Divergent? More Like "Why-Vergent"

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Divergent? More Like "Why-Vergent"

Divergent adorns its skeleton of "Dystopian YA Sci-Fi" formula with so little in the way of new ideas it makes The Hunger Games look like Cloud Atlas.

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i kinda knew this Movie to me looked Bad.. but your Run down makes it sound far worse then i thought.. it might

Finally, someone actually explains what the hell this movie is about.

The Gentleman:
Finally, someone actually explains what the hell this movie is about.

Thank god I'm not the only one who had no idea what in name of the Golden Throne this movie was about. I had a feeling this movie was going to suck but damn Bob, sounds like you should have gotten some hazard pay for this one.

I remember when I saw this trailer the first time and I thought, "So...Twilight in the future?" And not the good Twilight in the future, with the eye patch and combat mane. Sounds like I was right. Worse, a lot of my friends on Facebook are posting about how amazing this movie was and I just shake my head.

If you guys think this sounds bad, go take a gander at the first episode of the CW's new show "The 100". All teenage idiocy aside they should actually put a "stupid" tax on anything that patently doesn't do any research.

All of these (emphasis: ALL OF THESE) "Me-Too-Not-Twilights" are getting annoying and predictable. They've become the new desperate movie industries' Will Smith blockbuster. Please - PLEASE! - tell me there is nothing after the Divergent series that young girls are reading.

Please?

I was iffy about this one initially because when I read the Divergent blurb,

I keep thinking If this is your system, what could possibly go wrong...

With Hunger Games the system at least sorta make sense on paper

I figured out why the snarky asides sort of rub me up the wrong way. A snarky aside is meant to function partly like a metaphor partly like an in-joke, right? When you say DC's new superhero film is so bad it's making the Green Latern look like a beacon of brilliance, you're giving context for just how bad it is and we're all meant to smile and remember 'yeah Green Lantern was a terrible film'. It gives us that nice feeling of social inclusiveness that we get when we feel like our ideas are in sync with everyone elses.

But when you snarky aside about something that isn't established as terrible it feels like you're breaking a social contact. Instead of getting that feeling of social inclusiveness it feels like someone just brought up politics at a funeral. It's not an environment where we're expecting ideas to be put forth and exchanged so instead it's like the author is trying to sneak it under the table and have a go at you for having a different opinion. And obviously it clearly fails at giving context to.

So it#s annoying when something like the Hunger Games receives these sort of asides. If you want to talk about how you disagree with the way other people think about the Hunger Games you need to write about the Hunger Games. It's like you're saying 'Okay guys, we all agree that left-wing viewpoints are a pile of rubbish, right?'. Can you see how that comes off as a little.. well obnoxious? And it's silly because you're a great writer with really interesting ideas and pretty darn insightful and respectful and yet these little things provoke bad-will in me that your articles completely don't deserve, that I then have to fight down and purposely remind myself that it's just a nonsensical socially conditioned response.

I read the first book; it wasn't groundbreaking or even particularly special (this might be because I'd already aged out of the intended audience and was reading for my sister's sake), but it addressed a lot of the things that Moviebob talks about, so I'm guessing there is serious adaptation decay.

Article
Regardless of heritage, y'see, as soon as children in Generic Dystopia #4,273 reach the age they can engage in Young Adult Sexytimes without squicking out the audience they get a medical test that will determine which caste they're best suited to...

...and then immediately go to an entirely separate ceremony where they can just pick whatever allegiance they want regardless. Um, what? So why even have the first test? If all it does is function as a blunt metaphor for guidance counseling and/or the SATs then why make a big secretive thing out of it instead of just peeing on an applicator or something?

...Her main conundrum is avoiding detection by acing her trials Dauntless-style (read: through punching) rather than by situational multitasking - which is apparently the big important super-power of Divergents even though we've already established that a ton of these people change life-direction in their mid-teens so a varied skill-set shouldn't be remotely surprising to anybody.

The point of the test was that the kids don't often change because of the pressure to conform. Bob doesn't seem pleased with how it turned out on film, but the big themes of the book were conformity, false choices, and the flaws of assigning certain characteristics to people and expecting them to live up to them. For instance, the reason the Nerds are evil is because, according to the way their society is organized, they are supposed to remain scientists and researchers while the Ghandis (who are supposed to be meek and self-sacrificing) run the government. The Nerds (led by the ambitious ones) get fed up with this and decide that their logical rule would be better for society, because they've been assured that they are the smartest people in society by default. Meanwhile, Divergence seems to be a lot more common than the people running the system would have you believe (surprise, their personality test that sorts you into one of five categories is not perfect), but that information is suppressed to ensure the system stays in place. Heavy-handed, yes, but still pretty reasonable as far as sci-fi plots go.

