The Big Picture: Schlocktober 2013: Bio Zombie

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canadamus_prime:
Since I'm sick to death (no pun intended) of zombies I have no real need to add another one to the collection.

Me too.

Say are there any recently debuted supernatural serial killers, i.e. like Jason or Freddy?

How about squad of skeleton soldiers fighting zombies, werewolves, and vampires?

Pogilrup:

canadamus_prime:
Since I'm sick to death (no pun intended) of zombies I have no real need to add another one to the collection.

Me too.

Say are there any recently debuted supernatural serial killers, i.e. like Jason or Freddy?

How about squad of skeleton soldiers fighting zombies, werewolves, and vampires?

Or how about we get something completely different like giant man eating... trees.

I am so very happy Bob did "BioZombie". This movie needs exposure and, as many people as I've made watch it since 2005 or so, it never seems to be as well known as I'd imagine it could be.

Mr.Amakir:

unacomn:
So, basically, it was Dead Rising The Movie.

Dawn of the Dead was basically dead rising the movie.

Except that Dawn of the Dead is from 1978.

(and that was a great year to be alive in)

canadamus_prime:

Pogilrup:

canadamus_prime:
Since I'm sick to death (no pun intended) of zombies I have no real need to add another one to the collection.

Me too.

Say are there any recently debuted supernatural serial killers, i.e. like Jason or Freddy?

How about squad of skeleton soldiers fighting zombies, werewolves, and vampires?

Or how about we get something completely different like giant man eating... trees.

Well they did do "Day Of The Triffids" actually.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_Triffids_(film)

To be honest the entire thing is kind of popular, it's from a book written in the 1950s which saw a sequel in the 2000s called "Night Of The Triffids". It's also spawned two TV series, and a few radio plays.

The basic concept is that a meteor flies over earth and blinds anyone with the misfortune to be outside with their eyes exposed to it. Then giant man-eating plants start making snacks out of everyone. The origin of the plants varies, either being delivered by the comet itself, or a bio-weapon that escapes due to the crisis unleashed by the passing meteor.

It's classic enough where it's referenced in "The Rocky Horror Picture Show". :)

To be honest, as I've said before though I think the problem is less that any particular monster, including Zombies, is overdone, than the simple fact that people keep doing the same things with them over and over again. The bottom line is that movie makers are generally afraid to offend anyone so they choose to stay within safe territory and pretty much just produce minor variations on things that other people have already done and they know won't get too much in the way of actual backlash. In general horror is something that makes people uncomfortable, and not everyone can deal with, or enjoy, being made uncomfortable, even retroactively. This ultimately winds up putting real horror fans at odds with most other people (including, and perhaps especially, horror poseurs).

The last real revolution with horror was actually the so called "torture porn" genere which succeeded in taking people out of their comfort zone. It delighted horror fans, upset horror poseurs (who tried to talk around what it did by claiming it was gross and not scary), and got a lot of criticism from people who were uncomfortable with the entire thing which was the entire point. "Saw" the franchise which launched it went on to see like seven movies (I think it was) but like most things it was the imitators who never really "got it" and just started churning stuff out based on a formula, not wanting to mess with it, or push things to the point of potentially negative attention that might eclipse the big names, and well... the whole thing crashed.

The thing is that Zombie movies almost always wind up retreading the same ground which has already been done perfectly, so all you see are inferior copies of something that was once good. There are a lot of things that can still be done with "Zombies" as a concept and some good movies out there, but the problem is that so few creators want to get past the idea of having a story that is fundamentally about reprehensible people bringing doom upon themselves. You also see people wanting to expand the scope without doing the work needed to make it click. Something like "Walking Dead" will never be more than "okay" for example because it pretty much does the expected with the trappings but doesn't build enough of a world for them to make sense. For example even early on one has to wonder how exactly the military was overrun, the zombies as portrayed in that series couldn't have done it. How do Zombies exactly go about taking out a properly supported tank? (an abandoned/overrun tank being a key prop/scene point early on). Zombie concepts which have been better done are careful to avoid things like this, or to explain them as part of the concept in fairly believable (allowing for it being horror) fashion. A lot of horror creators learned early on that it's much easier to work conceptually with a smaller scale environment, having say an outbreak in a town, or monsters attacking an isolated cabin, rather than say over running the world. Especially seeing as the more over the top you get in terms of what the outbreak is doing globally, the harder it is to justify relatively normal people surviving (or turning things into an action fiasco by deciding Darwinism has already occurred and the only survivors are by definition abnormal buttkickers).

