Space Invaders

Space Invaders

The world is scary, your house is your castle, stay there as much as possible, buy more stuff to occupy your time there. The incursion into The Home by evil has become the great modern anxiety of the age, and has remained ever since.

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I have no desire to actually sit through YOU'RE NEXT so I wish you had gone ahead and spoiled it.

These movies sound fascinating (if not for the unnecessary gore that is).

I was kind of hoping for a more thorough examination of the 50s fascination with the home and the development of the home invasion subgenre, particularly how it has evolved over the years and what it means for us today. However, I suppose another list of obscure movies I'll probably never see will suffice for now. I'm sure someone will go out and watch them all, but I've got better things, er, different things to do with my time.

MovieBob:
Stories about the need to protect one's home have likely existed as long as human beings have had homes

The medieval Scots ballad "Get Up and Bar the Door" dates back to, at least, the late 1700's. So, yeah.

OT: I remember seeing a play put on by my university acting troupe about a home invasion where two robbers enter an apartment in the 1950s while the husband is out and the blind wife is left in the home. They think that they have tricked her into believing they are her husband's friends, but she catches on quickly and makes a plan to take them out. It started off lighthearted by took a real dark turn in the third act and still is the only time I've jumped in my seat at a stage play.

So, basically, this family is being attacked by the cast of Hotline Miami 2?

I see from the first page Bob's letting his liberal guilt out. What's funny is I read the Bold print in the voice of some pleasant-sounding narration from an old commercial, and the italic print in a electronically-altered voiceover from some hacker interrupting the signal of the aforementioned commercial. Finally, some good uses for the voices in my head. I wish the voices I hear in my knees were as helpful.

OT: Wasn't The Purge a home invasion movie? I just rewatched bob's review of that, and he HATED it.

Michael Haineke would like to have a little word with you Bob. Heh, that would be awesome wouldn't it? Funny Games (both of them) is the Unforgiven of home invasion movies.

This explains why so many people fear home invasions and keep loaded guns under their beds and what not. I had no idea this was a genre (or sub-genre, or whatever.)

Sometimes a cigar's just a cigar, Bob. Or, to put it another way, Occam's Razor tells us that it's far more likely that the post war generation got married and had a bunch of kids because they'd just been through a depression and a pretty miserable war and wanted to enjoy themselves, than some capitalist marketing cabal manipulated an entire generation into creating the suburbs. That's less historical revisionism, and more paranoid delusion.

So what about Home Alone?

I'd love to see a grim reboot depicting the harsh struggle of the Wet Bandit gang trying to pay off a loan to a mob boss by robbing a seemingly hapless family they know is on a vacation in Dubai... only to fall prey to the Sadistic Kevin's traps, who was not so accidentally left at home. Complete with a dower showdown between the Wet Bandit gang and the disenfranchised Old Man Marley, who also struggles with a drug addiction.

Bah. Maybe I should just read more Cracked articles.

Good to see some love for People Under The Stairs. Still one of my favourite horror/thriller movies of all time, and in my opinion one of Cravens best films. Maybe not most enjoyable, but probably best made in my opinion.

That being said, i'm on a tangent now, and i remember seeing Red Eye in the cinema a few moons ago (not a home invasion film, a Craven film) and the sheer tension that was created by the atmosphere was amazing, and showed Wes still had some vision and talent in there somewhere.

Towels:
So what about Home Alone?

I'd love to see a grim reboot depicting the harsh struggle of the Wet Bandit gang trying to pay off a loan to a mob boss by robbing a seemingly hapless family they know is on a vacation in Dubai... only to fall prey to the Sadistic Kevin's traps, who was not so accidentally left at home. Complete with a dower showdown between the Wet Bandit gang and the disenfranchised Old Man Marley, who also struggles with a drug addiction.

Bah. Maybe I should just read more Cracked articles.

That i would like to see actually lol. Could be a quite interesting film,, perhaps something Eli Roth should take a stab at... or maybe Whedon.

Hey Bob, maybe some people like socializing and having neighbors, but DON'T like being piled up in a city. Obviously politics affects everything in the world, but I think the main thing that makes suburbia popular is that people genuinely like living in it.

