10 Marvel Characters Who Should Show Up On Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

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10 Marvel Characters Who Should Show Up On Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A common complaint regarding Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is that it hasn't delivered a ton of Marvel Universe characters. Here's 10 Marvel types that would make a good guest spot.

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I expect a fair few of these, notably Punisher, Moon Knight and probably Taskmaster, are gonna show up through Marvel's Netflix shenanigans, or at least get a reference of some sort. I think it'll be more fitting.

Not only would Taskmaster be awesome to have on there, it would be fairly easy. Just look at how Alphas did basically that same character. That show was FAR from perfect, but that character was great.

if you want to see actual superheros and villains in a comic book show, watch Arrow. It's a better show with superior writing and more interesting characters; basically better everything.

Hm - Moon Knight would be great, actually!

As far as Punisher goes... *sigh* I wish they wouldn't.

Look, I read a lot of Punisher when I was a kid, and it's soooo closely tied to Reagan-era 'Just Say "No"' drug policy that it's practically camp. I can't take the character seriously any more, and I'm not sure that's in any way a bad thing. Even by comic book standards he's a crazy caricature and IMHO he's been a remarkably poor fit with the Marvel universe.

I can't shake the feeling his type has been done better elsewhere - Rorschach + a hard on for the NRA for the 'hard on crime / minority angle, or Deadpool for the foolish ultra violence (while not so fourth wall breaking, Punisher used to have some pretty amusing internal monologues during his improbably-survived firefights).

Punisher would make for a good character on Agents of SHIELD. But I can't agree about Punisher: War Zone. That movie was so wacky. I don't mind a bit of wacky, especially in a comic book film. But it just seemed so out of place in a Punisher story.

The actor who played Frank in that movie was pretty much perfect for the role though.

No thanks. I'd rather have an actual decent show than a showcase for Marvel characters I've never heard of and don't care about.

Thankfully, at the moment, the show's creators seem to agree with me. The last few episodes have been quite solid, and I think there's enough supervillians around now.

Taskmaster: Respectfully, I think most of his garb wouldn't fly, not just the white hood.

Spider-Woman: Skye's probably not her. I suspect her power's going to somewhere on the scale of a minor Phoenix. It would be nice to see Spider-Woman if only to hear Skye say "So did you just pick your name out of a comic book?" She'd probably end up being another Black Widow/Maye-esque character in terms of talents and position within SHIELD but with a much more outgoing personality. Hell, you could make her a slightly less irresponsible Archer with superpowers.

She-Hulk: I can definitely get behind this. Her origin and activity really isn't exactly worth a full movie, but could really work as a 1-2 episode arc. Hey, they could be assisting "Dr. Banner" on something more mundane (like moving him out into an isolated lab in the Rockies or something like that) with his Walters helping him out as the only family who didn't abandon him after whatever origin story is cannon now and who isn't Tony Stark (hell, he could be trying to keep the place a secret from Stark's more outgoing personality). An accident happens (and let's make it an actual accident), Walters is severely injured, and the bus and EMS are too far away or unable to get them (probably the later) and they perform a blood transfusion with the only person with a comparable blood type: Bruise. First episode is the set up, a second episode would be the aftermath as she adjusts to her new more-outgoing personality, excessive strength, and green skin.

Moon Knight: Maybe in a second season. We already got a roving maniacal billionaire to deal with.

The Sentry: I could see this as another "*knock, knock* It's SHIELD. Just making sure you aren't blowing something up" similar to a lower stake "Girl In The Flower Dress."

U.S. Agent: Maybe. I could see him as someone who pops in after Winter Soldier depending on how that whole thing turns out. Alternatively, perhaps he could be retired having served after Captain America disappeared during WWII. Would be a good opportunity for an "origins of SHIELD" Episode.

Baron Wolfgang Von Struker: He could pop up as the main antagonist of the second season who slinks away before they can finish him off. He would be perfect in that role given his mid-boss level stance are in perfect parity for the SHIELD Team. Could even make for a good SHIELD/Avengers tie in.

Blade: Even better: They could be approaching Blade as a specialist to get control of a minor vampire situation, who gives them some pointers before going after bigger fish. On a related note, there were three of those movies and a semi-okay TV show. They could get away with just "here's Blade" because odds are good that the majority of the audience already knows who he is.