Oh and while I'm rambling, M. Night Shyamalan also did a killer tree movie called "The Happening" which met with much mockery. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Happening_(2008_film) :)

What about Braindead? (Dead Alive in the USA)

It is directed by Peter Jackson, set in New Zealand and came out in 1992...6 years before this crappy looking movie. It was also a Zombie Comedy with so much over the top gore that it kind of makes me sick. Why does this film get mentioned over the vastly superior looking Braindead?

Pogilrup:

canadamus_prime:
Since I'm sick to death (no pun intended) of zombies I have no real need to add another one to the collection.

Me too.

Say are there any recently debuted supernatural serial killers, i.e. like Jason or Freddy?

How about squad of skeleton soldiers fighting zombies, werewolves, and vampires?

Sadly no, to be honest I think there is a lack of guts in trying to do things like this nowadays given the amount of criticisms and infamy those particular series of movies got over the years, not to mention that it involves a gamble and a good eye for talent. With "Nightmare On Elm Street" in particular if you take a look at the people those movies had in them, Heather Langenkamp, a young Johnny Depp, John Saxon (veteran B movie guy), Laurence Fishbourne, and numerous others all through the series and you can see why it succeeded. Not to mention that the relatively low budget of some of these movies disguises how good some of the FX guys were which meant they got a lot more bang for their buck, again with "Nightmare" I've seen a decent amount of behind the scenes stuff for some of the makeup and FX, and it was pretty good for it's day, especially for the kind of series it was, the people put a lot of time and effort into it.

To be fair what you'd need is someone like a young Joss Whedon who doesn't give a crap what anyone thinks and who yet manages to talk his way into a couple of decent opportunities. I mention Joss not simply because of his abilities as a creator, but perhaps most importantly because he has a good eye for talent. You'll notice that a lot of the people he picked up as unknowns or relative unknowns for series like "Buffy" went on to have huge careers in TV and movies, many of which carried regular roles in ongoing series of years afterwards. Anthony Steward Head (Merlin), Nathan Fillion (Castle), Alysson Hannigan (How I Met Your Mother), and others have worked in one place or another almost constantly, even the relative failures like Summer Glau and Elizha Dushku have gotten stuff out there (Terminator, Tru Calling, etc...) which is to say nothing of the number of series his alumni were probably involved in that they were paid for but were never picked up (and thus we never heard of them).

Joss himself is too big nowadays "Cabin In The Woods" aside, he's too heavily involved in major blockbusters right now to really turn his attention to trying to turn out the next big horror franchise. However in the end it's going to be someone like him who will do it, it's going to be all about not only the ideas, but being able to find and pick the right people. I think Wes Craven had a lot of this same talent, albeit he wasn't as good at retaining his people from project to project.

What I really want to know is what the Sex Drive stat is measured in. Millihefners, I'm thinking.

Therumancer:

canadamus_prime:

Pogilrup:

Me too.

Say are there any recently debuted supernatural serial killers, i.e. like Jason or Freddy?

How about squad of skeleton soldiers fighting zombies, werewolves, and vampires?

Or how about we get something completely different like giant man eating... trees.

Well they did do "Day Of The Triffids" actually.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_Triffids_(film)

To be honest the entire thing is kind of popular, it's from a book written in the 1950s which saw a sequel in the 2000s called "Night Of The Triffids". It's also spawned two TV series, and a few radio plays.

The basic concept is that a meteor flies over earth and blinds anyone with the misfortune to be outside with their eyes exposed to it. Then giant man-eating plants start making snacks out of everyone. The origin of the plants varies, either being delivered by the comet itself, or a bio-weapon that escapes due to the crisis unleashed by the passing meteor.

It's classic enough where it's referenced in "The Rocky Horror Picture Show". :)

To be honest, as I've said before though I think the problem is less that any particular monster, including Zombies, is overdone, than the simple fact that people keep doing the same things with them over and over again. The bottom line is that movie makers are generally afraid to offend anyone so they choose to stay within safe territory and pretty much just produce minor variations on things that other people have already done and they know won't get too much in the way of actual backlash. In general horror is something that makes people uncomfortable, and not everyone can deal with, or enjoy, being made uncomfortable, even retroactively. This ultimately winds up putting real horror fans at odds with most other people (including, and perhaps especially, horror poseurs).

