The Nostalgia Factor

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The Nostalgia Factor

The various things I've said about the new console generation and their respective hardware gimmicks might have given you the impression that I'm some kind of stubborn ageing neophobe who insists that everything stay exactly the way I like it forever. Nothing could be further from the truth

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I honestly never thought of the Mighty No. 9 thing that way. It was dumb though.

I like how the column usually ties in with some of the banter you share with Gabe in your "Let's Drown Out" series. One week you'll end up talking about nostalgia with him, get a different opinion, and then throughly discuss and expand your own viewpoint.

As always, good article. The current state isn't helpful to people like me who didn't grow up playing old NES/SNES games and discovered them on their own later, we don't get every single in-joke or reason to have these throwback mechanics. Yes, those old games were fun and they're choc full of things we can learn from them, but enough is enough. Time for some change.

I do miss the days of real games for real gamers, like Action 52 and Rambo on the NES. Now, instead of imaginative new games like that, all we get are Zelda sequels.

P.S. Thanks

Ah, nostalgia. You'd cringe at some of the comments made at our family dinners. "It's not like it used to be, the 70's were great" (really, in the UK? Really?), a constant whine about football stadiums no longer doing standing sections and H&S ruining the spirit of the game (that one was during the Hillsborough inquiry) or "this technology gaffe is ruining things" (from a doctor. Shortly after I had an accident that would have left me dead but for recent advances in medical technology) and my personal favorite, declining moral standards and "the youth of today". Don't even get me started on that one!

And more on topic, I can't believe anyone seriously thinks that games were actually objectively better 20 years ago and that somehow games have progressively worsened. I mean I know some people do think like that but I still struggle to believe it.

Yes, in the US we have a large amount of people (many of them influenced by a huge Australian media conglomerate) who are dead set against progress. And yet, things still progress. So, let them speak loudly and carry a small stick.
What really cracks me up however are the fresh immigrants to this country (people who still have thick accents) who complain that there are too many immigrants...wtf. It's bad enough we have people who's grandparents immigrated here whining about immigrants.

But, oh yea, games. If you want to "blame" something, I think Braid posers should get a 'wag of the finger.' We get a good side scroller and all of a sudden all the dev studios that aren't working on AAA FPSs are making retro side scrollers. The other part of it is economics, a publisher is more likely to make its money back from a cheap retro style game than something with the production value of a God of War game. The way I see it, these devs would probably be making shovelware in either regard, at least now they're making shovelware that wont bankrupt anybody. See? Progress.

They refer to themselves as Irish or Italian despite having spent less time in Europe than a fucking Canadian moose.

I'll have you know that Canadian moose are in the 70th percentile economic bracket, and regularly take trips to Europe for honeymoons and other coitus-inducing reasons.

I wonder where Pillars of Eternity fits in this. We'll probably have to wait to see.

It's depressing to have not grown up in the time when the games people are remaking now were being made. Playing them will just give me a sour opinion on the original games. Nostalgia is quite the toxic substance, yet it tastes so sweet, like doughnuts.

See the problem is we've seen what's outside the comfort zone. We've been seeing what's outside the comfort zone for years.

With absolute garbage like Dungeon Keeper Mobile showing us what happens when "progress" is made, maybe the notion that things used to be better isn't so far fetched after all.

I get the feeling that this got written because Yahtzee just reviewed an example of the bad sort of nostalgia, Might & Magic X. Don't get me wrong, I am enjoying the game immensely, but when I find out I can't train Endurance to Expert at the starting town because the trainer there only teaches at the Master level (what??) it's obvious they only build things like this because that's how the older games did it. It's especially galling since I've recently played the Etrian Odyssey series which apes a similar style of game but goes on to streamline the experience significantly without sacrificing challenge.

Still, nostalgia has brought us a lot of excellent things like Bastion and XCOM, so it's not nearly all bad.

Thanatos2k:
See the problem is we've seen what's outside the comfort zone. We've been seeing what's outside the comfort zone for years.

With absolute garbage like Dungeon Keeper Mobile showing us what happens when "progress" is made, maybe the notion that things used to be better isn't so far fetched after all.

