The Walking Dead - Season 4 Recap: Babies Are Delicious

The Walking Dead - Season 4 Recap: Babies Are Delicious

AMC's The Walking Dead is returning on Sunday, February 9th. Here's your refresher.

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I find myself exclaiming, "Nooooo! Not the character who was made up for the TV show which no one cares about or even remembers the name of!" quite often in that show.

There's 5 people who can't die: Rick, Daryl, Carl, Michone, and Glenn. Esp Daryl. He dies, we riot.

(yes, I realize he was made up for the show. no, I don't care)

1) Governor didn't shoot the cancer patient. He bashed his head in just as said ex-father grabbed onto the wailing daughter and was about to bite her.

2) I very much doubt the episode was only to make us feel sympathy for him. I also think you have a terrible analysis of him. He was never a truly sympathetic character, and no one would ever even try to think that if they, you know, watched the series. Yet that's true of many in Walking Dead. He was very much control-oriented, and the fact Rick refused total abandonment drives him to break him. I would argue though that he did take care of the people living in Woodbury as well as any individual could, deceptive as he may of been, and that the biggest reason he likely ever considered any prolonged aggression with the Prison crew was out of spite; spite in invading his town as they did (as justified as it was), and spite for the "murder" of his daughter.

The whole zombie head in an aquarium thing is... well, you kind of got me there. But a man already willing to keep his zombified daughter locked up; going through every precaution you would around a typical zombie while also treating her as if she was still alive, likely isn't too far from just watching a bunch of zombie heads floating around and brooding either. She was his link to what little humanity he had ironically, shaky as that link was, so her death drove him to a rather dark place.

And the biggest think you ignored, here, is the similar sort of arc he goes through within season 4. A man building himself up, threatened by others (this time Martinez instead of Rick), and as a result of his desire for control eventually breaks down what little good he had as it crashes around him. It spanned a couple episodes this time, but the episodes made it obvious that the little girl served as his surrogate daughter, right up to her eventual re-death as a zombie leading to his downfall, this time literally.

It wasn't big, it wasn't fancy, but it was brutal and fast. People wouldn't of been interested in seeing his entire 3rd season arc repeated for more than a few episodes, and they knew it. The confrontation at the prison definitely felt a little forced in part thanks to that, but it served it's purpose well enough.

cursedseishi:

2) I very much doubt the episode was only to make us feel sympathy for him. I also think you have a terrible analysis of him. He was never a truly sympathetic character, and no one would ever even try to think that if they, you know, watched the series. Yet that's true of many in Walking Dead. He was very much control-oriented, and the fact Rick refused total abandonment drives him to break him. I would argue though that he did take care of the people living in Woodbury as well as any individual could, deceptive as he may of been, and that the biggest reason he likely ever considered any prolonged aggression with the Prison crew was out of spite; spite in invading his town as they did (as justified as it was), and spite for the "murder" of his daughter.

The series seemed to be trying to play the "he was a good man, once, long before the series started" card, with Milton last season talking about how the woodbury settlement was established with the best of intentions, and the governor himself had changed drastically since. Control really was his fetish from the moment he first appeared on screen, though. Pretty much the only reason one can think of for why he killed the soldiers instead of giving them asylum was because he was afraid of their authority eventually overriding his own.

The whole zombie head in an aquarium thing is... well, you kind of got me there. But a man already willing to keep his zombified daughter locked up; going through every precaution you would around a typical zombie while also treating her as if she was still alive, likely isn't too far from just watching a bunch of zombie heads floating around and brooding either. She was his link to what little humanity he had ironically, shaky as that link was, so her death drove him to a rather dark place.

In the comics it was stated to basically be what he did instead of watching TV, but comic governor is a pretty different animal from TV governor. For TV governor, you can interpret his little aquarium hobby to be an extension of his need to be in control. He has the heads of the walkers, now robbed of their agency and completely unable to do any harm, and then he sits down in front of them, knowing that their instincts will make them want to come after him, but he's made them incapable of doing so.

Reading this again reminded me, Rick is the worst leader.

Seriously, his son is better for the role now. Carol made the right call, but she didn't make it fast enough. I found it ridiculous that she accepted Rick stepping up once again and making a terrible decision by kicking her out. She just went with it, and yes her life was in danger from the angry bf of the girl she put out of her misery, but urgh, that whole scene annoyed me to no end.

Rick just isn't capable as a leader, but he seems to be destined to be the hero that leads everyone (to their doom).

I like the show, but Rick's loony leadership is not my favourite part.

I just hope telltale comes out with episode 2 of the game series soon, more excited about that than for the TV series.

But heck, I'll probably watch it anyho.

I found Judith!
image

Who's a cute widdle asskicker? You! Oh yes you are!

Aww don't worry. She can't bite us if she doesn't have teeth. She's just....more hungry.

I liked the six episode arc about the virus; it really showed that there were things just as deadly (if not more deadly) as zombies in the world and that, even if they were safe behind their walls, there were things that could still get through and kill them.

Calling it right now:

Governor isn't dead.

Judith isn't dead.

Jeez, that's what 'The Governor' looks like now? He's looking more and more like a caricature with each passing week.

I stopped watching this series after it became apparent to me just how different they wanted to make it from the comic. I mean, the author himself is on board, so it's not like I'm really even upset about that. But in terms of what they have done with the characters, I just can't bring myself to like it. So I stopped right around season 2, mostly because I knew they were going to handle The Governor and his story arc poorly. From what I can glean from this, it looks like I guessed right.

I'm glad the show exists and I'm glad that it's popular, and it's not like I tell everyone they should read the comics instead, but each time I read a synopsis for 'where the show is now', I find myself glad I didn't watch any of it.

The_Echo:
Calling it right now:

Governor isn't dead.

Judith isn't dead.

In this genre, it's never more certain that a person will live than when their death is implied but not directly shown.

The_Echo:
Calling it right now:

Governor isn't dead.

Judith isn't dead.

If either one happens I think I'll stop watching this series altogether. Because then they've completely screwed up their relationship with the comics.

It wouldn't surprise me, but everytime that happens the series has gone way downhill by trivializing events and taking away the backbone of certain characters.
Like Andrea, who was a weak character in the series but a hardened and scarred gunslinger in the comics (and still alive there).

I'm glad I stopped watching, this just seems like more bullshit after bullshit. Especially since they still have the governor around. He's just crazy, the blandest of antagonists.

cursedseishi:
1) Governor didn't shoot the cancer patient. He bashed his head in just as said ex-father grabbed onto the wailing daughter and was about to bite her.

There's that. And also; Rick and Carl didn't burst into the quarantine zone so far as i remember. They used the automatic rifles to mow down the horde that had managed to breach their fence at one point.

And the reason why the Governor turned down Rick's suggestion for all of them to live together in peace wasn't because he didn't want to, it was because he couldn't trust Rick since he felt like they were the ones responsible for Woodbury being destroyed.

Overall i'm curious to see where they all end up after that whole thing. Didn't watch the latest episode yet, but i'll definitely be getting around to that soon.

 

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