Silver Sable: May goes up against her Symkaria counterpart is pretty much what that episode would be like. Hell, they could retcon Dr. Doom as a leader of a non-Nazi Hydra analogue whose sending agents/mercenaries to procure more-difficult to synthesize materials.

The Punisher: Another character that you could gloss over the origins of (or have him explain himself to Skye or May), I could see him and Shield cross paths when the mob accidentally (or "accidentally") get's their hands on a 084.

HBaskerville:
if you want to see actual superheros and villains in a comic book show, watch Arrow. It's a better show with superior writing and more interesting characters; basically better everything.

Did it get better? I saw the first few episodes and I can't say it grabbed me; the characters were pretty bland and one-note.

OT: The Taskmasker would probably work best in their universe with a Batman-style utility belt, carrying small weapons and tools [plus, you could write storylines around trying to prevent him from getting access to footage of the Avengers fighting, which would explain why he isn't armed to the teeth].

Google "Udon Taskmaster" for a variation of his costume that would probably be more fitting. It even got laser armaments!

As much as the show does need a little more to maintain an illusion that this isn't some spy thriller they slapped SHIELD onto to fool the fans, too many runs the risk of overshadowing the main cast and reducing the show to a "live version of character x" of the week show. Want to see what that devolves to, look at the ultimate comics line.

Still, let's see:

Taskmaster: never saw the appeal, but workable
Spider-Woman: workable, but sounds a little too desperate to add superpowers to a show about the normal guys.
She Hulk: I'd rather get the hulk movies back off the ground and have her there than paint a 6 foot 6 actress green.
Moon Knight: Critic favorite, fan dud. Good as a joke maybe.
Sentry: I'm trying to forget him again.
US Agent: Uh, workable ideas in there, but hard to try and sell the show on Cap lite.
Strucker: we already have a generic evil organization baddie right now
Blade: Bad memories of his TV show.
Silver Sable / Punisher: These work in the "ends justify the means" types that would be a good counterpoint to the idealistic Coulson. Your Punisher idea on the other hand requires a stronger super villain population to be viable.

Besides, the backdoor pilot I want is for the Runaways.

Nope, sorry. Gonna have to violently disagree (geddit) that Punisher: War Zone was anything other than an absolute betrayal of the character and a disgusting waste of everyone's time, effort and money.

The best Punisher film we've ever had was '#DirtyLaundry', which is on YouTube and deserves to be watched by everyone who's even remotely curious about the character, because it sums up everything he is in around 10 minutes.

I do agree that The Punisher would work exceptionally well as a TV show, and would like to heartily recommend that they get Thomas Jane to play him. It'd be like getting Nic Cage to play Ghost Rider, only not sucky.

AoS isn't an inherently bad show and could benefit from the addition of a few more Marvel characters but honestly... I can't get behind any of those. Not that I have anything to contribute myself that is however I think that if the show took a divergence from "canon" or references it could actually benefit greatly, as much as they've built it up I have yet to actually see the Clairvoyant as a threat at all. Indeed it might turn out that it/he/she isn't.

On balance the show needs to do a lot more work developing their existing characters and concepts, it'd be nice if they did some actual yannow... spy work? They're about as subtle as a bull in a china shop at the best of times, that goes double for the overall feel of the episodes (much more WHAM than I'd like). I don't mind the flying car, the alien tech, the slightly campy villains or the totally absurd criminal organisations but lets be honest here for a show that was originally billed, at least to me, as "x-files in the marvel universe" it is quickly turning into "a-team in the marvel universe".

If Fox ever gets off their duff about a Deadpool movie, would that scoop up Taskmaster as well since he's typically in Deadpool's rogue gallery?

The Punisher would be interesting to see. He had a huge man-crush on Captain America during the civil war story arc. But I don't think his brutal(?) style would play well with prime-time week day television. Also, the Thomas Jane movie was enjoyable. :P

Part of my problem with the show is yes it only feels like the connections to the Marvel universe come in the name dropping the show does. Other than someone saying Hydra or hey remember the Avengers fight in New York the show could be set in any general near future CSI/spy setting. Not really enough to make it feel like the same world that all the cool movie stuff happens in.

