home-theatre system than your local theatre but it's still artificial compared to physically going outside the house with a bunch of mates/your family and having a good time. The two biggest markets for films, can't be bothered getting figures right now sorry, are teens and families as evident by emphasis on film-makers getting a PG-13 rating and for a recent example, the abundance of super-hero movies. This is for a reason, because they are the groups that are most likely to go out to watch a movie.

If you were to ask a group of teens what they'd do to 'hang-out' I guarantee going out to catch a movie would come up often. Ask the same for families and even couples.

Varya:
Ya know Bob, I've long been interested to have you go see a movie in Sweden, I'd be curious to see your reaction. In Sweden, I've seen someone texting like once, and never had to even see someone desperately trying to turn of the sound to their phone as someone is calling them mid-movie. The last time I was mildly annoyed at the movies were when some kids behind me tended to snicker to loudly at inappropriate times. People talking in theaters is virtually non-existing, the most you can expect is some banter during the trailers.

I live in Britain and the same applies here, most of the time. I've been to the cinema a couple of times in the US, and if that became the norm over here, I would never go to the cinema again.

Whenever I read about your (or other people from US) frustration with movie-going, I get eternally thankful for this country and our civil and structured way of life.

I feel exactly the same way.

Falseprophet:

the antithesis:
Here's a thing about 3D: it doesn't work. For all the work and technological advances, 3D still doesn't look like real life. Not even close.

You don't experience real-life in 24-30 frames per second either, but movies and TV have been shown that way for almost a century, and everyone was pretty cool with it.

If 10% of the population felt discomfort when watching 24-30 FPS and the illusion of motion was reduced to keep that number from being larger, then you would have a point.

Nouw:
I think it's more of a social-thing than a technical-thing.

I don't know about that. How many people talk to strangers at a movie theater? A bunch of people in the same place at the same time isn't necessarily a social experience. Otherwise the theater is competing more with crowded buses than home theaters. It used to be that people would socialize with strangers at theaters, I suppose. But that isn't the case anymore.

While I think these ideas are alright and pushing the service in some ways I don't see any profit in a lot of them. I mean why would I implement a new technology for a dozen people every other showing to have it in their native language without disturbing others?

I agree with your digital movies and that you will probably see a hard copy of the movie phase out however you will not get streaming in theatres any time soon. They may download a digitally tagged copy of the film legally via a private network to use in the theatre but they wouldn't stream just yet or in the next 30 years I don't think.

One thing I didn't see you mention which I thought would have been a no brainer would have been more integration with the community. For example people could sign up at their local cinema saying they're interested in a certain film and would like for there to be at least one prime time showing of it a week. One of the hardest things I've found is trying to get a time that 13 people can go to. If the film starts between 6:30pm and 7:30pm it's easy, anything after that and you might as well start herding wasps.

You mentioned about phones and accepting that they can and will be part of the film going experience. Well here are the 2 main reasons I no longer go to the cinema. 1) For the price of 2 tickets I can buy the film on blu-ray, when it comes out (when it's it's most expensive), and watch it as many times as I like + bonuses. 2) All those other people talking, slurping, texting, phoning and generally being annoying. I can get a similar (better imho) experience at home with my 3D monitor, surround sound and comfy seats. So no, phones and cinema can stick to being on silent or risk taking a one way trip down the toilet.

I really like going to the cinema, for all it's problems, but at the moment it's just too expensive. Unless the theatre starts finding ways to cut the price and increase the service I think they're gonna start losing out to the over-compensating for something TV market.

Personally I do not see streaming becoming a thing for movie theaters for some time yet, not without a massive jump in internet technology. The amount of data in 2k and 4k movies that no longer use film is huge, these movies are already transported on HDDs. It would be difficult for some theaters to download more than one at a time let alone stream them, 8k screen resolutions are the next step too shifting the goalposts even further.

