Game of Thrones Season 4 Ep 3 Review "Breaker of Chains" - Rape & Betrayal

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Game of Thrones Season 4 Ep 3 Review "Breaker of Chains" - Rape & Betrayal

Just when you thought the show was maybe telling a more well-crafted story than the books my George R. R. Martin, it screws something up.

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Perhaps the makers of GoT are relying on the trope that rape will make a person better. With Daenerys, she was introduced as meek and timid. Then after a few rounds of apparent non-consensual sex, she finally stands up to her brother and becomes a strong, heroic woman. Perhaps George Martin didn't like how he originally wrote it, and decided to change/correct it with the t.v series?

In the book, Jamie and Cersei, my impression was that they were falling in to old patterns and that Jamie's change in to a better person might have taken too long to convey over a short ep season approach in GoT, so they condensed it (as they always do), the shorter version gets you to the same destination, but not as long.

While I'm not going to disagree with the way the scene in question is described (I was quite frankly disturbed while watching it too), I do think there's a little too much "but it's not like in the books!" in this recap/review. Maybe Jamie's character arc is different in the television show than in the books, and maybe the chronology is different. Those may well be facts (well, the chronology aspect is definitely a fact) but that doesn't make them somehow inherently wrong.

Personally, I'm curious to see what they choose to do next. Jamie was clearly becoming a heroic (or at least likable) character and his rape of Cersei absolutely should change that. I'm not sure there is anything they could do at this point to turn things around for me. I certainly can't think of anything off hand and, really, that actually excites me. I know what happens in the books to this point and it frankly would be a little boring if it was a carbon copy of what happened there.

At the end of the day, is the turn for Jamie a positive one or negative one for the story at large? I really don't know, but I think it's a little early to say that the scene was totally out of place/character or only included for shock value.

I just have 3 questions.

1: what was the director was trying to depict here? (I've read interviews suggesting it was meant to be rape and others suggesting it wasn't.)

2: If he really was trying to depict rape, what are they doing with Jaime's character? I haven't read the book and I'm not one of those babies who thinks you should never depict rape in TV or film, but from what I've heard this is a big departure from the books and it was really unexpected considering Jaime's recent development. The fact that they changed something that big worries me a bit, but if they manage to pull off whatever they're doing with Jaime, this scene will pay off in the long run

3: If he was trying to keep it true to the books, how did he screw up so bad? The people behind Game of Thrones are clearly very talented and I find it hard to believe they watched this scene before this aired and DIDN'T think it was too rape-y. I really doubt they were trying to depict consensual sex

Also, the title of this article kind of sucks. Nothing about that scene suggested to me that what was happening was ok on any level. I hate how people can watch 3 seasons of a show loaded with horrible events, but as soon as someone gets raped they automatically get on their high-horses and act as though it was presented as a good thing. That said, if they just write this off in the next few episodes and act as though Jaime is still firmly on the same path as before this, I can see why people will be offended

ajapam:
I just have 3 questions.

1: what was the director was trying to depict here? (I've read interviews suggesting it was meant to be rape and others suggesting it wasn't.)

2: If he really was trying to depict rape, what are they doing with Jaime's character? I haven't read the book and I'm not one of those babies who thinks you should never depict rape in TV or film, but from what I've heard this is a big departure from the books and it was really unexpected considering Jaime's recent development. The fact that they changed something that big worries me a bit

3: If he was trying to keep it true to the books, how did he screw up so bad? The people behind Game of Thrones are clearly very talented and I find it hard to believe they watched this scene before this aired and DIDN'T think it was too rape-y. I really doubt they were trying to depict consensual sex

Also, the title of this article kind of sucks. Nothing about that scene suggested to me that what was happening was ok on any level. I hate how people can watch 3 seasons of a show loaded with horrible events, but as soon as someone gets raped they automatically get on their high-horses and act as though it was presented as a good thing.

The problem is that Jaime doesn't rape her in the books. Cersei objects to the location being the Sept of Baelor, and doesn't want to at first, but SPECIFICALLY says "yes, take me now, you're home". She never says that in the episode.