Ouch and I sure would not mind if we could get the show to be something other than super science tech support. It's sort of like a show where people run around fixing the mistakes of Rusty Venture but never ever seeing any of the costumed villainy by the Guild of Calamitous Intent. The cartoons get cool things like jet packs and SHIELD uniforms, the live action movies get the big name costumed heroes and villains of the Marvel universe, Agents of SHIELD gives us some dull people on a dull plane in dull every day clothing in a story that seems like a slow train to nowhere interesting.

But the biggest problem isn't the lack of Marvel the biggest problem is the characters just aren't that great. Kind of sad when you get upset Skye will likely live because it means having to put up with the character again once she's healed up. When you are pulling for the heroes to die something is really wrong with your show.

Dang Bob. Wish you did the writing for that show. What the hell. You should turn in a draft to them or something. Not sure how that would work hahaha but I mean damn. Those are some good ideas man.

The Gentleman:

Blade: Even better: They could be approaching Blade as a specialist to get control of a minor vampire situation, who gives them some pointers before going after bigger fish. On a related note, there were three of those movies and a semi-okay TV show. They could get away with just "here's Blade" because odds are good that the majority of the audience already knows who he is.

The last Blade film was a decade ago (wow does not seem that long ago) and they were all 'R' rated while the TV show was 8 years ago and aired on Spike TV.

With no cartoon appearances since the old 90's Spiderman cartoon (Which is how I'm sure most people who aren't into comics were introduced to the character in the first place) I think a lot of the under 20's audience of AoS probably aren't that familiar with the character anymore.

"Maybe he could get a backdoor-pilot via an appearance on what, despite fan and critic misgivings is still ABC's second most-watched show"

Friday 31st January - 6th February (didn't want the Olympics messing with the ratings)

From TV by the numbers ( http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/ )

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D - 2.2/6rating - 6.62 million viewers

ABC shows that beat AoS in viewers

Last Man Standing - 1.5/5 rating - 6.92 million viewers

Shark Tank - 2.1/7 rating - 7.4 million viewers

The Bachelor - 2.6/7 rating - 8.33 million viewers

Castle - 2.1/6 rating - 10.02 million viewers

The Middle - 2.2/6 rating - 8.56 million viewers

Modern Family - 3.5/9 rating - 9.87 million viewers

ZZoMBiE13:
But I can't agree about Punisher: War Zone. That movie was so wacky. I don't mind a bit of wacky, especially in a comic book film. But it just seemed so out of place in a Punisher story.

Darth Marsden:
Nope, sorry. Gonna have to violently disagree (geddit) that Punisher: War Zone was anything other than an absolute betrayal of the character and a disgusting waste of everyone's time, effort and money.

You're entitled to your opinions, obviously, but you're a little off base in this case. A lot of the "wacky" stuff in P:WZ was taken directly from the comics, specifically the Ennis/War Journal runs IIRC. Those books get a little weird at points.

But it's definitely not "an absolute betrayal".

Kumagawa Misogi:
snip

Perhaps Bob meant "in that format".

"Middle", "Last Man Standing" and "Modern Family" are all half-hour comedies. "Shark Tank" and "The Bachelor" are both reality TV.

The only other "hour long dramatic" on that list is Castle.

The problem I'm having with Agents is that they are creating a decent amount of superheroes/villains in the show (5 at this point?) but they AREN'T DOING ANYTHING WITH THEM. By episode 5 we have already been given what are apparently 2 A-list comic book super-villains, but then they get stuck in a SHIELD box and are never heard from again. Whedon shows do typically have this overly long drawn out start, but this season is just ridiculous.

We're watching a comic book show, but instead of super-villains brooding over plans and monologuing to our heroes with over-dramatic goofiness, we get four people stuck on a plane that all have daddy issues. They don't need to make new bad guys, they just need to actually use the ones that exist.

TiberiusEsuriens:
we get four people stuck on a plane that all have daddy issues

Not to be a stickler but at the very least Ward has mommy issues instead of daddy issues.

I'm sorry bob and everyone else, Blade does and never has belonged to you yanks ;)

image

(so to speak)

I don't exactly keep up with this show but, from what I gather, any superheroes or supervillains at all would be a nice start.

