Unskippable: The Last of Us, Part 3

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The Last of Us, Part 3

Graham and Paul take us further down the rabbit hole that is The Last of Us.

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Didn't think you'd pull it off, but the image of Crash Bandicoot in that scene sealed the deal for me - great work :D Now I need to go and find a way to stop feeling like a prick for giggling while a little girl bled to death...

Nope. Valiant effort, but I'm afraid a dying child is too much to overcome for me to even crack a smile.

Anyone else notice how well the whiskey stayed in the glass as she waved her arms around? That's some viscous stuff..

Sorry, but its hard to focus on comedy with Joel's daughter dying over there, the scene is just too damn powerful. And considering this is the only game that managed to make me cry in the very first fifteen minutes, no joke would have worked, at least with me.

Still, very nice job guys, keep it up.

It always has to be about you Joel doesn't it. Some ones dying and you say "don't do this to me".

The kid's death seemed more like character development for the main guy, she wasn't really alive long enough to make any sort of emotional connection. Reminds me of Nameless Kid during the opening of Mass Effect 3.

008Zulu:
The kid's death seemed more like character development for the main guy, she wasn't really alive long enough to make any sort of emotional connection. Reminds me of Nameless Kid during the opening of Mass Effect 3.

It is character development for Joel. He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game. It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout.

varmintx:
It is character development for Joel. He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game. It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout.

Protecting another human being shouldn't be done out of guilt laden obligation.

Possibly the least funny Unskippable.

Graham_LRR:
Graham and Paul take us further down the rabbit hole that is The Last of Us.

Why aren't Unskippable and Loading Ready Run episodes showing up on the Escapist front page's "latest" banner recently? Do the new Escapist overlords have something against the Loading Reading Run team or something?

(mumbles dubstep bassline while waiting for the drop)

008Zulu:

varmintx:
It is character development for Joel. He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game. It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout.

Protecting another human being shouldn't be done out of guilt laden obligation.

I have no idea how that is the conclusion you came to from what I said, but that's not what is going on.

A death scene in Crash Bandicoot would be super awkward..

Crash would just be smiling down at a dying coco in his arms, then grieve with a little dance and a game of jojo. Oo

008Zulu:

varmintx:
It is character development for Joel. He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game. It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout.

Protecting another human being shouldn't be done out of guilt laden obligation.

What should it be done out of?

Sorry guys, but not even you can make a little girl dying funny.

Well I kinda feel like a jerk for laughing. Because nothing makes an awkward situation better than giggling.

The second time I played The Last of Us, that part made me cry a little.

xD But dammit! As soon as Graham said "From the studio that brought to you, Crash Bandicoot!", I couldn't help but laugh.

The rest(at least in THAT part) was a little hit and miss perfect start though ;). Still a great show over all.

Thanks for doing this.

"This scene with Crash Bandicoot would be awkward, because I don't think he can not smile."

Welp, I can check "laugh like an idiot while a child dies" off of my list of things I've done in my life.

Arakasi:

008Zulu:

varmintx:
It is character development for Joel. He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game. It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout.

Protecting another human being shouldn't be done out of guilt laden obligation.

What should it be done out of?

Pay laden obligation. Nothing is a better motivator than legal tender.

008Zulu:
The kid's death seemed more like character development for the main guy, she wasn't really alive long enough to make any sort of emotional connection. Reminds me of Nameless Kid during the opening of Mass Effect 3.

That's why the very first gameplay is you being Sarah scared and home alone, and watching the situation unfold from the backseat of a car. This gives you that emotional connection. Without it it would've probably been the kid from ME3 all over again, though with much better characterisation.

varmintx:
I have no idea how that is the conclusion you came to from what I said, but that's not what is going on.

As you said;

varmintx:

1- He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game

2- It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout

Arakasi:
What should it be done out of?

Because they need helping.

Casual Shinji:
That's why the very first gameplay is you being Sarah scared and home alone, and watching the situation unfold from the backseat of a car. This gives you that emotional connection. Without it it would've probably been the kid from ME3 all over again, though with much better characterisation.

My point was she wasn't alive long enough to make that connection. If they had killed her off and the end of Act 1, then I could see the emotional aspect of her death since it gave you time to actually bond with the character. As it stands, we are supposed to be sad simply because she is a kid.

008Zulu:

varmintx:
It is character development for Joel. He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game. It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout.

Protecting another human being shouldn't be done out of guilt laden obligation.

No it shouldn't- but if the guilt is there, it completely changes the dynamic of the interaction between protector and protectee.

This is not someone acting out of moral code or societal expectation, lacking a grasp of the severity of failure. This is someone who's been in the role before and failed- he knows what happens if he screws up. There's also a double whammy of self-redemption and frustration over being able to succeed for a stranger but not his own child.

Basically, it makes the whole thing way more interesting than being good because it's good.

As for connecting emotionally to Sarah... well, you weren't really supposed to excactly- the game gives you just enough to see Sarah was a real person, not just a backstory element that's easy to write off entirely. Makes the whole 'my daughter died' thing MEAN something.

Guess what: you didn't actually manage to make it funny.

008Zulu:

Casual Shinji:
That's why the very first gameplay is you being Sarah scared and home alone, and watching the situation unfold from the backseat of a car. This gives you that emotional connection. Without it it would've probably been the kid from ME3 all over again, though with much better characterisation.