And it ruins Jaime's character on the show. Rape is something that you give a character who you want the audience to absolutely fucking HATE with all of their being. Ramsey Bolton is a good example. But this just made Jaime back into being a total asshole, when in the books he starts to become better after getting back to King's Landing.

snowfi6916:

ajapam:
I just have 3 questions.

1: what was the director was trying to depict here? (I've read interviews suggesting it was meant to be rape and others suggesting it wasn't.)

2: If he really was trying to depict rape, what are they doing with Jaime's character? I haven't read the book and I'm not one of those babies who thinks you should never depict rape in TV or film, but from what I've heard this is a big departure from the books and it was really unexpected considering Jaime's recent development. The fact that they changed something that big worries me a bit

3: If he was trying to keep it true to the books, how did he screw up so bad? The people behind Game of Thrones are clearly very talented and I find it hard to believe they watched this scene before this aired and DIDN'T think it was too rape-y. I really doubt they were trying to depict consensual sex

Also, the title of this article kind of sucks. Nothing about that scene suggested to me that what was happening was ok on any level. I hate how people can watch 3 seasons of a show loaded with horrible events, but as soon as someone gets raped they automatically get on their high-horses and act as though it was presented as a good thing.

The problem is that Jaime doesn't rape her in the books. Cersei objects to the location being the Sept of Baelor, and doesn't want to at first, but SPECIFICALLY says "yes, take me now, you're home". She never says that in the episode.

And it ruins Jaime's character on the show. Rape is something that you give a character who you want the audience to absolutely fucking HATE with all of their being. Ramsey Bolton is a good example. But this just make Jaime back into being a total asshole, when in the books he starts to become better after getting back to King's Landing.

It seems like you're trying to disagree with me by writing exactly what I wrote in a different way. I know it didn't happen this way in the books. I also know this sort of ruins Jaime's character (at least the way he's been recently) in the show. I'm just willing to give the writers the benefit of the doubt that whichever direction they're taking Jaime in might eventually be worthwhile in it's own way

At least I hope it is. This is the first time in the series I've had serious doubts about any new development

I don't agree with this assessment. It is a bit different than the books, but it rides along side.

Jamie's been gelded. Lost his hand, his abilities, his son and the woman he loves is basically blowing him off as a cripple. He's angry and flat out scared. The last thing he had was Cersei. He desperately wants her back and wants the feeling of utter power and control he used to have. Does no one remember the way he pushed Bran out the window? Did that look like a man that cares about anything but himself?

A lot of people seem to think Jamie redeems himself in the books, but I never saw that. I see it as a really horrible man that lost everything due to his own arrogance and eventually hits just rock bottom. This episode shows that. He never starts to redeem himself until the end of book 5.

And honestly? I felt more creeped about Sansa/ Baelish. Poor girl.

It was pretty cringey and clearly rape, I really hope this isn't a fumbled scene and they are just reworking Jaime's arc a bit but we'll see with the rest of the season

On a side note is it just me or is Tyrion's scar getting less prominent as time goes on?

Yea that scene was just not good. Just cut it off after their talk with them both looking at their dead son. All you need. It did not get the "I need to have sex right now!" from Jaime. It was a Sept-full of awkward that just shouldn't have been bothered with.

Adventurer2626:
Yea that scene was just not good. Just cut it off after their talk with them both looking at their dead son. All you need. It did not get the "I need to have sex right now!" from Jaime. It was a Sept-full of awkward that just shouldn't have been bothered with.

They could have still had the sex scene, but for fuck sake, just have Cersei say that she wants to have sex with Jaime! That's what she does in the fucking book! Why does it need to be a rape scene when it was NEVER a rape scene in the book?

"With one sloppily directed scene, he's gone back to being a villain."

There are no heroes in Game of Thrones, nor are there villains. It would be too simple for Jaime to become a heroic knight. Too simple, and too cliched. The heroic knight is a concept the massess can relate to, which is why we crave it; but the Game of Thrones doesn't care about cliches.

