Escape to the Movies: The World's End

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Crispee:

Anybody else think the ending was kind of like...

Holy shit yes! That's exactly what I thought.

Trust these guys to take that particular concept and actually make it good.

I will admit, as much as I laughed at the film, the jokes wern't quite as 'quotable' as the previous films mostly due to the jokes being drunken slurs or entire action scenes... speaking of which, the action scenes were f*cking amazing.

Liked the movie, and like the review. Pointed out some things I might have missed that I think I'll look into on a second viewing.

The whole EU thing interested me, but I think some context would be helpful. The whole EU issue (the UK is part of the EU (but not part of the Euro currency) and will hold an in/out referendum soon) is pretty relevant, so it's by no means a long shot to say that it might have some bearing on it, but I think this could stem more from with the homogenisation of England internally. There's been a long-running discussion about the 'death of the high street' over here, prompted by small businesses losing out to large chains. Go to any town in England and you can almost guarantee to find a certain selection of chains there, regardless of location - this goes double for the south-east. I'm fairly certain this is an issue in America too, but in England it's pretty obvious by looking at our pubs; the difference between the few independent pubs and those that belong to a chain is usually quite noticeable, even just by looking at the selection of beers on tap.

Our membership of the EU could be seen as a part of this homogenisation, maybe. But I don't think that the film points specifically to that as much as how much we've managed to homogenise ourselves here without external pressure.

Alar:
So, wait... alien indoctrination comes with hot school girls hitting on you? Interesting...

luvd1:


That stuff really gets on my goat.

Keep in mind how much stuff is run by the Internet and computers these days. The world economy would probably crash into the ground and dig a ten mile trench if you suddenly eliminated it from our lives.

[spoier]The explosion that happened in Newton Haven happened at other places the blanks had taken over as well. It's been a couple of weeks since I've seen this, but I'm pretty sure the network mentioned there being 2000 places they had infiltrated. That's a lot of the world's population that would be killed all at once. That would also cause a bit of a dark age.

Not that we know what life was properly like, as we didn't see much of the world after it 'ended'.[/spoiler]

So, no reaction to "Ben Affleck is Batman"? Not even at the end where you can easily slip a first reaction in?

A little disappointed, though I'm pretty sure it'll be the topic of "The Big Picture" next Tuesday.

Saioon:
Great film, though living in the town it was filmed in made it a slightly creepy experience.

Haha, I went to school there (assuming you mean Welwyn) - one of the warpiest parts of the film was when they went to the Tonic and it was completely different inside :P I'm a massive fan of Pegg and I managed to catch a bit of the filming, was really cool.

I loved this film when I saw it in theaters a few weeks back, why? I honestly couldn't tell you, its a very odd movie and describing why it is good is bloody difficult...

I loved this film, although it came out in Australia ages ago. Frankly, I felt it was the best of the Simon Pegg/Nick Frost/Edgar Wright collaborations. Certainly the best bit of acting Pegg has ever done. The ability of the film to strike a balance between comedy and genuine, devastating emotion was pretty phenomenal.

I'm really glad and relieved that this film is just as good as Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead. I'm a massive fan of those two, and my dad loves them too. We'll have to go see it then!

luvd1:

Piorn:
I haven't read up on the people involved, so why is Paul not counted as one of their movies?

Coz wright wasn't involved. None of that crowd was. It just stared pegg and frost.

Also, Paul is an American film.

This movie is like if Simon Pegg and co were dropped into a Doctor Who episode. Not necessarily the best but definitely the funniest of the three.

Star Trek had like 10 episodes with some alien intelligence offering peace in return for free will, which Kirk ends up adamantly opposing. Not to mention most of Cold War era Sci Fi (body snatchers being a big one), it was largely analogous to the idealism and lack of individualism assosciated with Communism.

OlasDAlmighty:
This movie is like if Simon Pegg and co were dropped into a Doctor Who episode. Not necessarily the best but definitely the funniest of the three.

He's been in one or two, right?

Loved this film when I saw it last week.
The movie isn't perfect by any stretch, but it never lets shaky moments in the story interfere with the film making at it's core, so it's easy to gloss over any faults.
Also DAT ENDING... Mmmph

Whist I accept Bob's review of this as pretty much right. I take a little more um-bridge with his assertion that Hot Fuzz played broader strokes. With Wright shooting in his home 'city' (always use that term loosely with Wells) and Pegg being Gloucestershire man there is something distinctly Westcountry about it. Whilst it may be little more accessible there are entire parts of that movie you certainly won't quite understand where it's coming from unless your from these parts.