I had a lengthy post typed up but you mostly said what I was thinking in fewer words.

One never knows what they have until they lose it. A large amount of staples we at one time took for granted are fading away and in its place we get an array of games and business practices which are clearly a case of publishers stacking the deck against consumers.

Which is where I believe most of our nostalgia comes from; not from the desire to not progress things, but from a desire to have more of what we had that we can objectively quantify as good. A desire to simply bring more good into an industry which is thriving off a negative cycle of bad sportsmanship and greedy tactics.

I agree that conservatism is bad but I do think your overreacting, even if they are popular old school games are still nowhere near as popular as normal games (besides Nintendo).

Also artist are just as responsible for the rise of old school games as the audience if not more so, or do you think that artist are immune to nostalgia?

Also most people don't want a new tim Schafer adventure game because of nostalgia, they want it because they like Tim Schafer adventure games and would like to see a new one, if they did just want monkey island again they would ask for a remake.

Sticky:

Thanatos2k:
See the problem is we've seen what's outside the comfort zone. We've been seeing what's outside the comfort zone for years.

With absolute garbage like Dungeon Keeper Mobile showing us what happens when "progress" is made, maybe the notion that things used to be better isn't so far fetched after all.

I had a lengthy post typed up but you mostly said what I was thinking in fewer words.

One never knows what they have until they lose it. A large amount of staples we at one time took for granted are fading away and in its place we get an array of games and business practices which are clearly a case of publishers stacking the deck against consumers.

Which is where I believe most of our nostalgia comes from; not from the desire to not progress things, but from a desire to have more of what we had that we can objectively quantify as good. A desire to simply bring more good into an industry which is thriving off a negative cycle of bad sportsmanship and greedy tactics.

I concur with your opinion. The awful, awful, awful business practices publishers and devs are getting into these days make one think of the time were games weren't squeezed to the bone and sold piecemeal all over the place. Or at least it wasn't done as publicly and with such cinicism.

"And through that process you can see microcosmic examples of nostalgia becoming a conduit for conservatism and mistrust of the outsider. Look at all that retardation that surrounded Mighty No. 9 when the community of backers threw a collective shit-fit over the controversial hiring of a community manager who - through either being a woman, a feminist or a non-Megaman fan, depending on who you ask - committed the sin of being NOT ONE OF US."

Another example is Sonic Boom, of which instead of the doubts that we have all developed over the late 2000s, some people are most concerned about the characters wearing bandages and having exaggerated muscles, bones, and attitudes. If you ask me, Sonic has been through so much abuse that regardless of whether it will be a good game (probably will be, as it has the gameplay of Sonic Adventure and the multiplayer of Super Mario 3D World), it stands as an appropriately hilarious concept between its characters and Skrillex-dubstep soundtrack so far.

There's a famous saying from Henry Ford: "If I'd asked the public what they wanted, they'd have said a faster horse." The only difference between the latest Call of Duty being a carbon copy of its predecessor and the latest Legend of Zelda being a carbon copy of a game made 20-some-odd years ago is time.

Thanatos2k:
See the problem is we've seen what's outside the comfort zone. We've been seeing what's outside the comfort zone for years.

With absolute garbage like Dungeon Keeper Mobile showing us what happens when "progress" is made, maybe the notion that things used to be better isn't so far fetched after all.

I hope you're attempting to explain the obsession with nostalgia rather than excuse it. Yahtzee could probably write a whole column on this stupid false dichotomy alone, and I'd quite appreciate if he did. Just because the mainstream gaming industry refuses to come up with new ideas that don't suck doesn't mean everyone else has to.

"Bad nostalgia sometimes goes by other names, such as "conservatism". The desire for things to stay the same, unmixed with people and concepts from outside our comfort zone. Nostalgia is a string to the bow of everyone with an anti-progressive agenda. They can use phrases like "Traditional values" to add a facade of quaint, down-homey charm to their knee-jerk hatred of the outsider."

Yeah, progressives are always right! Like when they advocated for eugenics, so that we could purge society of undesirables! Too bad those pesky conservatives had to complain about things like "human rights" and "crimes against nature."