Jaime has a monstrous side to him, an arrogant and perverted side. And this scene was reminding us not to get too comfortable with him as a "nice guy".

Alot of people seem to be using the fact that Cersei speaks consent in the books as the reason for why the more explicit rape happens in the show is bad. Cersei in the TV show is simply different than her book counterpart. Two different mediums call for different tellings of the same story, both in dialogue and how things unfold visually. In the show Cersei is done with Jaime, and very bitterly so, making him bereft of the last thing he viewed as his. Their sex in the show is very close to rape, and the book version is less so, and that is an intentional change, a necessary one in my opinion based on the characters as they are in the show.

As far as telling a story goes, there are no boundries or limits, the story demands what it demands, and it being different than what the book's story demanded is no damn reason to view the television's version of the scene as wrong

ninja51:
SNIP

Then explain to me what about the television story "demanded" that this scene be portrayed in this way. 'Cause all I saw was everything we knew about Jaime's character at that point in the show being thrown out in the name of cheap shock value.

I don't care how it compares to the books, I've never read them. What I care about is how it works as a standalone story. This scene was a mistake, period.

Makabriel:
I don't agree with this assessment. It is a bit different than the books, but it rides along side.

Jamie's been gelded. Lost his hand, his abilities, his son and the woman he loves is basically blowing him off as a cripple. He's angry and flat out scared. The last thing he had was Cersei. He desperately wants her back and wants the feeling of utter power and control he used to have. Does no one remember the way he pushed Bran out the window? Did that look like a man that cares about anything but himself?

A lot of people seem to think Jamie redeems himself in the books, but I never saw that. I see it as a really horrible man that lost everything due to his own arrogance and eventually hits just rock bottom. This episode shows that. He never starts to redeem himself until the end of book 5.

your assessment isn't in line with pre-book 1 Jaime, though. The idealistic young man who idolized noble knights and dreamed of being one, who was shaken and traumatized by events he witnessed in his time in the king's guard, including the mad king's rape and abuse of his wife, and who ultimately, and thanklessly, saved the lives of the whole of King's landing.

I agree that fans go a bit overboard in painting him as a noble character, but the counter-movement is equally flawed. He's not the completely unfeeling sociopath the other side of the aisle tries to paint him as, either. My personal interpretation of his arc is that of a man who started out fairly nobly, was spurned by people for his greatest act of heroism, and as a result recoiled into a gilded cage of arrogance, shutting out the entire world, sans his family. From book three on, a series of events occurred that caused his cage to shatter, forcing him to come to terms with who he really is, and his place in the world. As you said, he hit rock bottom. the only direction you can go from there is up.

So yes, in my opinion his redemption arc started there. it's all YMMV, though.

"It was supposed to be a rape that ended up being consensual."

Fuck this guy. Fuck him, fuck him, fuck him. This is not a thing.

Jaime's rape of Cersei isn't about sex (rape seldom is); it's about anger, betrayal, and hatred. Cersei rejected Jaime when things were going well, for incredibly petty reasons. Now her world is shattered, and she wants his love and affection...but only so he'll kill one of the only two other characters for whom he has any feelings at all. That rage, as well as the realization that the woman to whom he's been absolutely loyal and whom he's done terrible things for is a monster, better than Joffrey only in that she does love someone besides herself. This doesn't excuse his actions, but I'm not sure it ruins his character. It reinforces that what has compromised Jaime's honor has been his family: it's one monster's brutal reaction to another monster. That's what the Lanisters bring out in one another. Jaime wanted to be Ser Barristan or Ned Stark, but Cersei and Tywin have made him what he is. Sure, in the show and in the books, he's much improved morally, but he never truly comes out of it. Jaime is still capable of terrible things, as he's always been. He even told Tywin that his "honor was beyond repair." Jaime was never being redeemed: he was simply being made a multi-faceted monster. Something that's at once more realistic than simple redemption, and more frightening than a one-note monster.

Okay. Sorry the rambling response, it's been a long day. My two cents.