Also never saw the EU message in there I doubt anyone in Britain really did and more of anger against the lack of individuality in todays morden society. How everyone must look 'perfect' remembering the replacements are not replacement but the same person conforming. But also how by being more interconnected we are growing further apart and distant from the world.

The ending is the rejection of that society in possibly the greatest drunken argument ever.

As a Brit I have to concur with what others have said about the possible EU message of the film; it isn't in there. It does reference the homogenisation of England though, which is largely seen as part of the ever encroaching American influence over the country, tied in with globalisation and neo-liberal capitalism.

Turning to the film itself, my viewing of it probably suffered for a few particular reasons. I had literally just watched both Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, back to back, in the same screen where I saw The World's End. It was a triple bill showing of all three starting at about 4:30pm. Considering I had been on a massive pub crawl myself the night before, ending with my suddenly becoming aware that I was walking through Brighton, alone, and that it had gotten light at some point, sitting in a dark room for the best part of 6 hours was exactly what I needed.

TWE defintely bears for a second viewing; it's not as funny as SOTD or HF, but it has its moments and it's a good send off to the trilogy.

Geo Da Sponge:

Crispee:

Anybody else think the ending was kind of like...

Ending spoiler talk.

OlasDAlmighty:
This movie is like if Simon Pegg and co were dropped into a Doctor Who episode. Not necessarily the best but definitely the funniest of the three.

That was my thought exactly. It fell like a big budget (drunken) episode of Dr. Who and I loved it.

luvd1:

elvor0:

luvd1:
Well, you liked it better then I when I saw it. I was not convinced with the chemistry of the crowd, the friendship they supposed to of had just did not excist for me and that kept poking me in the ribs like a five year old who's just seen the puppy and firework factory was having a sale.... And the end was total balls. I hate that 1st world techno fear ballshit. Gods i really hate that stupid shit.

ehhh, I think that was the point. Garry was completely estranged from all of them, and the rest of them didn't seem to have kept in contact /that/ much with each other. The chemistry was there, just it was distant, which worked in context that they hadn't really been together as a group and done that sort of thing in years.

Plus I don't think the techno fear was supposed to be a message, Pegg/Wright/Frost are all massive Sci Fi geeks, to the point where if they could afford it, they'd likely be investing in R&D of hoverboards. It seemed more like a "fuck you" to homogeneous bull crap, the idea of watering things down or changing them to fit in with the whole, removing any semblance of uniqueness that they had so they'll fit in. It's a theme that is presented early on in the film with the pubs being all chain bars, as opposed to local pubs, Kings argument with the thing at the end just felt like the culmination of that rather than techno fear. Of course it had some rather shite consequences (no more cornettos!) though.

You missunderstand my post. I'm talking about the acting. It's like when an actor does comedy. There's a difference between being funny and acting funny, it's a sort of uncanny valley. At no point did I believe in their characters being "alive", so could not invest in the back story. They were as unreal as the dups. And I'm not tlking about the message at the end, . I mean the actual ending after kings speech. When... You know


That stuff really gets on my goat.

Oh I got you were on about the acting, I just felt it worked in context, though to be fair we were pinted up ourselves when we watched so I was less scrupulous than normal. Though I still feel Pegg and Frost gave great performances. But if you didn't like it, you didn't like it, so I guess I'll leave it at that :)

In regards to the very ending

I did find it amusing however, that after the film finished, I stood up, demanded to my mates that we go to the pub, only to realise I was wearing almost the exact same outfit as Peggs character in the film.

I've got to agree with some other replies. The film may have been the weakest in the trilogy, but it's still a fantastic film. Anyone who saw the entire trilogy in one sitting likely has a lower opinion on the film than it's worth and owe it a revisit (myself included). The ending was a bit of a curveball, but I find that happened with every film in the trilogy (each film has a huge tone shift towards the end where the action/comedy is broken up by serious exposition). The message at the end was clear from Gary and it works on two levels.

It works on one level because out of all the people who had to defend the human race's right to be individual, he HAD to be the one. He was the most stubborn amongst the gang and had a lifestyle to validate.