Like the post above me claims, I belive streaming is still far off, both because the data for the films will probably keep increasing and because they'll want to have the film before it starts showing. Don't know about you, but if the film pauzes to download more halfway through the movie because the dl rate was a bit slow for one reason or another, I wouldn't go to theaters anymore.
It's just so much safer to have a complete copy ready and then show it.
Downloading the films instead of transporting them by hard disc probably will happen.

http://www.somethingpositive.net/sp03272002.shtml

The only answer to a cell phone in a theater, whether live or movie. :D

Nouw:

chikusho:

Silverspetz:

People will still go to the theatre for the experience of it. There is just something massively different about seeing a movie in the theatre as opposed to your own living room or on your computer. The popcorn, the seats, the size of the room and the screen and even the presence of other people there watching it with you (for good or for ill) just creates this atmosphere that a home-theatre system just won't match...EVER.

Aside from that it just isn't practically feasible that home-entertainment systems will be able to replace theatres even if they could deliver the exact same experience. Not everyone has the money to buy one of those things, and far fewer has the extra space necessary to set it up. The size is a big part of the theatre experience so if home-entertainment is ever going to even have a chance of replicating it the space IS necessary.

You can emulate a huge theater screen just fine with an Oculus Rift. Buying one of those can get you infinite cinema experiences for $300, and it only takes up space that your head is already occupying.

I think it's more of a social-thing than a technical-thing. Sure we may be able to emulate a cinematic experience and -if you're fortunate enough- afford a better home-theatre system than your local theatre but it's still artificial compared to physically going outside the house with a bunch of mates/your family and having a good time. The two biggest markets for films, can't be bothered getting figures right now sorry, are teens and families as evident by emphasis on film-makers getting a PG-13 rating and for a recent example, the abundance of super-hero movies. This is for a reason, because they are the groups that are most likely to go out to watch a movie.

If you were to ask a group of teens what they'd do to 'hang-out' I guarantee going out to catch a movie would come up often. Ask the same for families and even couples.

I agree with what you're saying about the social aspect, but I'd like to add this to the home theater thing: it's not as expensive as you might think. I'd stack up the sound end of my system with even the local Liemax screen (real 70mm Imax is another story, as is the picture), let alone the average multiplex screen, and the whole system cost about what a new console would, except I spread it out of a period of five years or so. You can get amazing sound for a very low entry price, the trick is having the patience to find what you need inexpensively. My mains, for example, are an old set of towers I found in a thrift shop, $20 for the pair. Not high end by any means, but I can guarantee you they're better than what most people have in their "home theater," and they cost a lot less, to boot.

the antithesis:

Nouw:
I think it's more of a social-thing than a technical-thing.

I don't know about that. How many people talk to strangers at a movie theater? A bunch of people in the same place at the same time isn't necessarily a social experience. Otherwise the theater is competing more with crowded buses than home theaters. It used to be that people would socialize with strangers at theaters, I suppose. But that isn't the case anymore.

Socializing isn't by any means restricted to strangers. It's with a group of people you know whether they be your family, friends, work colleagues and etc. Sure you could always strike up a conversation with a stranger at the cinema but that isn't really what I mean when I say socialize. To socialize in this context isn't to meet new people and befriend them but rather to talk, interact and have a good time.

Owyn_Merrilin:
I agree with what you're saying about the social aspect, but I'd like to add this to the home theater thing: it's not as expensive as you might think. I'd stack up the sound end of my system with even the local Liemax screen (real 70mm Imax is another story, as is the picture), let alone the average multiplex screen, and the whole system cost about what a new console would, except I spread it out of a period of five years or so. You can get amazing sound for a very low entry price, the trick is having the patience to find what you need inexpensively. My mains, for example, are an old set of towers I found in a thrift shop, $20 for the pair. Not high end by any means, but I can guarantee you they're better than what most people have in their "home theater," and they cost a lot less, to boot.

Hmmm my only concern then is who, or rather how many people, could be bothered to put that much effort into making their own home theatre when the option of going out is cheaper and easier, in the short-run at least. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to have my own home theatre system and I'd actively encourage it but I still think the market for people who believe otherwise is still quite strong.