My point was she wasn't alive long enough to make that connection. If they had killed her off and the end of Act 1, then I could see the emotional aspect of her death since it gave you time to actually bond with the character. As it stands, we are supposed to be sad simply because she is a kid.

I don't know, she was to me. Obviously this is just a backstory, but thanks to the terrific performance from both actors you get a very effective father/daughter relationship in a short ammount of time.

And here's the thing, the very second Sarah appears on screen (she's actually the first image the game starts out with) you know she's going to die. And Naughty Dog knew this, which is why they threw a few curveballs. The first character you play is her. This instantly gives her a player connection; Just a few minutes ago you were playing as her wandering around the house not yet aware of the chaos that was about to errupt, and now she's dead. We've all at some point in our youth been in a family situation where we're powerless to do anything about it because we were just kids. So all we could do was just quietly observe the crisis unfold and hope for the best. The intro perfectly recreates that sensation, but with the added punch of the observer dying. Again, we knew she was going to, but with everything that preceeded it, it adds a lot more weight.

Another one is how she died. I'm sure I wasn't the only one who thought she was gonna get bit or outright killed by a zombie. But instead it's the person they thought would protect them who ends up killing her. Thinking they were out of the woods only to immediate walk into the lion's den.

And all of this is not written in simply for the sake of Joel wanting to protect Ellie. Because when they first meet Joel doesn't give a shit about Ellie at all. In the 20 years he spent in the apocalypse there've probably been countless teenage girls he's seen get killed. To him this is just the next one in line. Initially it's actually Tess who bonds with Ellie and strikes up conversations with her. The scene where they find out Ellie's secret and the military comes sniffing around, Joel just runs and leaves Ellie and it's Tess who helps her on her feet. The guilt laden obligation for Joel to protect Ellie actually comes from Tess, and it isn't untill halfway through the game that Joel protects Ellie because he genuinely cares about her. The purpose of the backstory doesn't really come in effect untill the second half of the game.

008Zulu:

Casual Shinji:
That's why the very first gameplay is you being Sarah scared and home alone, and watching the situation unfold from the backseat of a car. This gives you that emotional connection. Without it it would've probably been the kid from ME3 all over again, though with much better characterisation.

My point was she wasn't alive long enough to make that connection. If they had killed her off and the end of Act 1, then I could see the emotional aspect of her death since it gave you time to actually bond with the character. As it stands, we are supposed to be sad simply because she is a kid.

honestly, I agree.

I can respect what the game was trying to do, and the opening was certainly unpleasant to experience, but there wasn't enough time spent with the character to make her death especially impacting, at least for me. Indeed, the whole opening was framed in such a way (driving home how almost picturesque-ly happy the family was) that it pretty much screamed that the poor girl was doomed... well, okay... normally after watching a bunch of scenes like that I would have assumed the father was going to die... but her father was on the box, so... nice knowing you, kid. XD

the opening did a good job of setting the tone for the infection, and serving as a reason for Joel's actions later, but I had no especial emotional attachment to Joel's daughter. there was the tragedy that always comes from seeing someone innocent killed, but no personal feeling of loss.

It might just be because I'm not too sensitive about dead kids, might be that I've never played the game, might be that a lot of other perfectly human lives were snuffed out without a care in that cutscene, but I found this episode hilarious.

Granted, Robert Fucking came a little after the girl died, but I laughed harder than I did in the previous two episodes at that little string of gags.

LaughingAtlas:
It might just be because I'm not too sensitive about dead kids, might be that I've never played the game, might be that a lot of other perfectly human lives were snuffed out without a care in that cutscene, but I found this episode hilarious.

Yeah, I could say the same thing. Well, I don't know about hilarious, but humorous, at least. I guess it was "From the studios that brought you Crash Bandicoot!" that had me break down in giggles. Still feels so wrong to laugh at a scene like that...

Hmm, they did make it funny. Now I feel like a dick for laughing at a dying girl...

The scene is still very powerful and moving but I did laugh when Graham said the whole "From the studio that brought you Crash bandicoot" joke so kudos to you guys.

I couldn't stop laughing at the 'Naughty Dog' bit. XD
I wondered if you would do a third part, and you done it brilliantly!

Wow, I was not expecting you guys to do a Part 3 o.o

I haven't gotten around to this one yet (although it is high up my list) so the emotion didn't pack quite the same punch... particularly with the jokes leading all the way up to it. However that is... still too damn sad :( I did laugh though at the thought of Crash Bandicoot just there, watching and grinning as this happens before him :D

008Zulu:

varmintx:
It is character development for Joel. He has to protect a kid for the rest of the game. It's rather important to keep his daughter's death in mind throughout.

Protecting another human being shouldn't be done out of guilt laden obligation.

So therefore don't protect another human being?

Really?

Kant is okay, but that doesn't mean you need to become a monster and not help people, even if you have some selfish reasons for it.

chkdsk1991:
Guess what: you didn't actually manage to make it funny.

I'd say you are demonstratively wrong.

008Zulu:

Arakasi:
What should it be done out of?

Because they need helping.

You may find this applicable and interesting: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utility_monster
Just replace utility with need.

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