The Big Picture: Memorium

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Memorium

MovieBob gives us an honest and interesting look in on Hiroshi Yamauchi's influence on gaming and popular culture.

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Very nice and in-depth tribute, Mr. Chipman.

RIP Hiroshi Ymauchi, you truly changed the world forever and you will be missed.

I wonder what Bob thinks about the upcoming Saving Mr. Banks, a biopic on Walt Disney during the creation of Mary Poppins.

The Gentleman:
I wonder what Bob thinks about the upcoming Saving Mr. Banks, a biopic on Walt Disney during the creation of Mary Poppins.

Wonder no more: http://moviebob.blogspot.com/2013/07/bank-on-it.html

I remember going to a forum, talking about this guy and how he made the industry what it is today, when someone confusingly said "Didn't Shigeru Miyamoto shape the industry to what it is today? What did this guy do?" And I had to explain that it was THIS guy who basically gave Miyamoto, who was a complete unknown at the time, the chance to make the game that would become Donkey Kong, as well as set Nintendo on the track to becoming one of the most dominant gaming forces for years to come.

So yeah, rest in peace, Yamauchi-sama.

I was too young to ever really know of Ymauchi when he was calling the shots of Nintendo. So I never understood how big a role he played in the medium of games. That said, with his passing, one has to think of how things will spin when the faces behind the games start passing like Miyamoto, Newell, Cliffy B, Suda51, or any other names and personalities that (for better or worse) do bring a lot to the medium with what they make.

Morbid to think about, but when those days do inevitably come, I'm interested to see the general reaction and how their losses will impact the medium.

Im curious, has MovieBob ever said anything regarding Jobs passing? Could be interesting considering his long speech about not making devils and stuff, cause i know a lot of people tend to either categorize Jobs as a devil or a god, which seems a bit ridiculous.

But nice to see someone pay homage to this guy, its hard to deny his influence on the industry.

Beautiful words... But also very strong.

Good job putting things into perspective, Bob.

When the original obit post for Yamauchi came up all I could really think of was why the hell is this news. At the very least I'm ready to concede the fact that it was, now.

Very interesting that a guy that so hated video games (or portrayed that way) would go so far to push video games, and end up making some of the best gaming devices and games this video gaming era has seen.

Just goes to show EA and activision heads that yes you can hate video games and gamers but make quality stuff. Push quality and innovation and not abuse your fans with garbage.

Well done; this gave me insight into someone I knew very little about.

Firstly, I want to thank you for sticking with one accent through nearly the whole video. It is much much better than randomly jumping back and forth.

On the topic though. I doubt that gaming wouldn't be here today if it weren't for nintendo, it would have taken a little longer, but gaming would have existed and been just fine.

And as a person who doesnt particularly care for Nintendo I must say nice words, but on the man? meh.

Nice send of Chip... But it's kinda ruined by the shameless plug :P

I myself never heard of the guy unfortunately, but I suppose he was quite important to say the least.

I blame capitalism for people trying to make gods out of normal flawed people.

Didn't see this one coming. A business man who's only goal is to make money? you don't say. Next week, Bob will discuss a book called Atlas Shrugged. That is all.

Anyway, it's sad to see another icon of the modern era gone. But I do think that Nintendo didn't do much better without him. The GameCube was his last 'farewell' and the Wii although being placed in every single home everywhere slowly was killed by a lack of good games. Same goes for the Wii U. But there is something they can still save if they want to.

RIP, Hiroshi Yamauchi...

Well I don't always (in fact rarely :P) agree with you Bob - particularly your Big Picture series - this one was very tastefully done and I feel it was something that needed to be said. Indeed, many of us - particularly in the "old school crowd that grew up with the NES and earlier systems - wouldn't be where we are if not for this guy. The influence and impact he had on the gaming world is undeniable, and we as gamers owe him a lot.

Bob:
"Would any of this be here?"

Yes.

Remember that column Shamus wrote about the great video game crash? You should read the comments about it here and on his blog, the crash was well contained within the USA.

damn, been a while since I've seen such a good episode of the big picture... holy crap it really has been a while...