On the other level, we view Gary with a sort of sadness. We see him as something different to the mundane office style job worker that at least Frost's character is (and most of the others are, actually). There's a rift between us and Gary. When we see Gary's drunken rant it's supposed to seem hammy and over the top and maybe we're not supposed to be cheering him on 100%. That rift shows there's room for individualism and there's nothing wrong with being a bit more Gary, though society may tell us otherwise.

Great film. My local cinema has already stopped showing it which sucks cause I wanted to go see it again. Not quite Shaun of the Dead or Hot Fuzz but still a fantastic film!

Alluos:
Loved this film when I saw it last week.
The movie isn't perfect by any stretch, but it never lets shaky moments in the story interfere with the film making at it's core, so it's easy to gloss over any faults.
Also DAT ENDING... Mmmph

"Five waters, please"

elvor0:

luvd1:

elvor0:

ehhh, I think that was the point. Garry was completely estranged from all of them, and the rest of them didn't seem to have kept in contact /that/ much with each other. The chemistry was there, just it was distant, which worked in context that they hadn't really been together as a group and done that sort of thing in years.

Plus I don't think the techno fear was supposed to be a message, Pegg/Wright/Frost are all massive Sci Fi geeks, to the point where if they could afford it, they'd likely be investing in R&D of hoverboards. It seemed more like a "fuck you" to homogeneous bull crap, the idea of watering things down or changing them to fit in with the whole, removing any semblance of uniqueness that they had so they'll fit in. It's a theme that is presented early on in the film with the pubs being all chain bars, as opposed to local pubs, Kings argument with the thing at the end just felt like the culmination of that rather than techno fear. Of course it had some rather shite consequences (no more cornettos!) though.

You missunderstand my post. I'm talking about the acting. It's like when an actor does comedy. There's a difference between being funny and acting funny, it's a sort of uncanny valley. At no point did I believe in their characters being "alive", so could not invest in the back story. They were as unreal as the dups. And I'm not tlking about the message at the end, . I mean the actual ending after kings speech. When... You know


That stuff really gets on my goat.

Oh I got you were on about the acting, I just felt it worked in context, though to be fair we were pinted up ourselves when we watched so I was less scrupulous than normal. Though I still feel Pegg and Frost gave great performances. But if you didn't like it, you didn't like it, so I guess I'll leave it at that :)

In regards to the very ending

I did find it amusing however, that after the film finished, I stood up, demanded to my mates that we go to the pub, only to realise I was wearing almost the exact same outfit as Peggs character in the film.

Oh don't get me started on that show... My head hurts just by the pitch of the thing.
I think the thing that was pulling me out of the film was oddly paddy considine and Eddie marsan, which saddens me. Two brillient actors but they just didn't seem as fleshed out as Simons, Nick or Martins. Eddies performance reminded me of the villan he played in will smiths Hancock. A none entity. Their characters just didn't seem that needed.

You know, I must of not been in the right mood for the film. In fact I think I'll see it again. I'm not afraid to challenge my own opinions.

SirBryghtside:

Saioon:
Great film, though living in the town it was filmed in made it a slightly creepy experience.

Haha, I went to school there (assuming you mean Welwyn) - one of the warpiest parts of the film was when they went to the Tonic and it was completely different inside :P I'm a massive fan of Pegg and I managed to catch a bit of the filming, was really cool.

No, the other town it was filmed in, Letchworth, though they do cut between the two. More amusing that they made a film a bout a pub crawl here as until 15 years ago it was a dry town and there are only 3 pubs here. They had to use the cinema for the night club.

Nice, I'll go and see it then. I liked the previous two, I think Hot Fuzz was my favourite, since I live in a place like that small town.

Also, I'm not sure that there's many people angry at us not fully joining the EU.

The Gentleman:
The entirety of all recommendations for this movie: did you like Shawn of the Dead and/or Hot Fuzz? Then you'll like this movie...

I adored those films. I've loved these guys since the days of Spaced.

And I hated this movie.

It wasn't funny, it had no charm or spark, it just felt like an excuse for some wacky robot fighting hi-jinks with a rushed message about aging tacked on.

Rarely have I been so disappointed by a movie as I was by The World's End.

Just one thing the UK is part of the EU and most people agree we overall benefit from it, we just aren't as committed to it as Germany or France.

