Is The Grand Budapest Hotel Wes Anderson's Best Film Yet?

Is The Grand Budapest Hotel Wes Anderson's Best Film Yet?

Grand Budapest Hotel might not sell you on Anderson, but if you're already sold, you can't help but enjoy it.

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Could we get Michael Bay and Wes Anderson to switch for a while? Rushmore, Moonrise Kingdom, and even to a certain extent The Royal Tenenbaums were great, but after Life Aquatic, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Darjeeling Limited, I'm bored of seeing the same movie over and over and over.

I'd like to see some of that crass misanthropy from Pain and Gain applied to the dessicating corpses of aristocracy past its prime, and to be entirely frank, some papier-mache transforming robots might be more interesting than the PG-13 CGI garbage we have now. Maybe I'd even care about whatever movie-handsome, goofy lead was nervously plowing supermodels if Anderson got the reins for portraying those relationships.

I always find his movies to be mixed bags. I walk away thinking, I enjoyed that but can't tell you why. I love that Bob describes him a hipster. That works.

I'll have to see this and see if I like it as much as his "Moon Rise Kingdom."

For those who would like a look at what his style is like, an imagining if he did a horror movie:

It may be just me, but I would have rather seen this film reviewed in Escape to the Movies, than Need for Speed.

Just from the written description, it seems more interesting to talk about.

Gorfias:
I'll have to see this and see if I like it as much as his "Moon Rise Kingdom."

It's the kids trying to be adults. This is generally what kids do when they enter puberty; That awkward stage when you're no longer a kid anymore, but you're not an adult yet either. They feel the need to rush into it because of hormones, but they're still thinking like children. The movie displays this very well, with both of them trying to dance sexy and inact in what they think is a physical relationship, all the while being extremely self conscious about it.

It's supposed to be awkward and kinda uncomfortable to watch.

Casual Shinji:

Gorfias:
I'll have to see this and see if I like it as much as his "Moon Rise Kingdom."

It's the kids trying to be adults. This is generally what kids do when they enter puberty; That awkward stage when you're no longer a kid anymore, but you're not an adult yet either. They feel the need to rush into it because of hormones, but they're still thinking like children. The movie displays this very well, with both of them trying to dance sexy and inact in what they think is a physical relationship, all the while being extremely self conscious about it.

It's supposed to be awkward and kinda uncomfortable to watch.

I don't agree. I don't think it is supposed to be awkward and uncomfortable to watch. I think it's supposed to be charming. I was charmed. Then I started thinking these kids really are kids, doing and saying things that are awkward and uncomfortable for them when this sort of thing really happens in private. But this wasn't private, it was film. Public.

Thankfully, I don't think this is meant for pedo types. I just hope Wes hasn't robbed these kids of something that will likely eventually happen for them and turned the private into public while making us complicit for watching.

Gorfias:
I don't agree. I don't think it is supposed to be awkward and uncomfortable to watch. I think it's supposed to be charming. I was charmed. Then I started thinking these kids really are kids, doing and saying things that are awkward and uncomfortable for them when this sort of thing really happens in private. But this wasn't private, it was film. Public.

Thankfully, I don't think this is meant for pedo types. I just hope Wes hasn't robbed these kids of something that will likely eventually happen for them and turned the private into public while making us complicit for watching.

I can see what you're getting at, but I'd wager studios generally have proper a safeguard in place to make sure nothing goes over the line. And that measures are followed to shoot scenes like this way differently then how they appear on screen. I'm sure Hollywood does anyway, being as PC as it is.

Really well written article! It's always a challenge to explain, much less endorse Wes Anderson.

Also, I hereby claim Ruins of Whimsy as my punk-folk band name.

I'm kind of on the fence about Anderson; his work can alternate between joyously brilliant and almost unwatchably self satisfied. I think the hipster phenomenon encapsulated what many find irritating about some of his work, it is meticulously eccentric. Its 'quirk and charm' can feel wholly artificial. A kind of "Look at me! Look at how hilariously clever and quirky i am! Oh so much quirk" It can quickly get a bit much. If some of his movies had a face i would punch them.

Scrumpmonkey:
I'm kind of on the fence about Anderson; his work can alternate between joyously brilliant and almost unwatchably self satisfied. I think the hipster phenomenon encapsulated what many find irritating about some of his work, it is meticulously eccentric. Its 'quirk and charm' can feel wholly artificial. A kind of "Look at me! Look at how hilariously clever and quirky i am! Oh so much quirk" It can quickly get a bit much. If some of his movies had a face i would punch them.

I forget which Zero Punctuation it was, but in it Yahtzee described the game he was talking about and it's creator by waving his hands around and saying "QUIRKYYYYYYYYY!" That's what I think is the level of quirkiness you're describing.
It may have been one of Suda 51's games.

OT: This article's beginning perfectly describes what I've been struggling to pin down as Was Anderson's "style". His and Tim Burton's. Well said, Bob.

Don't do what I do, guys. Don't mistake Paul W. S. Anderson and Wes Anderson.

Of course, no-one knows for sure that the W. S. doesn't stand for WeS... and have you ever seen them in the same room at the same time? Eh? Didn't think so.

Casual Shinji:
I can see what you're getting at, but I'd wager studios generally have proper a safeguard in place to make sure nothing goes over the line. And that measures are followed to shoot scenes like this way differently then how they appear on screen. I'm sure Hollywood does anyway, being as PC as it is.

They are PC. They even note when they take special efforts not to let even animals get hurt. They sometimes don't know where the line is though. Probably the most troubling movie ever was "Pretty Baby". Great film, but has nude scenes with Brooke Shields when she was like, 12 or something. Her own mom was her agent at that time and said something to the effect that if all this messes her kid up, "oh well." Big media has a thing about sexualizing young people. Top models are often in their young teens. (creating unfair expectations of what a 40 year old woman should look like.) Heck, Billy Ray Cyrus was in arguably inappropriate pics with his own kid. He now says he regrets that.

Yet, "Pretty Baby" is a great and fascinating film. As was "Moon Rise Kingdom" which I hope more people see. I can't write I know when a line gets crossed as, while I find these films troubling, I would still recommend them.

Andy of Comix Inc:
Don't do what I do, guys. Don't mistake Paul W. S. Anderson and Wes Anderson.

Of course, no-one knows for sure that the W. S. doesn't stand for WeS... and have you ever seen them in the same room at the same time? Eh? Didn't think so.

Do not forget not to confuse Wes Anderson for Wes Craven too! See the SNL clip in the post at the beginning of this thread. I though it pretty dang funny.

BTW: I confuse all three of these guys: Wes Anderson, Paul W. S. Anderson for Paul Thomas Anderson who is arguably the best director of the three. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000759/?ref_=tt_ov_dr

Smokescreen:
It may be just me, but I would have rather seen this film reviewed in Escape to the Movies, than Need for Speed.

Just from the written description, it seems more interesting to talk about.

I disagree. I think it's better that he talks about more 'artsy' movies on Intermission. That way, we tend to have less people saying: 'I don't get it, so is for hipster douchebags.'

This was actually the first Wes Anderson film I've ever watched, but it is making me want to look up the rest of his work. I loved the visual aesthetic and the characters, it reminded me a little bit of Bunny and the Bull. Any recommendations?

It was (as far as I know), the first Wes Anderson film I've watched and I look forward to his next film. Just from this text it seems like TGBH would have been a better episode of Escape to the Movies than whatever was out in March (I think it came out in March, maybe late February).

 

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