Haaaaaa, no.

How do I put this. Warning: lengthy scrawl ahead.

So, there's this whole, dark/gritty/"realistic" thing that's shown up in recent DC-Universe superhero movies. Bob has done his best to heap fairly indiscriminate hatred on said franchises, often in spite of having mixed-to-positive feelings about the movies presented at the time of first watching.

Tired though I am of that, I don't want to harp; I don't agree, but that's his right, and I think I have a measure of understanding of where it comes from. Dark/gritty/"realistic" pushes his buttons and clashes with what I suspect are somewhat nostalgia-tinged memories of more fun, light, upbeat superheroes of his past. I don't even mean to suggest that there shouldn't be a more varied palette of tone in the tv/video/film versions of the DC Universe; "Arrow" gives me a big old headache, and I remember the TV version of "Flash" that so badly wanted to be Batman; it was kind of embarrassing.

Further, I suspect how MB feels about d/g/"r"'s rulership of certain parts of the modern superhero mindspace is not unlike how I feel about, say, "Transformers" movies, or Adam Sandler movies: they're horrible, but their financial success inevitably means there will be more of them. Even though we're capable of so much better.

So, yeah, I think I get that.

But.

I'm not entirely sure MB has grasped that the way Marvel is oh-so-carefully handling its movie/tv franchises, while not intrinsically d/g/"r" itself, is most definitely a parallel response to a similar problem that d/g/"r" is trying to address.

Namely: a story about superheroes is not inherently a story that's relatable to the people watching it.

DC's answer to this has been mostly in the worlds it has presented. We may quietly laugh at the unlikelihood of a millionaire taking to the streets with his high-tech armor and his martial arts training to combat crime (and no one quite figuring out how his two personas intersect), but it presents a world with enough parallels to our own that most of us suspend disbelief. Batman's story is human-scale, in a lot of ways; the people seem mortal and breakable, the villains not all that far off of the news stories that horrify us in the daily paper. The recent "Man of Steel" tried something similar in suggesting that god-like powers didn't always convey the ability to prevent human-scale tragedy and loss.

Marvel has taken a different route, where the crises and situations are more super-heroic but the characters and their relationships are more flawed and relatable. Tony Stark is arrogant and self-destructive. Bruce Banner lives in fear of the powers that have made him a hermit and a fugitive. Thor has a dysfunctional family and obligations that he doesn't know if he can live up to. Steve Rogers is an optimist in a cynical world, one where his abilities give him the ability to answer that cynicism- but only to a degree.

More, in the Avengers world, those pieces have been slotted together with incredible care, creating a Jenga-like tower where the impossible, the unlikely, and the human still manage to mesh. Tony is still vulnerable outside of his suit. Thor's mortal allies are suddenly dealing with the attentions of god-like adversaries. The Hulk can't be certain of self-control. The Captain symbolizes the ideals of a country that may fall short of those ideals. New pieces are slotted in, and old ones are slotted out, always with care: today's adversary is the dark elves, the next day's the American military.

What you don't tend to see? Asgardian vampires injected with super-soldier vaccine using Skrull technology led by alternative-earth evil versions of the heroes... Because that's where the business tends to go bugf@#%.

And this is the problem with letting slavish love of comics, particularly older comics, be the guiding light of new media ventures. After fifty, sixty, seventy years of backstory and lore, most of these inter-connected worlds have, indeed, gone bugf@#%. So much so that characters have been resurrected multiple times, rebooted multiple times, re-costumed, re-imagined, given "what ifs" and gaiden stories, different nationalities, races, sexes, sexual orientations, desperately trying to keep enough plates spinning that the shards on the floor don't capture too much attention. The comics aren't the place this has all worked perfectly well in the past; the comics are the place where we've seen how badly everything can go haywire when a hundred different writers with different priorities work on very vaguely the same work for several decades.

Where anything can happen, we stop relating, stop caring. Marvel's recent efforts have paid off in part because they are relatable and understandable to someone who doesn't know the significance of side-character X from issue #36; that scholars of "the lore" might get a moment of glee was a bonus, but not the whole point of the endeavor. There's a difference between creating a deep and interconnected world where everything miraculously seems to fit together and jamming anything and everything from the attic into the box and shaking it, hoping it all eventually falls into place.