Always assumed there was a reference to the trend for British Sci-fi movies of the fifties and early sixties to seem to all be set in pubs...

Tribalism:
I've got to agree with some other replies. The film may have been the weakest in the trilogy, but it's still a fantastic film. Anyone who saw the entire trilogy in one sitting likely has a lower opinion on the film than it's worth and owe it a revisit (myself included). The ending was a bit of a curveball, but I find that happened with every film in the trilogy (each film has a huge tone shift towards the end where the action/comedy is broken up by serious exposition). The message at the end was clear from Gary and it works on two levels.

It works on one level because out of all the people who had to defend the human race's right to be individual, he HAD to be the one. He was the most stubborn amongst the gang and had a lifestyle to validate.

On the other level, we view Gary with a sort of sadness. We see him as something different to the mundane office style job worker that at least Frost's character is (and most of the others are, actually). There's a rift between us and Gary. When we see Gary's drunken rant it's supposed to seem hammy and over the top and maybe we're not supposed to be cheering him on 100%. That rift shows there's room for individualism and there's nothing wrong with being a bit more Gary, though society may tell us otherwise.

Gary, oh poor Gary. right off that bat I felt immensely bad for him. and at first I couldn't place it.

Well you sold me... it wasn't hard but you sold me :) i'll see it within the week when i find the time.

Excellent film. I love the way these 'cornetto' films start out so funny and charming and kind of descend into darkness and surrealism towards the end, and this one definitely got darker than either of the others. Even if it was probably a bit lighter on the laughs, still my favourite of the three.

Oh and that last little section at the end was just a great way to finish it.

Purple Dragon:
Just one thing the UK is part of the EU and most people agree we overall benefit from it, we just aren't as committed to it as Germany or France.

Hmmmm, actually the opposite of true I'm afraid.

Yes we are trapped in the EU, but for over a decade every opinion poll has shown a clear majority in favour of leaving the EU and that on balance we DON'T benefit from it. This is a fact, look up the polls for yourself.

In addition alongside Germany we are the only other net contributor to the EU budget, so by very definition we put more in than we get out.

Furthermore in the video bob mentions a rage against conformity. But if your raging against conformity you would rage against the EU, all it does is impose conformity on its subjects regardless of whether they agree or not.

The World's End is a lot more introspective than Hot Fuzz and less heavy handed in places than Shaun of the Dead.
But it's a great film and has far more to say than a lot of films out today; including the current Oscar bait.

NinjaDeathSlap:
I thought the movie was definitely up there with Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz (the latter of which being in my Top 5 favorite movies of all time), right up until the end, where they kind of lost me at...

One can certainly interpret it that way, but I took it as the payoff for a setup WAAAAAYYY earlier in the film.

That's how I took the ending.
Racism/Immigration was, curiously, the last thing on my mind at that point.

I pretty much like all of Pegg's movies. Definitely going to watch this then :)
Also - Pegg as Ant Man would indeed rock!

Piorn:
I haven't read up on the people involved, so why is Paul not counted as one of their movies?

Shaun, Hot Fuzz and The World's End are written by Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright and directed by the latter. Paul had a different director and written by Pegg and Frost.

SonicWaffle:

The Gentleman:
The entirety of all recommendations for this movie: did you like Shawn of the Dead and/or Hot Fuzz? Then you'll like this movie...

I adored those films. I've loved these guys since the days of Spaced.

And I hated this movie.

It wasn't funny, it had no charm or spark, it just felt like an excuse for some wacky robot fighting hi-jinks with a rushed message about aging tacked on.

Rarely have I been so disappointed by a movie as I was by The World's End.

Having now watched it myself, I didn't quite take such a negative turn with it, but I definitely understand the sentiment. The opening (which is quite long) pretty much starts in a very bleak place and let's you know that something is seriously wrong with King, although exactly what that is actually takes the majority of the movie to get to. Additionally, the ending, which I am not going to spoil here, comes so way out of left field that you kind of wondering how the hell we got there (although it does serve a purpose, make no mistake). Indeed, I gauged audience reaction at times throughout the movie and noticed about a 50/50 split between horrified revulsion and semi-reluctant laughter.

While I would put it as the weakest of the three (Hot Fuzz was my favorite by far), I still enjoyed it, partially out of a twisted "how are they going to fuck up next?" at about the halfway point.

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