8 Reasons Why Games Workshop Loves You

8 Reasons Why Games Workshop Loves You

Last week, we talked about 8 reasons why that Games Workshop doesn't like us.But this week, we're going to flip it around and talk about 8 reasons why they actually like us, if only a little.

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I had a friend once. His name was Steve (isn't wasn't actually, but I'm not going to use his real name without his permission).

Steve loved him some Warhammer 40,000. He was a Space Wolves player.

One day, Steve saved up enough money, and made friends with the right investors, and decided to open himself up a friendly local gaming store in my town.

He ordered some Warhammer and Warhammer 40K stuff to stock his shop with, and merrily began setting up tables and making terrain so that people could fight in forests, swamps, deserts, and junkyards.

Games Workshop sent him three times what he ordered. I'm not exaggerating; it was exactly three times the quantity of merchandise he wanted to display. He cherry picked the products he wanted to display and tried to return the rest.

Games Workshop would not accept the return. They sent it back to him, and resent him the bill. He tried again. They did it again. By now, many weeks had passed, and they notified him that if he didn't pay for all the product the sent him, they would sue. By the time Steve had finished talking to his lawyer and got his options squared away, he was way past due on the bill.

It would take months for an investigation into Games Workshop about them 'not accepting' the returns to turn up anything. Months Games Workshop would spend suing Steve, because they filed their paperwork first. Steve's case would be ruled on long before he could prove that Games Workshop was full of crap. Because Steve couldn't afford to pay the bill, he would probably lose his house, his car, and any money already set aside for his kids' college funds.

So Steve did what everyone does. He caved. He sold his shop to Games Workshop. Now he works at a Games Workshop outlet that he doesn't own, manage, or have much say in as a business.

Games Workshop literally sucked his dream dry and made it into a vampire. Because they don't trust him to vend their products properly.

Games Workshop loves us dearly. Especially our warm, thick jugulars.

Bayushi_Kouya:
I had a friend once. His name was Steve (isn't wasn't actually, but I'm not going to use his real name without his permission).

Steve loved him some Warhammer 40,000. He was a Space Wolves player.

One day, Steve saved up enough money, and made friends with the right investors, and decided to open himself up a friendly local gaming store in my town.

He ordered some Warhammer and Warhammer 40K stuff to stock his shop with, and merrily began setting up tables and making terrain so that people could fight in forests, swamps, deserts, and junkyards.

Games Workshop sent him three times what he ordered. I'm not exaggerating; it was exactly three times the quantity of merchandise he wanted to display. He cherry picked the products he wanted to display and tried to return the rest.

Games Workshop would not accept the return. They sent it back to him, and resent him the bill. He tried again. They did it again. By now, many weeks had passed, and they notified him that if he didn't pay for all the product the sent him, they would sue. By the time Steve had finished talking to his lawyer and got his options squared away, he was way past due on the bill.

It would take months for an investigation into Games Workshop about them 'not accepting' the returns to turn up anything. Months Games Workshop would spend suing Steve, because they filed their paperwork first. Steve's case would be ruled on long before he could prove that Games Workshop was full of crap. Because Steve couldn't afford to pay the bill, he would probably lose his house, his car, and any money already set aside for his kids' college funds.

So Steve did what everyone does. He caved. He sold his shop to Games Workshop. Now he works at a Games Workshop outlet that he doesn't own, manage, or have much say in as a business.

Games Workshop literally sucked his dream dry and made it into a vampire. Because they don't trust him to vend their products properly.

Games Workshop loves us dearly. Especially our warm, thick jugulars.

These are the sort of business practices they brandish on a regular basis, and why "casual" wargamers never understand that GW DESERVES every iota of outrage leveled at it.

I suppose he could have posted an image of Dark Heresy's Critical Hit Table.... but that would violate copy right.
Just go out and buy it already, the critical hit table alone justifies the cost.
Also anything written by Dan Abnett, the Gaunt's Ghost series is kick ass(though I haven't read the latest ones), also he wrote a book that was the Battle of Britain IN SPACE.