Honestly, I'm NOT a conservative, but to make blanket terms like that are somewhat ignorant. Progressives are just as bad as Conservatives, maybe even worse. They're just bad in different ways. It's easy to pretend the progressives are better because all the bad ideas get weeded out. This is the mindset that leads to blind party loyalties... think for yourself Yahtzee.

I feel that people are fundamentally misunderstanding what conservatism is.

Conservatism, at it's most fundamental ideals is about personal responsibility. A conservative believes in the power of the individual, and that individual's ability to take care of themselves and those they care about. A conservative believes in hard work, and living within one's means. This is what we mean when we talk about "traditional values".

Conservatives are not against progress. But progress for progress' sake, however, is bad. Progress needs to be tempered with perspective, not idealism. Good progress must be slow, because if we start progressing faster and faster without restraint, we end up creating a lot of waste that buries us and prevents us from seeing where we came from and where we are going. We end up directionless.

I do not want this to become a political debate, because this is not the forum for that. I'm just trying to clear up the misconception. I would also encourage everyone to educate themselves about conservatism so they can make up their own minds about the issue as well.

Now, as to the main point of the article, I agree that video games, and the pop culture industry in general, are relying on nostalgia too much. Nostalgia is not perspective, and it has diminishing returns. The game industry is going to shoot itself in the foot if they're still mining the 80's and 90's after everyone who lived in those years have passed on.

I agree that nostalgia for nostalgia's sake alone is wrong.
And yes many developers and publishers are taking advantage of the "rose coloured glasses" phenomenon by releasing half baked attempts to cash in on nostalgia. But acting like this is something new to our present time is foolhardy. Ever hear the term "the greatest generation"?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greatest_Generation
I'd suggest there was just a bit of nostalgia for a better time involved in that moniker. We are constantly comparing today to our past, it's normal and to be expected.
But I find it really funny that someone who's ranting against nostalgia is also an admitted proponent of one of the oldest if not the oldest game form in gaming, the adventure game. Or as I like to call them "hunt the pixel".
There are two things I think should be kept in mind here "there is nothing new under the sun" and "everything is built upon the past".
I as well played the earlier M&M games and loved them. But one thing I've noticed by about 85-90% of the people who complain about some aspect of M&M X, they also say they're really enjoying it. Funny that eh?
In a previous post I tried to explain the design philosophy behind the game. You need to be thinking and planning constantly. Placing all the trainers in one place would simplify the game, but you wouldn't have to pay attention to everything in case it was important later.
Ultimately for me I could care less about nostalgia either way. If a game is fun I'm in. For example I love tower defense which is a relatively new genre'. In fact my favorite right now is Prime World: Defenders. Both a TD and a collectible card game, and I've never played a collectable card game before. I think my problem is when someone tries to be new and different for that reason and no other. I've played and abandoned so many games because they try to reinvent the wheel, and end up with a complete monstrosity that can't roll more than two feet. As the saying goes "Gameplay is king" (okay the guy was a bit of douche but he was still right). There is a current game in beta on steam called War for the Overworld Bedrock, and I swear it's the first promised "spiritual successor" to Dungeon Keeper that actually feels like it. SO is that a bad thing? A game that was fun in the past being recreated to be fun today?
For me? not a chance.
Gamers just want to have fun, not get bogged down in philosophical discussions on the subject of if this or that current trend in gaming is a good thing. Well that's all this gamer wants, to have fun. Is that too much to ask?

Oh Christ. *ughhhh*

I was like,
"Oh hey, Moviebob already did a video about this topic a few years ago. I'm glad that Yahtzee is going to say something new about it, and isn't going to summon the horrifically asinine, reprehensibly not-thought-out accusation that people whose main political platform centers around the maintenance or restoration of the past are doing it because they're 'nostalgic' about it."

But then no, good shit, Ben just blabs out the same lazy, poorly-thought-out statement.

Because yeah, people supporting 1890's States Rights models are just doing it because they're nostalgic, and 130 years old.

Okay, now to read the rest of the article to see if you EVENTUALLY get to something of substance.

Oh nice, there's actually more inane nonsense.