Darnit Moviebob, you're liable for damage to my eyes! You can only roll them so much before you get muscle damage.

Unfortunately for MovieBob, he isn't BookBob.

I pointed this out about Twilight and Hunger Games already. Any time you take a first person novel and place it into a movie (which by default is third person) and you aren't narrating the whole thing, its going to suffer.

I really liked the Hunger Games (novel) and thought that the movie was only mediocre. The problem is that the interesting parts of the books are the thought processes in the characters heads. Their actions are merely a result of those thoughts.

While the book is in no way groundbreaking, it is quite entertaining and well written. I will wait for a home version of the movie though.

PS. The zipline is something the Dauntless do because they exhibit thrill seeking behaviour and zip lining off the tallest building seems exciting. I would do it.

PuckFuppet:
If you guys think this sounds bad, go take a gander at the first episode of the CW's new show "The 100". All teenage idiocy aside they should actually put a "stupid" tax on anything that patently doesn't do any research.

I looked that up on IMDB, and the premise sounds idiotic enough. But what research exactly are they ignoring? I'm guessing anything about genes, nuclear fallout and devastation etc., but if you could elaborate, I'd be pleased.

OT: I dunno, this doesn't seem to have gotten quite the kicking other YA novel adaptations have recently. Jeremy Jahns, Chris Stuckmann and the Schmoes Know all gave it a positive review. Maybe Bob's just more burnt out on this stuff than others.

FoolKiller:
Unfortunately for MovieBob, he isn't BookBob.

I pointed this out about Twilight and Hunger Games already. Any time you take a first person novel and place it into a movie (which by default is third person) and you aren't narrating the whole thing, its going to suffer.

I really liked the Hunger Games (novel) and thought that the movie was only mediocre. The problem is that the interesting parts of the books are the thought processes in the characters heads. Their actions are merely a result of those thoughts.

While the book is in no way groundbreaking, it is quite entertaining and well written. I will wait for a home version of the movie though.

PS. The zipline is something the Dauntless do because they exhibit thrill seeking behaviour and zip lining off the tallest building seems exciting. I would do it.

I'm not sure perspective is the problem. Movies/ TV does not have to be third person by default. just go watch an episode of Scrubs. The entire show is J.D.'s thought process because being inside his head is important for the narrative of the show. If the thoughts inside a characters head are important for the narrative there are ways to convey that. It just might take a little bit more care in scree play writing and acting chops

ITT: Every YA-fiction-book-turned-movie is "Twilight" for some reason.

Yeah ok.

OT: I saw it last night and thought it was decent. Not great, but decent. The movie doesn't get exciting until the third act, when the big debacle finally goes down. They hint at it all throughout the first two, and I remember thinking, "Where's that movie? I want to see that one. I could care less about whether or not Triss passes her final exam I already know she's going to pass."

Clearly she should have just joined the hippie farmer faction then none of this would have happened.

Also the idea that only a handful of people are (gasp) multifaceted and can't be easily fit into one box is stupid.

bartholen:

PuckFuppet:
If you guys think this sounds bad, go take a gander at the first episode of the CW's new show "The 100". All teenage idiocy aside they should actually put a "stupid" tax on anything that patently doesn't do any research.

I looked that up on IMDB, and the premise sounds idiotic enough. But what research exactly are they ignoring? I'm guessing anything about genes, nuclear fallout and devastation etc., but if you could elaborate, I'd be pleased.

All of the research. From charting the effects a nuclear war _might_ have to...

Ok, I'll boil it down to a single point. So they're sending the kids down there to determine if the planet can support a long term recolonisation, if they go down they probably won't be able to get back up and there are certain levels of radiation/survival they are prepared to accept (all infeasibility of their century long survival on a bunch of coupled together space stations aside that isn't an entirely ignorant of the research motivation) and their primary goal is to check the radiation levels on the surface.

So they strap the kids into a reentry vehicle, all 100 in one vehicle (physics is rolling its eyes at this point), and slap an extremely complicated wristband on them that is capable of tracking their health. Wait... they have 100 disposable wristband things that are capable of tracking their health? Surely is just a simple "alive/not alive" thing.