I did not like the rape scene, I didn't care for most of this episode, and I don't know how much I can continue to care for this show. But focusing on the Jamie and Cersei scene, why do that? Why bring it into rape territory? Ignoring the fact it might just be a mistake, or mishandling, someone slipped up, I can only think of two possible ideas for Jamie's actions as portrayed.

Jamie returned to King's Landing, wants to see his sister, as he misses her dearly. And she blows him
off, just stone walled, No Jamie GTFO! He's left cold, alone. He get's a new "hand", get's a nice shiny sword, with some insults, get's to train with his left hand, with some more insults, no one gives a shit he's returned...and his son is killed. So fuck it, it's time Jamie got something that Jamie wanted, sis spread your legs the brother train is coming into the tunnel. This seems like a character change, not a slow deliberate change, not something intentional, but a quick sudden jerk the viewer awake sort of change, and I don't know why they would do that. Maybe Jamie was becoming too well liked, admired. NO! Don't you get it, he commits incest! He's EVIL! Look how evil! RAPE!

Or they decided to really change his character, and his and Cersei's relationship, 'cause the only other thing I can really think of is this may be the only time HE (Jamie) could really get Cersei alone, and the rape, well that's just how it's always been, and any time Cersei so much as hinted at having affections for her brother was stockholm talking, and all this time, since they were young Jamie's been raping Cersei, those kids are not just born of incest but also from repeated rape. Cersei never wanted it, and with Jamie being away, for once, finally not constantly raping her, she snapped out of it, she came to her senses, and said no, not any more. But again, why? Why make that particular change? I don't think it makes the story any more compelling, I don't think it lifts any character, all it does is hurt Jamie's character.

I don't mind that changes from the source material happen, sometimes they make for a story I prefer, sometimes they make for their own compelling stories, but this one, it just doesn't feel right.

Darn, I didn't know this had become such a big thing, but I can see how it could.

When I watched the scene, I could tell that the intent of the scene was for her to protest, then get into it, and be conflicted between wanting to be with Jaime and wanting to grieve, and wanting solace and wanting to NOT have sex by their firstborn child's still-fresh corpse, and for it to be twisted and messed up and uncomfortable for everyone involved and everyone watching.

When I watched the scene, I thought it did a poor job of getting that across, but because I'd figured out what it was supposed to be, I just rolled with it and chalked it up to a directing error. I didn't consider at the time what people who didn't figure it out would think, and given how poorly it was brought across, that was probably a fair amount of them.

I got it partly because of knowing the characters and their arcs, and partly because it echoed their scene in the first season, where Cersei initially protests with Jaime, the one where he throws out the quote about killing everyone until he and Cersei are the only ones left in the world.

With all of that, and the uncomfortableness that everyone involved would have with such a scene (even if it'd been done right, it would have been really uncomfortable to watch, much less make), I can see how some of the people might assume that the message would come across and not objectively look to see if it did. Given their higher level of familiarity with their own work, they'd probably have let the echo influence their perception more than it should have - they'd already established for themselves that it was part of Jaime and Cersei's relationship, they just forgot that most folks had forgotten that, and even then, it's a delicate line.

Every now and again, everyone on a production misses the same thing, and it slips through. Hell of an error to have though, but assuming it is one, which I'm fairly certain it is, the show will likely just continue on as if the error hadn't occurred. It's an inconsistency, which happens with TV, and it's got a higher impact because it's on a high-quality, heavily-serialized show with mature content. But if you can go back in your head and edit it down to how it was probably supposed to play out, you can probably continue your viewing unfazed.

Yeah... you're pretty much flat-out remembering the book wrong, man. That whole mini-arc was about Jamie having a compulsive desire to bring things back to the way they used to be and Cersei rejecting him because (dead son regardless) she feels like she's better now that she's in control of everything. It was flat-out rape in the book, too, especially by contrast to how their relationship before she gained control of King's Landing was depicted.

There's... actually quite a bit of rape going on throughout the books, if anything they've toned it down a lot on average. They've almost sliced the thing with Sansa and the Hound out entirely, for instance, which was a huge running indicator of her mental stability (every time she remembered it it became less rapey and more romantic).