"I shall now talk about Americans by using the word 'they'. The number of Americans I've talked to and known in my life is well enough to be able to accurately represent the entire nation. Or, the amount of emotional, biased TV coverage I've watched about Americans in my den is enough to know what the whole country is like."

To be honest, xenophobia and hostility against other cultures is something I've almost never come across in my life as a Missourian.

I'm glad you don't immediately accuse anyone who had a beef with whats-her-face of just hating her for being a woman. Like Moviebob, who's recent Sarkeesian article implied that those who disagree with her and those who are anti-strong-female-character misogynists are one and the same.

isdestroyer:

I do not want this to become a political debate, because this is not the forum for that.

Well we do have a certain part of the forum for this kind of talk, but a lot of us try to stay out of it.

Though I agree with your post that Yatzee saying that conservatism is the root of all the wrong in the world is unfair and narrow minded. I would say the exact thing if he had said the same about liberalism as well.

Blanketing whole political ideologies like that does not help with civil discourse, but Yatzee is not known for being a cordial fellow anyway. XD

Though I do agree with some of the points he made about the games industry, however I feel like the notion of "going back to basics" in terms of game design can make for a better game. In some cases tech limitations were what made some classic games so good, the developers didn't have the need to put a bunch of useless stuff in to hope it turns out better. I may have gone a bit off topic, but I believe there are some strengths to old school game design that one could mistake for nostalgia mongering.

I agree completely. Whenever I see Early Access and developers constantly asking their backers what they want in the game, it infuriates me. If I backed a game, it is because I have faith in you, the developers, to make the game you want to make. I believed in your product. Go make it. To hell with what I think, or want. I already gave you my money. Go make the game you want to make. Stop asking what every brain dead moron wants. There is a reason most video game players aren't video game developers, they would suck at it.

Steve the Pocket:
There's a famous saying from Henry Ford: "If I'd asked the public what they wanted, they'd have said a faster horse." The only difference between the latest Call of Duty being a carbon copy of its predecessor and the latest Legend of Zelda being a carbon copy of a game made 20-some-odd years ago is time.

Thanatos2k:
See the problem is we've seen what's outside the comfort zone. We've been seeing what's outside the comfort zone for years.

With absolute garbage like Dungeon Keeper Mobile showing us what happens when "progress" is made, maybe the notion that things used to be better isn't so far fetched after all.

I hope you're attempting to explain the obsession with nostalgia rather than excuse it. Yahtzee could probably write a whole column on this stupid false dichotomy alone, and I'd quite appreciate if he did. Just because the mainstream gaming industry refuses to come up with new ideas that don't suck doesn't mean everyone else has to.

But games are entertainment. A product that companies produce to sell to consumers. Why is it a bad thing to give the people what they want? If people are entertained by the same thing with a slightly different twist or a new story slapped onto the same gameplay mechanics, I fail to see the sin in making something that is the same level of quality without completely changing everything and selling it to them.

McDonald's has been doing it for decades.

What does "progress" even mean in the realm of video games, and why does one HAVE to have it?

"But what about COD?! People like you bash on it all the time for doing that!" you might exclaim.

I don't hate something like COD because it doesn't change, I hate it because having played better shooters a decade ago on the PC I know that it's bad to begin with. I would happily buy sequel after sequel to Baldur's Gate if they were made with the same level of quality even if the gameplay systems barely changed. But we get so few games like Baldur's Gate now, not because the game doesn't work, but because of "progress." And yet the new RPGs that come out (like Dragon Age 2 *vomit*) still aren't better than Baldur's Gate is *today.* They might have better graphics. They might have a better framerate. They might have better voice acting, and motion capture, and branching dialogue trees, and might work on consoles, and have worlds 5x as big, and have non-linear stories, and might have some nonsense social network integration. And yet, even today, most are not better games. That's not nostalgia talking - Bioware has gone on record saying they could never make something as good as Baldur's Gate again, and it's just sad.