I've always thought it was expensive and generally more trouble than its worth. Thanks for enlightening me ^_^.

Its too over priced.
Going the cinema later today and dreading it.
Cant wait til the day new releases come straight to home

madigan:
I'm kind of surprised Bob didn't mention the growing trend of movie theatre grills/restaurants. That is, movie theatres with table space in front of the rows of chairs and full food/drink menus available. I've seen places do it old-school style where you order your food and drinks outside the theatre and then bring them in and find a seat, and others (like Alamo Drafthouse and Studio Movie Grill) where you write your order down on a provided card or slip of paper (there are dim lights under the table-top so you can see the menu and your own order card once the movie actually starts) and waiters come by every now and then before and during the film to pickup orders, drop off food, re-fill beverages, and drop off/pick up bills.

It's a pretty great system that didn't exist in my area before the turn of the millennium, and I still run into people all of the time who have never heard of or consider going to a theatre that serves full meals (and alcohol!) during the showing.

*shrugs*

Iv'e never heard of that . But isn't it distracting to have people come a take orders/food during the movie?

Nouw:
Socializing isn't by any means restricted to strangers. It's with a group of people you know whether they be your family, friends, work colleagues and etc. Sure you could always strike up a conversation with a stranger at the cinema but that isn't really what I mean when I say socialize. To socialize in this context isn't to meet new people and befriend them but rather to talk, interact and have a good time.

And this is something you can easily do in your home. People do this all the time, actually. So I'm still not seeing the appeal of a movie theater.

chikusho:

Silverspetz:

People will still go to the theatre for the experience of it. There is just something massively different about seeing a movie in the theatre as opposed to your own living room or on your computer. The popcorn, the seats, the size of the room and the screen and even the presence of other people there watching it with you (for good or for ill) just creates this atmosphere that a home-theatre system just won't match...EVER.

Aside from that it just isn't practically feasible that home-entertainment systems will be able to replace theatres even if they could deliver the exact same experience. Not everyone has the money to buy one of those things, and far fewer has the extra space necessary to set it up. The size is a big part of the theatre experience so if home-entertainment is ever going to even have a chance of replicating it the space IS necessary.

You can emulate a huge theater screen just fine with an Oculus Rift. Buying one of those can get you infinite cinema experiences for $300, and it only takes up space that your head is already occupying.

Still not at all the same. Part of the cinema experience is the size of the room as much as the screen, not to mention the people around you. Simply fooling your brain into thinking that it is looking at a bigger screen than it really is will never compare.

the antithesis:

Nouw:
I think it's more of a social-thing than a technical-thing.

I don't know about that. How many people talk to strangers at a movie theater? A bunch of people in the same place at the same time isn't necessarily a social experience. Otherwise the theater is competing more with crowded buses than home theaters. It used to be that people would socialize with strangers at theaters, I suppose. But that isn't the case anymore.

The social experience of moviegoing goes beyond simply socializing with people you know. It is the fact that there are other people AROUND you, watching the movie with you, sharing an interest in real-time that makes it a social experience, even if you don't talk with any other people at all. And yes, you can find new people to socialize with by going to the theatre too. It happens all the time.

Heck, just the fact that you have to get out of your house and GO somewhere makes the cinema a vastly different movie-experience than any kind of home-delivery system. And I'm not saying any of those are bad, just saying that it will never be the same as going to an actual theatre.

Pyrian:

chikusho:
You can emulate a huge theater screen just fine with an Oculus Rift.

No, you can't. Even the consumer version simply doesn't have the resolution. You'll be looking at it through a screen door, as they say.

Actually they already have a working HD version, it just hasn't been released yet (even through the beta program).

But I still don't think a bunch of people sitting at home wearing oculuses (oculii?) is the same as a movie theatre experience.

Steve the Pocket:

Yeah, well, Swedes are probably just better people than Americans. One day I'd like to study the cultures that are Just Better than America, like Sweden and Canada, and figure out just what's up with that. Maybe it's the cold weather. People can't work up the energy to be an asshole when they're too cold all the time. That would also explain why people from the South are so much worse.

