Rhymes With Mitty

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I really don't agree with how bob says the e-harmony plot in this movie is a issue because product placement. That is THE BEST kind of product placement we could have in a movie, and the way it just fits in it is perfect. As someone who works on advertising myself, I could not appreciate this part of the movie more. I hope we see more of this in more movies. It cuts on the "annoying" ads that play before the movie (or before an youtube video for example), and don't get in the way of the story itself.

And I just loved the rest of the entire movie. Just so effin beautiful.

I didn't get that impression from the Benjamin Button bit at all.

I thought it was making fun of its corny writing and Walter's misremembering of the movie.

I totally disagree with Bob's review.

In fact, I'd compare Bob's dislike of this movie, with Ebert's dislike of Fight Club. In both cases, the critics are doing what they love as their jobs, and totally don't get how the movie would appeal to people who see their jobs more as something they're stuck in rather then one they came to from following their passion.

I'm not saying the movie is perfect, but it's a beautiful and escapist view of a guy stuck in a job who find himself getting out in the world and living his dreams, following what he feels is important in life. I enjoyed the movie for its message, and also being funny too.

Minor spoilers below as I rebut some of Bob's points:

The daydreams, including the Armstrong ones, show what Mitty is like when his ID truely manifests. What he WANTS to happen, how he WANTS people to treat him. The one with his boss and Armstrong demonstrates his desire for confrontation and ability to hold his own but he's snapped back to reality by the boss overtly demonstrating that he's the one in charge, and Mitty doing nothing to respond. By the end of the movie, Mitty speaks to the boss on his own terms, showing how he's changed. The frequency of the daydreams over the course of the movie is also important to the plot, but that's another subject.

Finally, the meeting up with the guy at the end. I thought that was just a great example of how there's always a human being at the other end of the phone, and just because we have our adventures doesn't mean we should write them up.

Just saw this and have to say Bob seemed unnecessarily harsh on it. I didn't love it, I expected it to be worse than it was but it was pretty good.

I mean, Stiller is 48, true but Mitty is 42. It says it like 5 minutes into the film. I mean if you're going to be a critic maybe pay attention.

Nice try, Bob.

There's a scene (depressingly) early on that typifies the film: Through contrivances too awkward to explain, Walter has wound up back at the office with his childhood Stretch Armstrong doll in tow.

It was a birthday present (seriously they kind of drew attention to his being 42). It was given to him just before he went to work. That scene also shows what Walter was like at the beginning. He wanted to be stand up for himself but he was afraid. That was the point of the daydream sequences. There was also actually very few of those and they're all in the first half hour.

BrotherRool:
2013-1984 = 29

If Ben Stiller is 48 years old that means he was at least 17. That's okay isn't it? (Just being a maths pedant)

Unless I'm missing something 48-29 = 19.

Spot1990:

BrotherRool:
2013-1984 = 29

If Ben Stiller is 48 years old that means he was at least 17. That's okay isn't it? (Just being a maths pedant)

Unless I'm missing something 48-29 = 19.

Oops =D

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