That's why when someone comes along and says "We're going to make a sequel to Planescape Torment" or "We're going to make a new Megaman game" people hurl money by the millions - they want the same QUALITY of experience that the market has refused to give them. They know a game like Planescape Torment is worth their time. They know a game like Megaman X is worth their time. Bioware or Capcom sure as hell isn't giving it to them. Progress did not produce better games, and in many cases we're seeing "progress" ruin games.

isdestroyer:
I feel that people are fundamentally misunderstanding what conservatism is.

Conservatism, at it's most fundamental ideals is about personal responsibility. A conservative believes in the power of the individual, and that individual's ability to take care of themselves and those they care about. A conservative believes in hard work, and living within one's means. This is what we mean when we talk about "traditional values".

Conservatives are not against progress. But progress for progress' sake, however, is bad. Progress needs to be tempered with perspective, not idealism. Good progress must be slow, because if we start progressing faster and faster without restraint, we end up creating a lot of waste that buries us and prevents us from seeing where we came from and where we are going. We end up directionless.

I do not want this to become a political debate, because this is not the forum for that. I'm just trying to clear up the misconception. I would also encourage everyone to educate themselves about conservatism so they can make up their own minds about the issue as well.

You know, it's not helping that you have a picture of an Imperial Star Destroyer as your icon while you try to make this point, lol. Reading your words with the Imperial March theme in your head makes things take an entirely different slant.

The problem has less to do with nostalgia and more to do with the old companies growing into vertically structured corporations with a web of developers linked to the central hub. It's kind of like the university political system, except instead of professors we have game designers trying to pitch ideas to a centralized committee and pleading for funding. Kickstarter hasn't really gotten away from the pleading for funding part, but at least the stakeholders they are pleading to are the general public, who just want to see fun and interesting titles that take advantage of the old characters we know and love.

You know what I'm nostalgic for? I'm nostalgic for a time before social media when I didn't constantly hear about developers acting like politicians, spoiled children, or both.

Well the thing is the "progress" we've been seeing now has been nothing but trash. So as far as I'm concerned I will gladly stay in the bubble.

For one, you actually got a full fucking game for $60.00 a lot more often than you got a half complete game for the same price that's piecemealed to you for $15.00 each.

Secondly, in the past people made games because they wanted to. Now it's all just focus group test lists and trying to grab that CoD money.

The list goes on and on.

Nostalgia is taking such a hard on now because what IS the future now is being screwed over, over priced DLC, and being given the middle finger on content if you bought a game on a studios unfavorable console. Yeah, that sure as hell sounds great.

Thanatos2k:

isdestroyer:
I feel that people are fundamentally misunderstanding what conservatism is.

Conservatism, at it's most fundamental ideals is about personal responsibility. A conservative believes in the power of the individual, and that individual's ability to take care of themselves and those they care about. A conservative believes in hard work, and living within one's means. This is what we mean when we talk about "traditional values".

Conservatives are not against progress. But progress for progress' sake, however, is bad. Progress needs to be tempered with perspective, not idealism. Good progress must be slow, because if we start progressing faster and faster without restraint, we end up creating a lot of waste that buries us and prevents us from seeing where we came from and where we are going. We end up directionless.

I do not want this to become a political debate, because this is not the forum for that. I'm just trying to clear up the misconception. I would also encourage everyone to educate themselves about conservatism so they can make up their own minds about the issue as well.

You know, it's not helping that you have a picture of an Imperial Star Destroyer as your icon while you try to make this point, lol. Reading your words with the Imperial March theme in your head makes things take an entirely different slant.

Indeed. The irony is not lost on me. ;)

Thanatos2k:
See the problem is we've seen what's outside the comfort zone. We've been seeing what's outside the comfort zone for years.

With absolute garbage like Dungeon Keeper Mobile showing us what happens when "progress" is made, maybe the notion that things used to be better isn't so far fetched after all.

I think you could go farther with that thought.

We see what's outside of the comfort zone, and with an increasing amount of scrutiny for this aging medium, things just look like they suck more, and this is solidified by us simply having more substantial evidence for the fact.

True progress would be both getting out of the nostalgia bubble AND the greed/shady business practices plaguing the industry NOW, or at least get past consumers' scrutiny for such.

One wonders if consumers are even ready for that progress, though.