I only got 1/4 the way through the gallery before it was declared outdated.

Can someone lend me $80 so I can buy the update?

I'm sorry, but half of these points feel less like legit points and more like the excuses of a person who's too invested into the hobby to jump brand or call it quits. I mean... Raven Guard? Lions of Chrace? Space Hulk? How are any of these symbols of how much GW loves us? Space Hulk got one limited edition reprint around 2012? 2013? And since then, the game's been allowed to die off again. The Raven Guard are just another Space Marine army, and the Lions of Chrace? Do people think that all Elves except GW ones a tree hugging wimps just because Legolas was played by Orlando Bloom?

I'm sorry, but this list seems even lazier than last weeks list, and that one wasted an entire point saying that the Ultramarines sucked, all while missing the obvious point that the Ultramarine model they used for the image was a Finecast model. Fine. Cast.

Bayushi_Kouya:
I had a friend once. His name was Steve (isn't wasn't actually, but I'm not going to use his real name without his permission).

Steve loved him some Warhammer 40,000. He was a Space Wolves player.

One day, Steve saved up enough money, and made friends with the right investors, and decided to open himself up a friendly local gaming store in my town.

He ordered some Warhammer and Warhammer 40K stuff to stock his shop with, and merrily began setting up tables and making terrain so that people could fight in forests, swamps, deserts, and junkyards.

Games Workshop sent him three times what he ordered. I'm not exaggerating; it was exactly three times the quantity of merchandise he wanted to display. He cherry picked the products he wanted to display and tried to return the rest.

Games Workshop would not accept the return. They sent it back to him, and resent him the bill. He tried again. They did it again. By now, many weeks had passed, and they notified him that if he didn't pay for all the product the sent him, they would sue. By the time Steve had finished talking to his lawyer and got his options squared away, he was way past due on the bill.

It would take months for an investigation into Games Workshop about them 'not accepting' the returns to turn up anything. Months Games Workshop would spend suing Steve, because they filed their paperwork first. Steve's case would be ruled on long before he could prove that Games Workshop was full of crap. Because Steve couldn't afford to pay the bill, he would probably lose his house, his car, and any money already set aside for his kids' college funds.

So Steve did what everyone does. He caved. He sold his shop to Games Workshop. Now he works at a Games Workshop outlet that he doesn't own, manage, or have much say in as a business.

Games Workshop literally sucked his dream dry and made it into a vampire. Because they don't trust him to vend their products properly.

Games Workshop loves us dearly. Especially our warm, thick jugulars.

And this right here, is why Games Workshop deserves to join Rackham at the tabletop gaming graveyard. The sooner, the better.

Go back to the drawing board, rewrite this article, and come back when it's worth reading.

Bayushi_Kouya:
I had a friend once. His name was Steve (isn't wasn't actually, but I'm not going to use his real name without his permission).

Steve loved him some Warhammer 40,000. He was a Space Wolves player.

One day, Steve saved up enough money, and made friends with the right investors, and decided to open himself up a friendly local gaming store in my town.

He ordered some Warhammer and Warhammer 40K stuff to stock his shop with, and merrily began setting up tables and making terrain so that people could fight in forests, swamps, deserts, and junkyards.

Games Workshop sent him three times what he ordered. I'm not exaggerating; it was exactly three times the quantity of merchandise he wanted to display. He cherry picked the products he wanted to display and tried to return the rest.

Games Workshop would not accept the return. They sent it back to him, and resent him the bill. He tried again. They did it again. By now, many weeks had passed, and they notified him that if he didn't pay for all the product the sent him, they would sue. By the time Steve had finished talking to his lawyer and got his options squared away, he was way past due on the bill.