So... Fourth-wall sniping "She Hulk"? Out-of-left-field Superman-level power "Sentry"? Blade? "Let's just stick vampires in a show that doesn't acknowledge the existence of precognitives, just because it would be 'fun'...?"

I confess I don't have absolute confidence, even with as much care as they've been taking, that Marvel will keep this delicate balancing act going forever. Offerings like "Ant Man" and "Guardians of the Galaxy" have me slightly concerned that we may be about to see the Jenga game at its tipping point, though I truly hope I'm mistaken.

I'll further admit that Agents of Shield is of increasingly waning interest to me, not because of a lack of Marvel-dom, but because most of the characters behave more like children pretending to be secret agents than actual adults.

But I am reasonably confident that sticking a wish-list of colorful superheroes into the works with no regard for how or whether they might actually fit into a new and perilous media continuity not only is not the answer for re-invigorating AoS, but a good way to accelerate screwing up Marvel's new success six ways from Sunday.

I think Marvel's Ultimate universes spider-woman is more interesting but I'd be happy to see either of them.

VonBrewskie:
Dang Bob. Wish you did the writing for that show. What the hell. You should turn in a draft to them or something. Not sure how that would work hahaha but I mean damn. Those are some good ideas man.

Yeah...and those few lines are actually better ideas than 95% of whats actually been in the show. Who the fuck is doing the writing on that show? And who exactly is their target audience?

Catface Meowmers:

ZZoMBiE13:
But I can't agree about Punisher: War Zone. That movie was so wacky. I don't mind a bit of wacky, especially in a comic book film. But it just seemed so out of place in a Punisher story.

Darth Marsden:
Nope, sorry. Gonna have to violently disagree (geddit) that Punisher: War Zone was anything other than an absolute betrayal of the character and a disgusting waste of everyone's time, effort and money.

You're entitled to your opinions, obviously, but you're a little off base in this case. A lot of the "wacky" stuff in P:WZ was taken directly from the comics, specifically the Ennis/War Journal runs IIRC. Those books get a little weird at points.

But it's definitely not "an absolute betrayal".

Good point. So I'll clarify:

Yes, Punisher did get a bit wacky in the comics. That's why I quit reading them. I thought it was out of place in the books as well.

That's not to say that it's bad, or wrong, or non-canon. Just counter to what I personally want from a Punisher story. I'll happily agree that the "dark age of comics" is better left to the past. I enjoy levity in movies like Avengers and Iron Man and the early Spider-man movies and I think they'd be far worse if they went the dark and brooding route.

I'll just always feel that Frank Castle was right at home in that era though. That's kind of his wheelhouse. At least for me. But hey, if you dig wacky Punisher then more power to you. I unironically enjoy Friday the 13th movies, so I am not one to point fingers. ;)

Actually Hyperion is Marvel's "Superman" analogue, indeed "Squadron Supreme" is pretty much a homage to the Justice League with exaggerated problems. The whole Earth/Paradise/Universe X even referred to Hyperion as his universes "Superman" at one point. They also tried to reboot this whole universe as "Supreme Power" which made things even more obvious while departing from the original version.

Ironically "Gladiator" is another direct Superman analogy. It's widely believed this book:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gladiator_(novel)#Publication_history

Is what DC based Superman off of, so creating a character called "Gladiator" who himself has cosmic abilities, head vision, and most of Supe's tricks (albeit being an Alien soldier) was another zing on DC comics.

I suppose Sentry is arguably another one, but unlike a lot of people I never really got that impression despite all the statements especially once you know the trick/point of him.

I also "get" that a lot of people don't like John Walker/USAgent but part of the entire thing was that despite the original cap taking back the mantle, and his whole "redeemed her" arc he never really "sucked" and kind of represented a counterpoint to the original. Granted some of his best stuff came about as a result of series like "Force Works" which admittedly didn't last. I always got the impression that the problem with Walker was they kind of created a monster that kind of made some uncomfortable points they didn't want to face.