I kinda disagree on this, sure kickstarter is built on nostalgia but most of the really successful kickstarters are for games in genres that just don't exist anymore capcom refuses to make another megaman game and bioware has moved on from making baldurs gate style of rpg is that a bad thing? no mass effect is great, does that mean people who want another baldurs gate style game are living in the past? absolutely not because it is a fundamentally different game from what is being released now. For all it's failings I think kickstarter is a net positive for the games industry it gives devs a chance to make a game they can be passionate about, and not the game about which terrorists the gruff middle aged white soldier and his sassy ethnic partner foil this week.

Yahtzee Croshaw:
The Nostalgia Factor

The various things I've said about the new console generation and their respective hardware gimmicks might have given you the impression that I'm some kind of stubborn ageing neophobe who insists that everything stay exactly the way I like it forever. Nothing could be further from the truth

Read Full Article

Oh you're one to talk, yahtzee. Who is the one who wrote an entire poem around how he's concerned about all the apparent new directions thief is taking? Also there was the entire bulletstorm review and then the whole "I was into shooters before you were sucking on wiimotes" thing at the end of the medal of honor warfighter and doom 3 BFG edition review.

You may not be nostalgic for mario or even old style adventure games that much, but I've seen your show, yahtzee. You have nostalgia goggles like all the rest of us.

isdestroyer:
I feel that people are fundamentally misunderstanding what conservatism is.

Conservatism, at it's most fundamental ideals is about personal responsibility. A conservative believes in the power of the individual, and that individual's ability to take care of themselves and those they care about. A conservative believes in hard work, and living within one's means. This is what we mean when we talk about "traditional values".

Sigh....

No....

Conservatism literally means a political and social philosophy promoting and retaining (ie conserving) traditional social structures and institutions.

The whole "personal responsibility" thing is something taken from economic rationalism and has stuck with US conservatives because it is the antithesis of big bad socialism/communism (and fascism back when people were scared of that.). The word to describe it is not conservatism, it's "individualism".

Much of the "Conservative Movement" in America (And in England and Australia) is big on individualism (at least economically speaking) and has been since the 1980s, but it is not inherently part of conservatism.

You make a good point of good nostalgia vs bad nostalgia. However,

Yahtzee Croshaw:

Nostalgia is based on the fallacious notion that things were better in the past. They weren't. You were younger, more innocent, less exposed to negative news reports and with a child's inbuilt sense of loyalty, and so you remember it more favorably than it was. Trends show that things have always been on a steady pattern of improvement, with regards to technology, awareness of societal issues, equality, and the reduction of crime and global conflict. There may be more reportage of unpleasantness nowadays, but that doesn't mean there was less unpleasantness in the past, just that we now have access to wonderful technology that allows more information on unpleasantness to be spread around.

This is a mixture of truth and fiction. Simply put yes things to get better but not in every way. Sometimes things get worse and it's important to recognize when they do. Remember evolve just means change over time it does not mean improvement over time

When it comes to PC's things have pretty much only gotten better (with the exception of Windows 8) hardware and backwards compatible have improved drastically.

However with consoles it's another story. Consoles have only gotten worse ever since they left cartirgres in favor of optical.

Now look were we are now. SSD drives are the new thing and optical is obsolete. Those cartridges used the same technology as SSD's which was why they worked so fast and so readability. now that's been traded with long load times, ring scratches and red rings of death.

There is no reason to get a console in this day and age. It's easy to see why people cling to the past, the past earned their trust and respect, while the current console generation has only made it harder to trust the industry. How can you blame anyone for being nostalgic when the next crash is right around the corner.

On top of that when it comes to "modern game mechanics" I'm not sure if modern is a misnomer. Take Bio-shock infinite for example. It uses a combat system very similar to the first Halo; only problem is, Halo came out in 2001 and Bio shock infinite came out in 2013.

The truth is, there's just isn't anything new anymore. Nostalgia now is simply trading one idea of old for another idea of old. But at least those who still love Goldenye 64 aren't kidding themselves :P.