In all likelihood you'll just discover their assholery manifests in different ways.

Nouw:

chikusho:

Silverspetz:

People will still go to the theatre for the experience of it. There is just something massively different about seeing a movie in the theatre as opposed to your own living room or on your computer. The popcorn, the seats, the size of the room and the screen and even the presence of other people there watching it with you (for good or for ill) just creates this atmosphere that a home-theatre system just won't match...EVER.

Aside from that it just isn't practically feasible that home-entertainment systems will be able to replace theatres even if they could deliver the exact same experience. Not everyone has the money to buy one of those things, and far fewer has the extra space necessary to set it up. The size is a big part of the theatre experience so if home-entertainment is ever going to even have a chance of replicating it the space IS necessary.

You can emulate a huge theater screen just fine with an Oculus Rift. Buying one of those can get you infinite cinema experiences for $300, and it only takes up space that your head is already occupying.

I think it's more of a social-thing than a technical-thing. Sure we may be able to emulate a cinematic experience and -if you're fortunate enough- afford a better home-theatre system than your local theatre but it's still artificial compared to physically going outside the house with a bunch of mates/your family and having a good time. The two biggest markets for films, can't be bothered getting figures right now sorry, are teens and families as evident by emphasis on film-makers getting a PG-13 rating and for a recent example, the abundance of super-hero movies. This is for a reason, because they are the groups that are most likely to go out to watch a movie.

If you were to ask a group of teens what they'd do to 'hang-out' I guarantee going out to catch a movie would come up often. Ask the same for families and even couples.

That's the beauty of the occulus rift. It's just the start, an early prototype that already gives people the feeling they're in an open room looking at a large screen. It wouldn't take a ton to get people with realistic enough avatars and incorporating the ability to talk to each other to meet a lot of the requirements of a social event. Again, there are a lot of downsides to going to see a movie in a public place. But imagine if you and your group of friends were sitting on couches in your own house watching the movie? Is that significantly different from seeing a movie in theaters?

I'd say that a movie is nice when you actually want to get out of the house and do something when not much else is available. It's one of those safe bets where even if you didn't like the movie you at least feel like you did something with your time.

SnowWookie:

Pyrian:

chikusho:
You can emulate a huge theater screen just fine with an Oculus Rift.

No, you can't. Even the consumer version simply doesn't have the resolution. You'll be looking at it through a screen door, as they say.

Actually they already have a working HD version...

Yeah, the consumer version I mentioned. 1080p. That won't render the screen in fidelity, nevermind the theatre environment.

Silverspetz:

Still not at all the same. Part of the cinema experience is the size of the room as much as the screen, not to mention the people around you. Simply fooling your brain into thinking that it is looking at a bigger screen than it really is will never compare.

An Oculus could just as easily emulate a larger room as well, but you're right. It will never compare. For some people it will be superior. Hell, part of the reason so many are investing in super huge TV's and massive surround sound systems is to get away from as much of the bullshit "movie experience" as possible with the actual movie still intact. Getting away from noisy, talking, phone fiddling people; dirty, sticky floors; poor view from seats at the edge of the theater; supporting lobby organization making the customer the villain; being forced to watch commercials even though you paid to see a movie and still getting shilled on the prices of tickets and popcorn.

Personally I hope that enough people will get fed up with the movie theater industry that it dies a slow terrible death.

Lightknight:

Nouw:
I think it's more of a social-thing than a technical-thing. Sure we may be able to emulate a cinematic experience and -if you're fortunate enough- afford a better home-theatre system than your local theatre but it's still artificial compared to physically going outside the house with a bunch of mates/your family and having a good time. The two biggest markets for films, can't be bothered getting figures right now sorry, are teens and families as evident by emphasis on film-makers getting a PG-13 rating and for a recent example, the abundance of super-hero movies. This is for a reason, because they are the groups that are most likely to go out to watch a movie.