Didn't really no much about the man but a moving tribute that didn't get caught up in assuming that once you die you're either a hero or a villain. Nice work Bob. Especially the Japanese.

cerebus23:

Just goes to show EA and activision heads that yes you can hate video games and gamers but make quality stuff. Push quality and innovation and not abuse your fans with garbage.

Let's not go using the thread to rustle some jimmies eh?

A truly touching send-off to one of gaming's greatest visionaries, Bob. Well done. =)

Could someone familiar with the Japanese language please translate Bob's final words for me? Thank you!

"Sama" is such a strong word... "Dono" would have been better at that point... it's respectful, yet you don't sound like you are worshiping the guy... in the wrong way...

Can anyone tell me what the name of the cartoon at 4:51 is. I for the life of me can't remember it but it's so bloody familliar

So, he was the Kotick and Riccitiello of 80's Japanese business. Not a good thing, but he seemed to be actually um... good at what he did. I've heard quite the amount of stories about this man, and they all are interesting. Like how people would pitch him ideas, he'd approve them early on, they'd come to like 98% completion and he'd scrap the whole thing because of one or two things he didn't like. The man seemed to just have an intuition of what would work.

Years from now when the medium matures even more, he'll be remembered as one of the big faces in gaming along with the likes of several writers, company owners, and designers. I'd imagine many Japanese developers I like were influenced by things he's done. Inafune, Miyazaki, and Tanimura all probably owe him something.

As for the whole "gaming not existing without him." Well, gaming as we know it today wouldn't exist. But I think it's just a tad bit myopic to assume it wouldn't exist at all, if that is what people are thinking. Designers and programmers have been influenced by an array of different things including things outside of gaming. It would be around, just in a different skin. Would it be worse? Maybe... just maybe.

A small caveat: Tabletop RPGs might only be 40 years old, but they were born from wargaming, which arguably turns 100 years old this year.

Hargrimm:

Bob:
"Would any of this be here?"

Yes.

Remember that column Shamus wrote about the great video game crash? You should read the comments about it here and on his blog, the crash was well contained within the USA.

Also, it only really affected home console gaming. Arcades and home computer games were still quite strong.

"Except for Thommas Edison; that guy was just evil."
Truer words have not been spoken.

I'll say good job on this video. Quite an excellent presentation.

I totally agree, we tend to glorify innovators but only if they're willing to put themselves out where all the cameras can see them. Miyamoto was an innovator in many ways, but someone still needed to trust him enough to bankroll all the things that started what we love and those people shouldn't be forgotten or written off as just some money-grubbing suit. Not much would get done without someone grubbing the money, after all.

In any case, I've now heard Japanese spoken with Bostonian inflections, so it's been a good day. I'm also glad Bob is on the "screw Edison" bandwagon, that's a wagon that needs more mainstream people to hop on it.

What is the game shown at 05:19 ?

That was a very good video and one of the best I have seen for a decent amount of time. Men are not gods nor are they devils, they are just men. I would think that people seeing the challenges and problems of societies' great men would humanize them and make them not so different from the average man. Either way, I doubt the video game industry would have become more than just Nolan Bushnell's fad without Nintendo. I doubt Sega would have pursued video games very far without Nintendo's competition, and even less people would care about the Neo Geo.

punipunipyo:
"Sama" is such a strong word... "Dono" would have been better at that point... it's respectful, yet you don't sound like you are worshiping the guy... in the wrong way...

-dono isn't largely used anymore

Much better than my response to this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-S0gTla1ss

wolf_isthebest:
What is the game shown at 05:19 ?

Its Actraiser. One of IMo the finest games ever released on the SNES and a true classic.

MrBaskerville:
Im curious, has MovieBob ever said anything regarding Jobs passing? Could be interesting considering his long speech about not making devils and stuff, cause i know a lot of people tend to either categorize Jobs as a devil or a god, which seems a bit ridiculous.

But nice to see someone pay homage to this guy, its hard to deny his influence on the industry.

well he did this,

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/columns/moviebob/10530-Based-On-A-True-Story

which touches on it. At least as portrayed in the movie.

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