*sigh* Look at all these people telling Yahtzee things he's been saying for years now and LITERALLY STARTED THIS WEEK'S COLUMN BY BRINGING UP as if he were the last person on earth to be made aware of it. How can you people be so nostalgic when you clearly can't hold on to a memory for more than a week?

Oh right. I was also going to say this earlier:

Yahtzee Croshaw:
That's one of the many things I don't understand about the US. It's always positioned itself as a melting pot nation, bring me your huddled masses and all that bollocks, where anyone can come and build a new life from nothing. But in practice, all anyone seems to want to do is cling to the past. They refer to themselves as Irish or Italian despite having spent less time in Europe than a fucking Canadian moose.

I think that has less to do with nostalgia for the Old Country they never lived in, and more a desperate attempt by White Americans to outwardly identify as something, anything they consider to be more interesting than just plain-old White Americans.

Errr, well I think trying to tie nostalgia to politics isn't a good idea. While there are older people here, to be honest at 38 it's not like there is some age where the social policies I mostly argue against weren't in place to some extent. After all I was raped by an older kid at the age of 6 in a residential facility, which would have been 1981 (an experience I have pretty much blocked out but still haunts me). It's not like I sit here and long for the good old days of the 80s before all these gay people were around or anything. (to take one of my more controversial opinions). When most of my solid opinions and political opinions I hold now formed I went from being a fairly forgiving teenager to a cynic in my mid-late 20s and 30s when I was involved in security and such. A lot of people like to criticize people like me for being stuck in the 1950s or whatever, but really I don't think many people are that old. I think it largely comes down to your life experiences and how much you get to see behind the curtain. At the end of the day I can probably fairly claim to be the least racist and anti-bigoted person you'll ever meet because at the end of the day I pretty much seem to wind up hating just about everything and everyone as sad as that is... but it does even out.

That said, the central point when connected to games is a fair one, except that I tend to agree with some of Yahtzee's earlier points from previous ZP episodes and articles more than this one. That is to say that innovation for the sake of innovation is bad, and there is no reason to take something functional and change it simply to be different. A point Yahtzee himself makes all the time in ZP with cute little cartoons and jokes, say about some dude replacing a metal helicopter with one made out of bread, and being surprised when it not only fails to surpass the original but fails in general.

See for the most part what Nostalgia comes down to is people longing for things that were good, but people decided to stop doing for no particular reason. There interest was there, it still is, just nobody does it anymore, and when they do it tends to be a half hearted effort that winds up failing because it's half hearted nature is obvious and drags it down (which ironically causes the guys who made it to neglect that kind of product even more). For example, while a lot of people HATE turn based RPGs, or deep RPGs with lots of numbers and micromanagement involving multiple pages full of numbers for each character, those kinds of games are perfect at what they do, there is no need for them to change, update, or add more action or whatever. They survived so long, and have so many people demanding that kind of game with new graphics and no real "simplification" or "embellishment" to the gameplay itself that this should be obvious. It's like the joke about "Chess 2.0" that Loading, Ready, Run did... some people hate Chess, but at the end of the day it remains what it is because it's pefect at what it set out to be, and still entertains countless people despite the haters. In a lot of cases the glow of "never was" isn't as strong as some people make it out to be, failures to resurrect old properties or style of product fail because they were half arsed cash grabs.

Turn based RPGs probably aren't the best example when referring to Yahtzee's point because he hates those, but meh, it's my rant. :)

The problem right now is the industry has gotten so greedy and unbalanced that it hasn't been able to produce enough games for different audiences. It only tends to aim at the biggest, most immediately profitable audiences and ignore all else, pushing ahead to impress the lowest common denominator.

See right now there is still plenty of room for say old school turn based RPGs, and a market that would make them profitable, and actually when care is taken, a steady source of income. Game companies however aren't interested in a fair profit for a fair amount of work, they want the monster profits of the next "Farmville", "Call Of Duty" or "Candy Crush Saga" so they alternate between cashing in on each other's work, current franchises, and experimentation which is more designed to find the next big mass appeal hit rather than to actually try and please the gamers they know are already out there.

I don't think Nostalgia is the problem, I think the game industry, and the way major niche audiences are neglected, is.

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