If you were to ask a group of teens what they'd do to 'hang-out' I guarantee going out to catch a movie would come up often. Ask the same for families and even couples.

That's the beauty of the occulus rift. It's just the start, an early prototype that already gives people the feeling they're in an open room looking at a large screen. It wouldn't take a ton to get people with realistic enough avatars and incorporating the ability to talk to each other to meet a lot of the requirements of a social event. Again, there are a lot of downsides to going to see a movie in a public place. But imagine if you and your group of friends were sitting on couches in your own house watching the movie? Is that significantly different from seeing a movie in theaters?

I'd say that a movie is nice when you actually want to get out of the house and do something when not much else is available. It's one of those safe bets where even if you didn't like the movie you at least feel like you did something with your time.

At this point I can't really explain it as well as say, a sociologist/psychologist could. I do find the prospect of a future where traditional social values is further challenged to be interesting however. It will be like when communication through calling, texting, e-mailing, IM'ing and face-timing was introduced. I think while it will have a market, most people will prefer to go for the real thing but I'm not qualified to say that :P. Perhaps one day we will never even leave the house and interact purely through the technology available to us *shrugs.* As a growing teen myself I would absolutely loathe that. It'd feel so fake and anti-social and considering my peers put even more emphasis on 'socializing' I really don't think it'll take off at least now for a long, long time.

the antithesis:

Nouw:
Socializing isn't by any means restricted to strangers. It's with a group of people you know whether they be your family, friends, work colleagues and etc. Sure you could always strike up a conversation with a stranger at the cinema but that isn't really what I mean when I say socialize. To socialize in this context isn't to meet new people and befriend them but rather to talk, interact and have a good time.

And this is something you can easily do in your home. People do this all the time, actually. So I'm still not seeing the appeal of a movie theater.

Refer to Silver's response which is pretty much what I would have written anyway. Going outside, being in the presence of others. You may not personally enjoy that or understand its appeal but as I said before, families and teens do and they're a massive movie market. Now whether or not society should leave behind these social values is an interesting question and with the introduction of the Occulus Rift it may soon become the next big controversy/challenge for us to overcome.

The only reason I've ever heard that movie studios aren't already distributing movies digitally lies in the fact that they have to keep that artificial gulf between the theater release and the retail release. If all movies were just digital, why bother with releasing to theaters at all?

So basically the horror show of Lucas fixing the "Han Shot First" debate is going to become the norm? Can't wait for that mess.

CelestDaer:
The only reason I've ever heard that movie studios aren't already distributing movies digitally lies in the fact that they have to keep that artificial gulf between the theater release and the retail release. If all movies were just digital, why bother with releasing to theaters at all?

Especially if you have decent hackers or someone swipes the disk - bootlegging will practically become pointless.

Nouw:
At this point I can't really explain it as well as say, a sociologist/psychologist could. I do find the prospect of a future where traditional social values is further challenged to be interesting however. It will be like when communication through calling, texting, e-mailing, IM'ing and face-timing was introduced. I think while it will have a market, most people will prefer to go for the real thing but I'm not qualified to say that :P. Perhaps one day we will never even leave the house and interact purely through the technology available to us *shrugs.* As a growing teen myself I would absolutely loathe that. It'd feel so fake and anti-social and considering my peers put even more emphasis on 'socializing' I really don't think it'll take off at least now for a long, long time.

I'm sure most of us would agree that direct interaction would be preferred. But this could even be done directly in your house sitting next to them and this is only one event. To be honest, going to the movies is one of the least social events you can do. A group of people sitting in mostly silence while watching a screen. Why not do this in the comfort of your own home if possible?

Can the Occulus rift really create a theatre experience? And is it really only $300? I might actually get one then. Hook it up to my xbox or something

2013 has been a BAD movie year in my opinion. The symptoms of 'the formula' are beginning to become terminal. i.e. the logic that a studio can only make a successful movie out of an existing property based on a setup that has 'worked' (been profitable) before.