The whole arc with Daenerys illustrating her growing power in the Drogo relationship with sexual positions is straight, word-for-word out of the book too.

(I mean, the ENTIRE PLOT of the entire book series spins off of a Targaryan raping a Stark and touching off medieval WW1, that's the only reason the Lannister/Stark thing and Daenerys finding some dragons happened in the first place, rape is quite literally the root cause of EVERYTHING in GoT. What level of chivalry and mutually-respectful relationships are you expecting from this IP, exactly? It's even Rapier than Arthurian legend.)

image
Seriously though, coming from the perspective of a person who hasn't read the books, it made sense to me that the arrogant guy who pushes kids off towers would when given the opportunity to regain some semblance of control over his life take the chance to do so. He did it for the power.

Jim_Callahan:
It's even Rapier than Arthurian legend.

S tier auto correct wit

Martin actually did respond to the "outrage" via his livejournal.

I think the "butterfly effect" that I have spoken of so often was at work here. In the novels, Jaime is not present at Joffrey's death, and indeed, Cersei has been fearful that he is dead himself, that she has lost both the son and the father/ lover/ brother. And then suddenly Jaime is there before her. Maimed and changed, but Jaime nonetheless. Though the time and place is wildly inappropriate and Cersei is fearful of discovery, she is as hungry for him as he is for her.

The whole dynamic is different in the show, where Jaime has been back for weeks at the least, maybe longer, and he and Cersei have been in each other's company on numerous occasions, often quarreling. The setting is the same, but neither character is in the same place as in the books, which may be why Dan & David played the sept out differently. But that's just my surmise; we never discussed this scene, to the best of my recollection.

Also, I was writing the scene from Jaime's POV, so the reader is inside his head, hearing his thoughts. On the TV show, the camera is necessarily external. You don't know what anyone is thinking or feeling, just what they are saying and doing.

If the show had retained some of Cersei's dialogue from the books, it might have left a somewhat different impression -- but that dialogue was very much shaped by the circumstances of the books, delivered by a woman who is seeing her lover again for the first time after a long while apart during which she feared he was dead. I am not sure it would have worked with the new timeline.

That's really all I can say on this issue. The scene was always intended to be disturbing... but I do regret if it has disturbed people for the wrong reasons.

I think the scene makes sense for where Jaime is at right now. Too many people seem to think that he's made this complete transformation to being a good guy now, that his development is over when it's really not. I think if we're going to be outraged at something we should at least give them time to properly contextualize the scene in next week's episode first. We don't know where they're heading with this plotline, so let's see where they take it first.

I'd also like to add that the scene in the books isn't exactly 100% rape free. It's a kind of skeevy disgusting scene, even if Cersei eventually wants it.

Man was that scene really a big deal? It was odd but I don't get why people think Jaimie is a good guy. And rape happens in GoT.. like more times than I can remember. If you can't handle rape in this story maybe it's not for you. But then again I'm thinking people are upset because Jaimie is the rapist and not some sellsword/secondary character.

It's going to be difficult to move on from Jaime's character here without making some very dodgy implications.

I think with this rape (and it is definitely rape) it's going to seem too much like an implication that Cersei makes Jaime act crazy will include she made me rape her.

I don't this is the "ruined forever" moment that a bizarrely large number of people are treating it as however it will cause difficulties in Jaime's development as a character.

My memory isn't the best, I'll admit, but I do want to say while this scene in particular is different in the books, as starts with it being non-consensual and then rolls into consensual (more on that in a second), Jaime does several times after Joffery's death seriously consider doing exactly what happened in the episode. Cersi continues to grow colder and more distant to him, and there is a part of him that seems to think that maybe if he could have her again things would be more the way they used to be. After later developments, he leaves King's Landing before his relationship with his sister/lover can get any worse.

Based on the Jaime's character arc in the books, I'm very curious about where they're going to take him in the show as it really does make it hard for the audience to root for him ever again after this, regardless of your opinion of Cersi.