The last real revolution with horror was actually the so called "torture porn" genere which succeeded in taking people out of their comfort zone. It delighted horror fans, upset horror poseurs (who tried to talk around what it did by claiming it was gross and not scary), and got a lot of criticism from people who were uncomfortable with the entire thing which was the entire point. "Saw" the franchise which launched it went on to see like seven movies (I think it was) but like most things it was the imitators who never really "got it" and just started churning stuff out based on a formula, not wanting to mess with it, or push things to the point of potentially negative attention that might eclipse the big names, and well... the whole thing crashed.

The thing is that Zombie movies almost always wind up retreading the same ground which has already been done perfectly, so all you see are inferior copies of something that was once good. There are a lot of things that can still be done with "Zombies" as a concept and some good movies out there, but the problem is that so few creators want to get past the idea of having a story that is fundamentally about reprehensible people bringing doom upon themselves. You also see people wanting to expand the scope without doing the work needed to make it click. Something like "Walking Dead" will never be more than "okay" for example because it pretty much does the expected with the trappings but doesn't build enough of a world for them to make sense. For example even early on one has to wonder how exactly the military was overrun, the zombies as portrayed in that series couldn't have done it. How do Zombies exactly go about taking out a properly supported tank? (an abandoned/overrun tank being a key prop/scene point early on). Zombie concepts which have been better done are careful to avoid things like this, or to explain them as part of the concept in fairly believable (allowing for it being horror) fashion. A lot of horror creators learned early on that it's much easier to work conceptually with a smaller scale environment, having say an outbreak in a town, or monsters attacking an isolated cabin, rather than say over running the world. Especially seeing as the more over the top you get in terms of what the outbreak is doing globally, the harder it is to justify relatively normal people surviving (or turning things into an action fiasco by deciding Darwinism has already occurred and the only survivors are by definition abnormal buttkickers).

Oh and while I'm rambling, M. Night Shyamalan also did a killer tree movie called "The Happening" which met with much mockery. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Happening_(2008_film) :)

Wow, I was going for a completely ridiculous suggestion. And yes, I've seen The Happening," but the trees in The Happening didn't eat people.
Although I think the whole sticking with formula thing is done more for the sake of sticking with what's guaranteed to make money than it is a fear of backlash.

No "buy my book!" whats happened Bob????

Call me a kill joy but i've had enough zombies.

still that looks fun, the bio zombie movie. thanks for the peak. Your review was fun and I can agree with your luke warm response to walking dead.

pearcinator:
What about Braindead? (Dead Alive in the USA)

It is directed by Peter Jackson, set in New Zealand and came out in 1992...6 years before this crappy looking movie. It was also a Zombie Comedy with so much over the top gore that it kind of makes me sick. Why does this film get mentioned over the vastly superior looking Braindead?

Probably because everyone already knows about Braindead and Schlocktober seems to be more about giving attention to lesser-known stuff.

themilo504:
Is there a movie industry in china?

Maybes I'm missing sarcasm; but if you've heard of the likes of Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Chow Yun Fat, Jet Li, or John Woo (the first five to spring[1] to mind) then yes. China has a film industry.

[1] HAHA, geddit? Like they were in Kung Fu films with wire-work

My list of obscure zombie movies:
1. Dead Snow
image

Nazi Zombies, cabin in the woods, scary, funny, gloriously self aware yet still brilliant

2. Special Dead
image

Zombies at a camp for mentally challenged people, no budget but totally watchable and hilarious

3. Boy Eats Girl
image

Voodoo zombies in Ireland, the original zombie retains his self awareness, lots of cleverness and one awesome over the top gorefest scene

4. Dance Of The Dead

image

Don't remember much other than liking it

5. Black Sheep

image

Technically a killer critter movie but the sheep are infectious so I'll add it to the zombie movie list, really well made with the "patient zero" sheep being super creepy

Happy Halloween!

unacomn:
So, basically, it was Dead Rising The Movie.

That's what came to mind when they pulled the "drain blood with sprinkler through the head" gag.

Shaun > Fiddo

Just saying.

I remember when I owned a copy of this movie on vhs and dvd. Another classic asian zombie comedy to check out if anyone is interested is Stacy: Attack of the Schoolgirl Zombies.

Oh boy, getting to know characters before they die?
I wish media did that more often.
It's far too common to kill a character that has just been introduced by name one scene before.

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