I've seen less movies in the theater than ever before. I'm a die-hard film fan and even I'm losing the will to go to see movies on release. It takes EFFORT to muster up the enthusiasm to go to see a film. The Cinema experience has never been so enjoyable or expensive. Even with discounts at a nowhere time of day it still cost over £10 to see pacific rim in 3D (i even brought my own glasses). That's Blu-ray money.

krazykidd:

madigan:
I'm kind of surprised Bob didn't mention the growing trend of movie theatre grills/restaurants. That is, movie theatres with table space in front of the rows of chairs and full food/drink menus available. I've seen places do it old-school style where you order your food and drinks outside the theatre and then bring them in and find a seat, and others (like Alamo Drafthouse and Studio Movie Grill) where you write your order down on a provided card or slip of paper (there are dim lights under the table-top so you can see the menu and your own order card once the movie actually starts) and waiters come by every now and then before and during the film to pickup orders, drop off food, re-fill beverages, and drop off/pick up bills.

It's a pretty great system that didn't exist in my area before the turn of the millennium, and I still run into people all of the time who have never heard of or consider going to a theatre that serves full meals (and alcohol!) during the showing.

*shrugs*

Iv'e never heard of that . But isn't it distracting to have people come a take orders/food during the movie?

For the Alamo Drafthouse at least, once the movie starts the "servers" only come by if you put an order card up and to drop off the bill at the end, and there's an aisle for them to move in (they stoop while they walk to not obstruct your view) on the other side of the table so they don't have to skooch past customer's knees. They just grab the order card and leave without bothering you unless you want to tell them something. The Alamo Drafthouse also lets the audience in and find seats some 45 minutes prior to the movie starting, and they also provide relevant pre-show entertainment while the house lights are still up. For example, when I went to see Pacific Rim they showed clips from Godzilla, Mothra, N.G.E., Power Rangers, etc. in the 45 minutes leading up to the start of the feature film, as well as relevant pop-culture clips from Youtube, Blip, College Humour, etc. During the pre-show period the servers come by to each guest as they sit down and explain the order card system and generally act how normal servers would in any other restaurant. The Alamo theatres then run a short, catchy clip on the main screen as the lights go down explaining the whole system before they move only preview trailers.

All in all it's a pretty well-oiled machine, and the Studio Movie Grill seems to have copied quite a bit from the Alamo from the few times I've visited their theatres in the past couple of years.

Nouw:
Going outside, being in the presence of others.

But if you're not interacting, what's the point? It may as well be the bus or the line at the bank. I hesitate to even call this socializing since the idea is to interact as little as possible. Try not to look at one another and only acknowledge one another if it's absolutely necessary. I don't see this as desirable for anyone.

You'd mention teens, and that may be where theater will continue to find an audience. Teens don't really have a space to call their own. They may have a room and such, but this area is largely controlled by their parents, so they desire to get away from that to be a bit more free when out with their friends. Of course, it's been this way since the 50's when teens started to have disposable income to spend on things like cars and movie tickets. I don't know how long that can continue, but it's possible that teens will either find something else to do with their time or the costs will outweigh the profits. Arcades used to be a popular hang out for teens, but they're all but gone, with only a few places still in operation and no major chains that I'm aware of. They might still exist, but the last time I saw an arcade they didn't have any games I really wanted to play.

...and with the introduction of the Occulus Rift it may soon become the next big controversy/challenge for us to overcome.

I don't think the Occulus Rift offers anything but an empty hand. But that's beyond our scope here.

harrisonmcgiggins:
Can the Occulus rift really create a theatre experience? And is it really only $300? I might actually get one then. Hook it up to my xbox or something

The Occulus Rift has a lot of neat stuff being produced right now but I wouldn't jump the gun if I were you. It carries all the risks that being an early adopter of anything else would carry. Including the very next version being 100x better. Also, please keep in mind that the $300 option you're looking at is a Dev kit. It is not the consumer version. The dev kit will be rougher and potentially more expensive than the eventual client version and we don't even know if it'll be compatible with apps available on the final version. From the site's FAQ:

http://www.oculusvr.com/faq/

I'm not a developer. Should I buy a developer kit now or wait for the consumer version?