No? It measures and transmits data about heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, body temperature, glucose levels, plasma osmolarity, pulse oximetry and capnography (how?) oh ok... wait why don't you just strap a dosimeter to that?

Never even seems to come up, the people on the station are constantly glued to the screens watching what is going on below in terms of health, actively fighting over whether the deaths are being caused by radiation or if something else is causing it, and no one thinks "Shit, we should have put a dosimeter up in that."?

This is before you start talking about how they sidestepped the coriolis effect with their rotation station and how that wouldn't replicate true g... I can't even man.

"Young Adult Fiction" and the post twilight/hunger games boom of fantasy/dsytopia seems stuck in it's own little vacuum, not realizing that what it is doing is not only played out and redundant but also bankrupt of not only original ideas but can't even appropriate interesting ideas from other places.

A big problem i see is that Anime also has a very sizable genre "Crummy future = your high-school" but with much more visual flair, more eccentric, more human and a better sense of humor. Some of these books are obviously inspired by Japanese teencentirc fiction *cough* Battle royal *cough* but many simply fail to even rip more interesting things off. I doubt many of these 'writers' even have the wherewithal to rip something like Gantz off. Partly because that would require something above the level of PG13 but also because they probably aren't aware of it. The creative malaise that has led to this bland genre is seemingly total. It can't even be interestingly shit.

Well thanks for the rundown MovieBob. We all know exactly what to do with this movie now...

...Which of course is to GO SEE IT IMMEDIATELY!

Seriously, this sounds like the best bad faux-highschool movie since "Bratz". I get the feeling I'm gonna be able to bask in its awesome stupidity for days.

I can't be the only one who sees the irony of a story's themes being about throwing off labelling and social constrictions, but then said story only giving 'the power' to be good a more than one thing to a select, special elite. xD

Scrumpmonkey:
"Young Adult Fiction" and the post twilight/hunger games boom of fantasy/dsytopia seems stuck in it's own little vacuum, not realizing that what it is doing is not only played out and redundant but also bankrupt of not only original ideas but can't even appropriate interesting ideas from other places.

A big problem i see is that Anime also has a very sizable genre "Crummy future = your high-school" but with much more visual flair, more eccentric, more human and a better sense of humor. Some of these books are obviously inspired by Japanese teencentirc fiction *cough* Battle royal *cough* but many simply fail to even rip more interesting things off. I doubt many of these 'writers' even have the wherewithal to rip something like Gantz off. Partly because that would require something above the level of PG13 but also because they probably aren't aware of it. The creative malaise that has led to this bland genre is seemingly total. It can't even be interestingly shit.

The odd thing is that the idea of a dystopia itself is not bad; 1984 is one of my favorite books and has a dystopian future that could easily be adapted for the teenage audience. The issue is that these YA novels seem to only be based on appealing to base teenage experience (discontent, rebellion and the like) and not anything higher like "social order, dichotomy of liberty/security" and the like which was probably what dystopian fiction was originally written for.

If you have to make a dystopian future try what some of Project Itoh has written: perfect health and enforced kindness gone wrong, a world of fear with murder on the rise. Hell, Psycho pass could probably be adapted into a YA novel given what those with high crime coefficients are treated as but no, we have to have the same old "high school dichotomy, and generational discontent". You know what did the themes of Hunger games better: Battle Royale due to its commentary on the generational difference between the old and young as well as the effects of being thrown in a death ring. We don't need another hunger games, another divergent, or another giver: we need YA novels that are willing to introduce tough topics to teenagers.

P.S. what is your opinion on Battle Royale? I can't seem to get a read on how you feel about it from your post.

I remember seeing the trailers for this and thinking "Wow, that looks like it has the exact same premise as the Hunger Games, in fact it just looks like it IS the Hunger Games with a sci-fi coat of paint." So actually I'm surprised by just how many original ideas it does seem to have.

FoolKiller:
Unfortunately for MovieBob, he isn't BookBob.

I pointed this out about Twilight and Hunger Games already. Any time you take a first person novel and place it into a movie (which by default is third person) and you aren't narrating the whole thing, its going to suffer.

I really liked the Hunger Games (novel) and thought that the movie was only mediocre. The problem is that the interesting parts of the books are the thought processes in the characters heads. Their actions are merely a result of those thoughts.