Personally, me and MY family are rural and detests the idea of having another house within sight of our driveway. But I sstill understand other peoples' lifestyle tastes.

UltraHammer:
Hey Bob, maybe some people like socializing and having neighbors, but DON'T like being piled up in a city. Obviously politics affects everything in the world, but I think the main thing that makes suburbia popular is that people genuinely like living in it.

Personally, me and MY family are rural and detests the idea of having another house within sight of our driveway. But I still understand other peoples' lifestyle tastes.

That's the IDEA of suburbia. The reality is often fraught with petty cruelties and monotony. American suburbia especially seems uniquely well fitted to these problems and pressures since most of them are grind planned, modern built mega developments. Suburban people don't often know their neighbors terribly well, but just well enough to judge them. In many areas there can also be pretty baffling housing codes (the old stereotype of people being shunned for their front yard having the wrong kind of sprinkler somewhat still holds true). The overriding words i would use to describe US suburban life are "Conformity" and "boredom".

As a young person especially the suburbs can feel like a flat, constructed prison. A kind of nowhere place that were built very rigidly with a very specific lifestyle in mind, especially when it comes commercial areas. Suburbs have no character. They are made to be functionally boring, they are very isolating places to be sometimes. They are bad for the soul.

Scrumpmonkey:

UltraHammer:
Hey Bob, maybe some people like socializing and having neighbors, but DON'T like being piled up in a city. Obviously politics affects everything in the world, but I think the main thing that makes suburbia popular is that people genuinely like living in it.

Personally, me and MY family are rural and detests the idea of having another house within sight of our driveway. But I still understand other peoples' lifestyle tastes.

That's the IDEA of suburbia. The reality is often fraught with petty cruelties and monotony. American suburbia especially seems uniquely well fitted to these problems and pressures since most of them are grind planned, modern built mega developments. Suburban people don't often know their neighbors terribly well, but just well enough to judge them. In many areas there can also be pretty baffling housing codes (the old stereotype of people being shunned for their front yard having the wrong kind of sprinkler somewhat still holds true). The overriding words i would use to describe US suburban life are "Conformity" and "boredom".

As a young person especially the suburbs can feel like a flat, constructed prison. A kind of nowhere place that were built very rigidly with a very specific lifestyle in mind, especially when it comes commercial areas. Suburbs have no character. They are made to be functionally boring, they are very isolating places to be sometimes. They are bad for the soul.

And honestly, these days suburbs are becoming almost just as crowded AS the big cities.

It's like this malformed hybrid of the rural and urban, except with even less to do...

WWmelb:
Good to see some love for People Under The Stairs. Still one of my favourite horror/thriller movies of all time, and in my opinion one of Cravens best films. Maybe not most enjoyable, but probably best made in my opinion.

That being said, i'm on a tangent now, and i remember seeing Red Eye in the cinema a few moons ago (not a home invasion film, a Craven film) and the sheer tension that was created by the atmosphere was amazing, and showed Wes still had some vision and talent in there somewhere.

Towels:
So what about Home Alone?

I'd love to see a grim reboot depicting the harsh struggle of the Wet Bandit gang trying to pay off a loan to a mob boss by robbing a seemingly hapless family they know is on a vacation in Dubai... only to fall prey to the Sadistic Kevin's traps, who was not so accidentally left at home. Complete with a dower showdown between the Wet Bandit gang and the disenfranchised Old Man Marley, who also struggles with a drug addiction.

Bah. Maybe I should just read more Cracked articles.

That i would like to see actually lol. Could be a quite interesting film,, perhaps something Eli Roth should take a stab at... or maybe Whedon.

The first person that came to mind was James Gunn, who directed Super. He would provide the absurdly over the top violence that this kind of reboot requires.

spwatkins:

WWmelb:
Good to see some love for People Under The Stairs. Still one of my favourite horror/thriller movies of all time, and in my opinion one of Cravens best films. Maybe not most enjoyable, but probably best made in my opinion.

That being said, i'm on a tangent now, and i remember seeing Red Eye in the cinema a few moons ago (not a home invasion film, a Craven film) and the sheer tension that was created by the atmosphere was amazing, and showed Wes still had some vision and talent in there somewhere.