If you are asking this question, the answer is most likely "Wait".

The consumer product will improve on almost every aspect of the developer kit, which is essentially an early prototype of the consumer version. This includes comfort, immersion, features, software support, etc... for the absolute best virtual reality experience possible.

If you absolutely must have one, please understand that the developer kits are more or less early prototypes of the consumer version and with very limited software/game support when they ship.

So if you're not a developer or hardcore enthusiast, sit tight for now. We promise the consumer Rift will be worth the wait!

But to answer your question, yes, they have developed an application that makes the user feel like they're looking at a much larger screen and that also gives the impression of space. The biggest complaint at the moment is actually just the screen resolution which is supposed to be 1080p for the consumer version but I believe is 720 for the dev kit. So you can get the screen door effect if you move your head around a lot.

To begin with, the Rift is only compatible with the pc. They do plan on making it compatible with the consoles soon though. But this means you couldn't plug it into your 360 and it work, at least not yet though someone may have modded it to work. This is a product to be excited about but I would try to forget it exists until a consumer model exists.

the antithesis:
I don't think the Occulus Rift offers anything but an empty hand. But that's beyond our scope here.

You mean no controller? No, you still need a controller to play several types of games but not all. I think the occulus rift offers a lot more than just an open hand. The ability to look around the world is the first major advancement in ACTUAL game immersion (as opposed this graphical immersion people talk about). It really is different to be able to look around your area like you can in real life. That movie theater app? It gives the illusion of actual space. An empty room in front of a large screen. That really is something novel.

The ability to actually put yourself in an environment even just optically causes some interesting things.

Here's some reactions to some types of apps that are being developed for it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjNLvgqZgUI

Keep in mind that Team Fortress 2, Hawken, and Doom 3 are are all playable on it if you're a gamer like me.

Lightknight:

the antithesis:
I don't think the Occulus Rift offers anything but an empty hand.

You mean no controller?

I thought he meant pr0n. XD

Lightknight:
The ability to look around the world is the first major advancement in ACTUAL game immersion (as opposed this graphical immersion people talk about).

Discussing the Occulus Rift and its virtues or lack thereof is better left to another thread, but suffice to say that I think the Occulus Rift is the uncanny valley of display technology the same way someone once said that motion controls are the uncanny valley of input devices.

I find the movie theater app idea to be like the menus on some retro compilations that that are like being in a 70's or 80's bedroom and you have to sift through the cartridges to play them. This sort of thing can fuck right off, get the fuck out of my way and let me play the fucking games. The problem with novelty is that it is paper thin, shallow and substanceless. Hence why novelty tends to wear off pretty fast, before the kickstarted Android console even gets into the hands of backers, much less onto store shelves. So a movie theater app on the Occulus Rift can fuck right off, get the fuck out of my way and let me watch the fucking movie.

As far the phone usage thing goes, I'm going to resist this push to the last.

Meanwhile I'll just sit smugly knowing that people who use their phones in the theater are going to the special hell

chikusho:

Silverspetz:

Still not at all the same. Part of the cinema experience is the size of the room as much as the screen, not to mention the people around you. Simply fooling your brain into thinking that it is looking at a bigger screen than it really is will never compare.

An Oculus could just as easily emulate a larger room as well, but you're right. It will never compare. For some people it will be superior. Hell, part of the reason so many are investing in super huge TV's and massive surround sound systems is to get away from as much of the bullshit "movie experience" as possible with the actual movie still intact. Getting away from noisy, talking, phone fiddling people; dirty, sticky floors; poor view from seats at the edge of the theater; supporting lobby organization making the customer the villain; being forced to watch commercials even though you paid to see a movie and still getting shilled on the prices of tickets and popcorn.