It would take months for an investigation into Games Workshop about them 'not accepting' the returns to turn up anything. Months Games Workshop would spend suing Steve, because they filed their paperwork first. Steve's case would be ruled on long before he could prove that Games Workshop was full of crap. Because Steve couldn't afford to pay the bill, he would probably lose his house, his car, and any money already set aside for his kids' college funds.

So Steve did what everyone does. He caved. He sold his shop to Games Workshop. Now he works at a Games Workshop outlet that he doesn't own, manage, or have much say in as a business.

Games Workshop literally sucked his dream dry and made it into a vampire. Because they don't trust him to vend their products properly.

Games Workshop loves us dearly. Especially our warm, thick jugulars.

This right here.

Games Workship have been brilliantly successful have several extremely popular products and essentially define tabletop gaming, and for some reason they decide to pull bullshit stunts like this? I just don't understand why they feel the need to do things like this.

Then there's their pricing strategy, which is why I ultimately ended up giving up on them.

No, Games Workshop. You do not. And while the courageous men and women still manning the till did foster some sort of warm feelings to your brand, you have done nothing to cultivate it. Today, they work with something else, and I hope their new employers have enough wisdom to value their skills.

I could've kept going, the games were very interesting, and I will not lie. The craftsmanship behind the models and the tools was great. More than enough to charge a bit more than usual for them. But not to the ludicrous degree that you evidently felt neccessary. It was simply not possible for me or anyone I knew that were interested to continue. Even the lad with rather wealthy parents who could afford anything to his heart's content felt the costs too steep.

As an old friend forgotten and spurned, let me say this for your future, anonymous mass that represents Games Workshop. Fo the decent thing and die. Release all those hard working creators held chained within your bowels so that they may make more fantastic things in an enviroment that fosters more than emotionless greed and paranoia.

You do not love me. It is impossible for you to do so, for I can't produce the only thing you ever cared for; fresh 20 bank notes.

Bayushi_Kouya:
I had a friend once. His name was Steve (isn't wasn't actually, but I'm not going to use his real name without his permission).

Steve loved him some Warhammer 40,000. He was a Space Wolves player.

One day, Steve saved up enough money, and made friends with the right investors, and decided to open himself up a friendly local gaming store in my town.

He ordered some Warhammer and Warhammer 40K stuff to stock his shop with, and merrily began setting up tables and making terrain so that people could fight in forests, swamps, deserts, and junkyards.

Games Workshop sent him three times what he ordered. I'm not exaggerating; it was exactly three times the quantity of merchandise he wanted to display. He cherry picked the products he wanted to display and tried to return the rest.

Games Workshop would not accept the return. They sent it back to him, and resent him the bill. He tried again. They did it again. By now, many weeks had passed, and they notified him that if he didn't pay for all the product the sent him, they would sue. By the time Steve had finished talking to his lawyer and got his options squared away, he was way past due on the bill.

It would take months for an investigation into Games Workshop about them 'not accepting' the returns to turn up anything. Months Games Workshop would spend suing Steve, because they filed their paperwork first. Steve's case would be ruled on long before he could prove that Games Workshop was full of crap. Because Steve couldn't afford to pay the bill, he would probably lose his house, his car, and any money already set aside for his kids' college funds.

So Steve did what everyone does. He caved. He sold his shop to Games Workshop. Now he works at a Games Workshop outlet that he doesn't own, manage, or have much say in as a business.

Games Workshop literally sucked his dream dry and made it into a vampire. Because they don't trust him to vend their products properly.

Games Workshop loves us dearly. Especially our warm, thick jugulars.

I blame that countries legislation as much as anything else, if he was to scared to let it go to court and get it resolved something was wrong (most likely with this anecdote). If he hadn't ordered all the stock and had made every effort to return the excess the shop owner should have been fine, it sounds to me more like he ordered more than he could sell and couldn't afford it. I am not accusing you of lying, its your friend trying to save face for mistakes he made.

 

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