The ironic thing here is that he'd actually be a perfect fit with the cinematic universe of SHIELD and the realities of that universe, as opposed to the one he was created in, so I do tend to agree that done right he'd be a good fit for SHIELD especially given that they de-powered Nick Fury by using the "Ultimate" version. Having "Captain American but without the BS" is pretty much what Nick Fury was all about in the comics in his powered form. Albeit if you DID go this direction, like adding a lot of other super beings, you wind up rendering Ward and Mai more or less obsolete in the context of storylines, and I doubt the actors would appreciate being sidelined. Unless of course they decide to use the same basic idea as USAgent, but instead decide to make Ward the new one as opposed to introducing Walker. That could wind up covering a lot of the same territory without quite the same degree of political baggage that the original storyline covered (whether you love it or hate it).

I'm somewhat ambigious about a lot of the other suggestions for similar reasons, because inserting them in the cast causes the same problems, and even if they aren't turned into regular cast members their very existence would risk turning what the current team does fairly obsolete unless they were powered up a bit.

Someone like "Moon Knight" deserves his own TV series. Spider Woman is a decent choice for a supporting character in most cases, but really the choices they made in SHIELD make something that flashy hard to deal with unless they alter a lot of the central elements first, which applies to a lot of the other characters as well. Besides at this power level if you have someone like "She Hulk" you can pretty much say bye bye to any sense of jeopardy, fights that get her into trouble tend to be the sort of thing where multiple city blocks get wrecked in the process. A bunch of enemy agents with guns and spy gizmos becomes rather laughable unless they stretch credibility and have things work on her that really, really, shouldn't in order to take her out of every scene she should be a factor in, which ultimately raises the question why you even want to introduce a character like that to begin with?

tzimize:

VonBrewskie:
Dang Bob. Wish you did the writing for that show. What the hell. You should turn in a draft to them or something. Not sure how that would work hahaha but I mean damn. Those are some good ideas man.

Yeah...and those few lines are actually better ideas than 95% of whats actually been in the show. Who the fuck is doing the writing on that show? And who exactly is their target audience?

Targets three types of people.

People who can not find their remote to the TV.

People who can't sleep so they need something to bore them to sleep.

People like me who want to see just how bad the train wreck can get before Disney or ABC has to step in.

The Punisher should probably be in one of the Netflix show. Blade on the other hand, I'm conflicted about:
He is kinda a street character (at least in the movies and TV show), but who doesn't want to see Joss Whedon do vampires again (and hopefully go all out with it). Know what? Put Blade in both AoS and a Netflix series.

Kumagawa Misogi:

The last Blade film was a decade ago (wow does not seem that long ago) and they were all 'R' rated while the TV show was 8 years ago and aired on Spike TV.

...

There was a Blade anime in 2012.

Thunderous Cacophony:
Did [Arrow] get better?.

It found itself in the last couple of episodes of the first season. And season 2 has been great. They used a season worth of content for the first 9 episodes, it's insane how fast they are moving with so many characters. Arrow is so good right now you should totally watch it.

Why bother with these heroes? They're all the same super awesome guy (strength, stamina, etc.) over and over with the occasional catsuit boobage. And you know if they adapt them in any way they're going to get rid of the stupid suits, so all that would be left would be another physicall fit person. And a gender bender of Hulk, just because. Drop She-Hulk, they would never be able to pull off the CGI on TV in the first place.

Goliath100:

There was a Blade anime in 2012.

I know, but I don't think it was either popular or well received and it only aired late night in the US I believe.

Strucker's actually showing up in the Avengers sequel and probably Cap 3 played by Thomas Kretschmann. Also no love for Mockingbird or Daisy Johnson?

Thunderous Cacophony:

OT: The Taskmasker would probably work best in their universe with a Batman-style utility belt, carrying small weapons and tools [plus, you could write storylines around trying to prevent him from getting access to footage of the Avengers fighting, which would explain why he isn't armed to the teeth].

why would they need to do that? all he had to gain from that would be caps shields trowing powers(and those are useless without the shield), everybody else has abilities he either can get somewhere else or are superhuman in some way, meaning he couldn't copy them.

what's interesting about taskmaster is that all the new shit he learns overwrites his long term memory and because he didn't know that when he starting using his ability he forgot why he started. which kinda fits in nicely in the show.

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