Personally I hope that enough people will get fed up with the movie theater industry that it dies a slow terrible death.

And for some people it will never be anything but a hollow imitation of the real thing. I don't know what wretched theatres you have in your neighborhood, but my movie-going experience usually involves people turning off their cellphones before the viewing (I can only remember 1 notable time when someone just wouldn't put it down), the floors are usually clear as can be with the exception of an occasional popcorn and some salt sprinkled about, and the personal have always been helpful and serviceable. And I quite like the commercials and trailers honestly. There is something that just gets you all the more hyped about seeing a movie that looks like it will be good when you see the trailer in theatres than it is to see them during some commercial break on regular TV or in some clip on Youtube.

My point is that for better or for worse I don't agree that home-entertainment systems will ever be able to deliver the SAME experience as cinema only with the bad parts cut out. There are just too many variables of the experience as a whole that involves GETTING OUT OF YOUR HOUSE and interacting with other people on some level for it ever to be accurately emulated by some little machine. Whether you LIKE those other variables or if they are something you personally would rather just avoid is a completely different matter.

the antithesis:

Nouw:
Going outside, being in the presence of others.

But if you're not interacting, what's the point? It may as well be the bus or the line at the bank. I hesitate to even call this socializing since the idea is to interact as little as possible. Try not to look at one another and only acknowledge one another if it's absolutely necessary. I don't see this as desirable for anyone.

There is a very notable difference between going to the movies or taking the buss that connects people, PURPOSE. The reason WHY they go there and what they take away (or hope to take away) when they leave. When I'm sitting on the buss, I know nothing of the people around me or why they are there aside from the fact that they apparently have to get somewhere and that they have chosen the buss as a means of transportation. I do not know where they are going or where they come from and it is quite unlikely that they have the same destination as myself, nor do I know if they chose the buss because they think it is more environmentally sound or if they just don't have a car or a drivers license. It's the same thing with the bank. I don't know if these people I'm standing in line with are there to make a deposit or a withdrawal. If they are making a withdrawal, how much are they taking out? Are they excited that they have finally saved up enough to move the family into that dream house they always wanted? Or are they terrified because they have lost their job and need to know how much time they have before they get kicked out of their home? Or maybe they just heard about some new service app that they wanted some more information on. I know nothing about these people aside from the fact that they apparently have some business being at the bank.

But with movies, every single person in that room with you have come there for the same purpose, to watch a movie. And not just A movie but the same movie you wanted to see. Maybe their reasons for going to see it are different from yours, but fundamentally they all went there because they had SOME interest in the film that was on screen. And at the end of the day, every single one of them walked out with some opinion about what they had seen. That is something that connects people, that brings them together even if they never even speak with eachother. And nothing is stopping you from starting up a conversation either. After all, you just watched the same movie so you have an excellent ice-breaker.

the antithesis:
I find the movie theater app idea to be like the menus on some retro compilations that that are like being in a 70's or 80's bedroom and you have to sift through the cartridges to play them. This sort of thing can fuck right off, get the fuck out of my way and let me play the fucking games. The problem with novelty is that it is paper thin, shallow and substanceless. Hence why novelty tends to wear off pretty fast, before the kickstarted Android console even gets into the hands of backers, much less onto store shelves. So a movie theater app on the Occulus Rift can fuck right off, get the fuck out of my way and let me watch the fucking movie.

I wouldn't imagine anyone would force you to use it. That still doesn't change the notion that virtual reality, even just optical virtual really, may play a significant role in the future of movie going.

As you stated, it may also be a passing fad. Either way, it should be considered.

Lightknight:
That still doesn't change the notion that virtual reality, even just optical virtual really, may play a significant role in the future of movie going.

As you stated, it may also be a passing fad. Either way, it should be considered.

Uh, no it won't. Virtual reality was considered fairly heavily in the 90's, but people lost interest and not because there wasn't a thing to strap to your head but because the idea is inherently flawed for the reasons I've already given. I predict a lot of buyer's remorse in the future.

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Registered for a free account here