Towels:
So what about Home Alone?

I'd love to see a grim reboot depicting the harsh struggle of the Wet Bandit gang trying to pay off a loan to a mob boss by robbing a seemingly hapless family they know is on a vacation in Dubai... only to fall prey to the Sadistic Kevin's traps, who was not so accidentally left at home. Complete with a dower showdown between the Wet Bandit gang and the disenfranchised Old Man Marley, who also struggles with a drug addiction.

Bah. Maybe I should just read more Cracked articles.

That i would like to see actually lol. Could be a quite interesting film,, perhaps something Eli Roth should take a stab at... or maybe Whedon.

The first person that came to mind was James Gunn, who directed Super. He would provide the absurdly over the top violence that this kind of reboot requires.

Yeah James Gunn would be a good choice for this kind of project. Would certainly have the dark realism for some extra disturbingness.

No love for Key Largo? Granted, it's a hotel instead of a house, but it's more like a bed and breakfast (with the owners living there and everything).

Huh, you'd actually recommend You're Next? I'm just amazed that anyone could make a film like that unironically after Cabin in the Woods. Unless the trailer is incredibly misleading, it looks like one of the most generic slasher films ever made.

Great article, definitely gonna have to check out Hostage and People Under The Stairs.

It makes me sad that for all the noise hollywood producers make about films starring or themed around black people basically being complete non-starters in a business sense, stuff like this proves them completely right.

Scrumpmonkey:

UltraHammer:
Hey Bob, maybe some people like socializing and having neighbors, but DON'T like being piled up in a city. Obviously politics affects everything in the world, but I think the main thing that makes suburbia popular is that people genuinely like living in it.

Personally, me and MY family are rural and detests the idea of having another house within sight of our driveway. But I still understand other peoples' lifestyle tastes.

That's the IDEA of suburbia. The reality is often fraught with petty cruelties and monotony. American suburbia especially seems uniquely well fitted to these problems and pressures since most of them are grind planned, modern built mega developments. Suburban people don't often know their neighbors terribly well, but just well enough to judge them. In many areas there can also be pretty baffling housing codes (the old stereotype of people being shunned for their front yard having the wrong kind of sprinkler somewhat still holds true). The overriding words i would use to describe US suburban life are "Conformity" and "boredom".

As a young person especially the suburbs can feel like a flat, constructed prison. A kind of nowhere place that were built very rigidly with a very specific lifestyle in mind, especially when it comes commercial areas. Suburbs have no character. They are made to be functionally boring, they are very isolating places to be sometimes. They are bad for the soul.

They're bad for everything, really. They have to have lawns. In the United States, we're talking about more than 50% of residential water and seventy million pounds of pesticide used every year just to ensure that thirty million acres of American soil is made up of ecologically non-contributing useless-ass grass. That's possibly more land than we use for farming, and probably more pesticide per acre as well. I have no idea how much money we spend on this and I shudder to imagine what it must be like in Australia, where they'd have to waste even more water. And all this just to express conformity to an ideal from the fucking fifties.

Fleaman:

They're bad for everything, really. They have to have lawns. In the United States, we're talking about more than 50% of residential water and seventy million pounds of pesticide used every year just to ensure that thirty million acres of American soil is made up of ecologically non-contributing useless-ass grass. That's possibly more land than we use for farming, and probably more pesticide per acre as well. I have no idea how much money we spend on this and I shudder to imagine what it must be like in Australia, where they'd have to waste even more water. And all this just to express conformity to an ideal from the fucking fifties.

Arizona and especially Las Vegas are a good expression of this, sprinkler systems in the USA baffle me. If grass won't grow naturally why force it to grow? The gardens on life support I've seen in the USA don't make much sense to me. Incidentally lawns are a very British idea, mainly because it's hard to keep grass from growing anywhere over here in this rainy ass country.

I suppose that's what unsettles me most about American suburbia. It's all artificial, a construct. It's an anglicised fantasy of living; little islands of vaguely European green in the scrub or the desert. Outside of large planned estates housing has generally evolved naturally around towns in the UK, i live in a village and sure a lot of it is suburban housing but it it's patchwork of different buildings from different times. It feels like a village, like a place that has grown.

 

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