You can have main characters narrate movies, look at Fight Club.

Izanagi009:

The odd thing is that the idea of a dystopia itself is not bad; 1984 is one of my favorite books and has a dystopian future that could easily be adapted for the teenage audience. The issue is that these YA novels seem to only be based on appealing to base teenage experience (discontent, rebellion and the like) and not anything higher like "social order, dichotomy of liberty/security" and the like which was probably what dystopian fiction was originally written for.

If you have to make a dystopian future try what some of Project Itoh has written: perfect health and enforced kindness gone wrong, a world of fear with murder on the rise. Hell, Psycho pass could probably be adapted into a YA novel given what those with high crime coefficients are treated as but no, we have to have the same old "high school dichotomy, and generational discontent". You know what did the themes of Hunger games better: Battle Royale due to its commentary on the generational difference between the old and young as well as the effects of being thrown in a death ring. We don't need another hunger games, another divergent, or another giver: we need YA novels that are willing to introduce tough topics to teenagers.

P.S. what is your opinion on Battle Royale? I can't seem to get a read on how you feel about it from your post.

Battle Royal was so good because it was so direct. "Ever felt like high school was a social engineered pressure cooker where you and your class mates are locked in a competition overseen by the oppressive authority of teachers? Well here is LITERALLY THAT taken to its logical, brutal extreme" It was also very Japanese and came with a ton of flair and most crucially didn't aim to be PG13.

The failure of the current crop of YA novels is complete. Its not just that we need new topics it's that the existing topics are not at all being done well. I think it is difficult to fuck up this genre to the degree most YA novels do. Battle royal again shows us that you don't need a 'chosen one', you don't need too much convoluted bullshit, you don't need to keep pulling things out of your arse and your ideas can be both as subtle and unsubtle as you like, sometimes even at the same time. Despite fountains of blood and a literal interpretation of the life or death feeling of the pressure in the Japanese education system some of the points BA made were actually fairly unspoken. A YA novel feels it has to spell everything out in the least original, most tedious and most PG way possible.

There is also the basic issue which is this; most of the people writing these novels are just awful at it. That's the crux of this. It's not the generic tropes or repetitive motifs and settings that really kills it, its simply that they are made by people who simply have no business writing their own name, never mind a book. In gaming terms it kind of reminds me of current smartphone games; lowest common denominator low effort cash cows to get money out of an audience who has no expectation of quality or even a way to discern it. A genre created not with making something great in mind but interested in fodder for a fickle trend.

Scrumpmonkey:

Izanagi009:

The odd thing is that the idea of a dystopia itself is not bad; 1984 is one of my favorite books and has a dystopian future that could easily be adapted for the teenage audience. The issue is that these YA novels seem to only be based on appealing to base teenage experience (discontent, rebellion and the like) and not anything higher like "social order, dichotomy of liberty/security" and the like which was probably what dystopian fiction was originally written for.

If you have to make a dystopian future try what some of Project Itoh has written: perfect health and enforced kindness gone wrong, a world of fear with murder on the rise. Hell, Psycho pass could probably be adapted into a YA novel given what those with high crime coefficients are treated as but no, we have to have the same old "high school dichotomy, and generational discontent". You know what did the themes of Hunger games better: Battle Royale due to its commentary on the generational difference between the old and young as well as the effects of being thrown in a death ring. We don't need another hunger games, another divergent, or another giver: we need YA novels that are willing to introduce tough topics to teenagers.

P.S. what is your opinion on Battle Royale? I can't seem to get a read on how you feel about it from your post.

Battle Royal was so good because it was so direct. "Ever felt like high school was a social engineered pressure cooker where you and your class mates are locked in a competition overseen by the oppressive authority of teachers? Well here is LITERALLY THAT taken to its logical, brutal extreme" It was also very Japanese and came with a ton of flair and most crucially didn't aim to be PG13.

The failure of the current crop of YA novels is complete. Its not just that we need new topics it's that the existing topics are not at all being done well. I think it is difficult to fuck up this genre to the degree most YA novels do. Battle royal again shows us that you don't need a 'chosen one', you don't need too much convoluted bullshit, you don't need to keep pulling things out of your arse and your ideas can be both as subtle and unsubtle as you like, sometimes even at the same time. Despite fountains of blood and a literal interpretation of the life or death feeling of the pressure in the Japanese education system some of the points BA made were actually fairly unspoken. A YA novel feels it has to spell everything out in the least original, most tedious and most PG way possible.

There is also the basic issue which is this; most of the people writing these novels are just awful at it. That's the crux of this. It's not the generic tropes or repetitive motifs and settings that really kills it, its simply that they are made by people who simply have no business writing their own name, never mind a book. In gaming terms it kind of reminds me of current smartphone games; lowest common denominator low effort cash cows to get money out of an audience who has no expectation of quality or even a way to discern it. A genre created not with making something great in mind but interested in fodder for a fickle trend.

So we basically need people who are not educated in fanfiction but actual classical literature as well as various complex socital topics. In addition, we need the narratives to have more human elements: instead of a chosen one, make it one who enters out of selfish needs and grows or one who is doing it out of family, something more human than a destiny

Edit. I forgot to add that we also need the novels to trust the intelligence of the reader

PuckFuppet:

bartholen:

PuckFuppet:
If you guys think this sounds bad, go take a gander at the first episode of the CW's new show "The 100". All teenage idiocy aside they should actually put a "stupid" tax on anything that patently doesn't do any research.

I looked that up on IMDB, and the premise sounds idiotic enough. But what research exactly are they ignoring? I'm guessing anything about genes, nuclear fallout and devastation etc., but if you could elaborate, I'd be pleased.

All of the research. From charting the effects a nuclear war _might_ have to...

Ok, I'll boil it down to a single point. So they're sending the kids down there to determine if the planet can support a long term recolonisation, if they go down they probably won't be able to get back up and there are certain levels of radiation/survival they are prepared to accept (all infeasibility of their century long survival on a bunch of coupled together space stations aside that isn't an entirely ignorant of the research motivation) and their primary goal is to check the radiation levels on the surface.

So they strap the kids into a reentry vehicle, all 100 in one vehicle (physics is rolling its eyes at this point), and slap an extremely complicated wristband on them that is capable of tracking their health. Wait... they have 100 disposable wristband things that are capable of tracking their health? Surely is just a simple "alive/not alive" thing.

No? It measures and transmits data about heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, body temperature, glucose levels, plasma osmolarity, pulse oximetry and capnography (how?) oh ok... wait why don't you just strap a dosimeter to that?

Never even seems to come up, the people on the station are constantly glued to the screens watching what is going on below in terms of health, actively fighting over whether the deaths are being caused by radiation or if something else is causing it, and no one thinks "Shit, we should have put a dosimeter up in that."?

This is before you start talking about how they sidestepped the coriolis effect with their rotation station and how that wouldn't replicate true g... I can't even man.

wow, this sounds stupid. If they were trying to go for a "the last hope of man is in the hands of it's outcasts" narrative, they seem to have failed just basic scientific research and will probably screw up the character arcs.

For a movie about escaping from conformity, Divergent has a complete lack of interest in veering away from formula.

Shots fired.

Movies-based-on-novels (especially YA, but somewhat in general) are going through a remarkably, painfully dull period. I never thought I'd yearn for the heady days of the first Harry Potter movies...

At least the terrible writing can't come through the move, just the stupid world building and plot.

I had a notion this was clichéd to hell and back, and Bob confirms my suspicions. I also liked how you called it clap-trap and hogwash, too.

Scrumpmonkey:

Izanagi009:

The odd thing is that the idea of a dystopia itself is not bad; 1984 is one of my favorite books and has a dystopian future that could easily be adapted for the teenage audience. The issue is that these YA novels seem to only be based on appealing to base teenage experience (discontent, rebellion and the like) and not anything higher like "social order, dichotomy of liberty/security" and the like which was probably what dystopian fiction was originally written for.

If you have to make a dystopian future try what some of Project Itoh has written: perfect health and enforced kindness gone wrong, a world of fear with murder on the rise. Hell, Psycho pass could probably be adapted into a YA novel given what those with high crime coefficients are treated as but no, we have to have the same old "high school dichotomy, and generational discontent". You know what did the themes of Hunger games better: Battle Royale due to its commentary on the generational difference between the old and young as well as the effects of being thrown in a death ring. We don't need another hunger games, another divergent, or another giver: we need YA novels that are willing to introduce tough topics to teenagers.

P.S. what is your opinion on Battle Royale? I can't seem to get a read on how you feel about it from your post.

Battle Royal was so good because it was so direct. "Ever felt like high school was a social engineered pressure cooker where you and your class mates are locked in a competition overseen by the oppressive authority of teachers? Well here is LITERALLY THAT taken to its logical, brutal extreme" It was also very Japanese and came with a ton of flair and most crucially didn't aim to be PG13.

The failure of the current crop of YA novels is complete. Its not just that we need new topics it's that the existing topics are not at all being done well. I think it is difficult to fuck up this genre to the degree most YA novels do. Battle royal again shows us that you don't need a 'chosen one', you don't need too much convoluted bullshit, you don't need to keep pulling things out of your arse and your ideas can be both as subtle and unsubtle as you like, sometimes even at the same time. Despite fountains of blood and a literal interpretation of the life or death feeling of the pressure in the Japanese education system some of the points BA made were actually fairly unspoken. A YA novel feels it has to spell everything out in the least original, most tedious and most PG way possible.

There is also the basic issue which is this; most of the people writing these novels are just awful at it. That's the crux of this. It's not the generic tropes or repetitive motifs and settings that really kills it, its simply that they are made by people who simply have no business writing their own name, never mind a book. In gaming terms it kind of reminds me of current smartphone games; lowest common denominator low effort cash cows to get money out of an audience who has no expectation of quality or even a way to discern it. A genre created not with making something great in mind but interested in fodder for a fickle trend.

Just out of curiosity, since you seem at least marginally knowledgeable about the subject; is there any YA novels out there you would actually recommend?

Having seen the trailer a few times over the past few months of movie watching, I could tell that this movie just wasn't for me. Not because I could tell that it was just another book-to-movie Twilight cash-in meant for younger audiences, but because the trailer all-but said "We're marketing this to people who have read the book(s), and won't bother even trying to explain the plot, so just zone-out until you see the next green 'appropriate for all audiences' screen". The trailer establishes that she's "divergent", hence the name of the movie, but doesn't really establish anything beyond "that means you need to go into hiding". And then from there the rest of the trailer is shots of her training for what I thought to be some form of rebellion against... I don't know. The trailer just assumes that I had read the book and knew that she joined some police-type group of society. Well, at least now I have a basic idea of what the story is like, and since it's Young Adult, I don't need to see the movies or read the books to know how it'll end.

So basically, then, this is your standard geeks vs jocks story, only this time the paradigm has been shifted so that it can appeal more to the kinds of people you wouldn't expect to be able to finish even one chapter, let-alone the entire book. Seems odd to target the jock demographic with a book that doesn't have pretty pictures as 70% of each page. (I kid, I kid)

Oh c'mon, Bob, tell us how you really feel!

OT: For those saying the book was better, the response is: "Who gives a crap?" If you want to read a book review, go read a book review. It's entirely possible for a movie to be utter bollocks while a movie is spectacular.

It's even possible (though not as likely) for the reverse to happen.

Here's a hint: Just because someone says one is bad doesn't reflect upon you as a person if you happen to like the other.

I liked the premise better in Toward the Terra (Japanese comic from the 70s with a television adaptation from 2007), where the "divergents" had latent psychic powers. The government, which was completely controlled by computers with a rigid AI, would murder any teens who demonstrated such powers. It takes place in outer space, on remote planetary colonies, space stations, and interstellar space craft. Also, the kids got telekinetic powers that enabled (at least some of) them to fly through space and engage in dogfights with star fighters. There was still plenty of angst and post-apocalypse stuff too.

The books were terrible, it would of never became a movie outside the YA dystopian fad that Hunger Games spawned.

So your complaints are "it was made to appeal to it's audience?" See, this is why I just can't take you seriously as a film critic.

Mangod:

Just out of curiosity, since you seem at least marginally knowledgeable about the subject; is there any YA novels out there you would actually recommend?

The "His Dark Materials" (As in the Golden Compass) series is good. It isn't one of the new breed of YA novels but it shares all of the hallmarks of what a YA novel SHOULD be. There are some irritating atheist overtones in some of it (we get it, you don't like god) but overall it is a very well realized universe. Great series of novels for any teenager.

The film was shit but don't let that put you off.

Since when we started to use the terms "Young Adult" for "teenagers"? For me, young adult stands around the 18-25 age demographic because that's what they are: young and adults...

Speaking of Shailene Woodley and "Young Adult movies", I'm hoping that the Fault in our Stars will be like the book and not be a Nicholas Sparks movie.

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