But I think in way this episode and the rape itself brings up another issue. Both this particular encounter, which in the books begins with Cersi saying "No, not here" (which is still a 'No' folks) and then changing her mind, and Dany's first night with her new husband Khal Drogo (which also starts a 'No' from her that becomes a 'Yes') does present a problem. How uncomfortable would many people in the audience be with these scenes that START as a rape and then move to consensual sex? Isn't that going to make people MORE uncomfortable? Or am I the only one that thinks that, even if that's what happens in the source material?

It's a very significant departure, I have to agree.

What I can't quite understand is why the major departures in how the show depicts Stannis didn't garner the same attention (outside of dedicated forums). Stannis' depiction has been strikingly different, in both seasons 3 and 4, so far.

I'm basically erasing this scene from my mind and going with the book version. At least this time I can attribute it to bad direction and not Jaime being an actual horrible person.

Nope. The raping of Cersei will make her story arc a bit more sensible. Just you wait and see.

"Breaker of Chains" is an appropriate title for this episode and sums up how I see/feel about this whole Jamie rape thing.

This rape was not about Jamie's morality at all, I expect he will still be the slightly morally better version of Jamie he has been becoming and continue on that way.

This was all about control, Jamie has been slowly taking control of his own life back from everyone else ever since he lost his hand (because he has been complete puppet his entire life up until now).

Cersei has been in control of Jamie since puberty (via sex), she is the only woman he has ever slept with and he has only ever slept with her when she wanted to/on her terms, and as such he has had to stay on her good side his eniter life and do whatever she wanted.

She was the one who made him join the kings guard in the first place, under the Mad King, the reason she did that was because she believed she was going to marry the Mad King and she figured that was a way for them to be together, but like most of Cersei's plans that ended up not happening and then Jamie was left alone as the Mad King's bodyguard.

And that is probably the biggest single thing that fucked Jamie up. The Mad King did lots and lots of very fucked up things like every day, he was Joffery x100. And Jamie was there for all of it.

But with this scene Jamie finally takes his control back from Cersei, he finally breaks the chains of her vagina and has his way with her for once.

Cersei is not a victim of Jamie, Cersei is a victim of Cersei, as she is her entire life. She does fucked up shit she thinks is clever and then it all blows up in her face.

IMO this is a step forward in character development for Jamie, this gives him his control back and will not effect his morality at all.

I am going with Tito on this. If the episode's theme was about assholes, why not make both the twins assholes by playing out like in the book where stress relieve is a desecration of the sanctity of the dead, family and a holy place.

Meh, I think he is also right about the producers trolling us.

Smiley Face:
Darn, I didn't know this had become such a big thing, but I can see how it could.

When I watched the scene, I could tell that the intent of the scene was for her to protest, then get into it, and be conflicted between wanting to be with Jaime and wanting to grieve, and wanting solace and wanting to NOT have sex by their firstborn child's still-fresh corpse, and for it to be twisted and messed up and uncomfortable for everyone involved and everyone watching.

When I watched the scene, I thought it did a poor job of getting that across, but because I'd figured out what it was supposed to be, I just rolled with it and chalked it up to a directing error. I didn't consider at the time what people who didn't figure it out would think, and given how poorly it was brought across, that was probably a fair amount of them.

*snip*

I agree with this sentiment.

Maybe it's a bit of a stretch to pull in a scene from a different show but,


Here, like Smiley Face posits, Cersei clearly needed comfort, one way or the other, and Jaime was a tad too enthusiastic about reuniting physically with her after such a long period. All that scene did for me was reaffirm that he does actually love his sister and wants to be with her, no matter what.

Killing people is wrong yet we see that often enough in tv and movies.

Saying the word "fuck" is wrong in programs for children.

Having sex with under 18 is wrong in some countries yet in japan it's legal for 16 and above.

Rights and wrong is relative and a human construct, in the world of game of thrones rape is like having lunch. If you're going to discuss a fantasy world you should leave your own morals out of it.

Personally I think not being a gentleman and not opening a door for a lady is wrong but I have no problem with rape, torture or killing tv, movies and books weather it's adult OR children, it's just fantasies. Even is someone raped Tyrion, so what? it's just a story.

"Well, it becomes consensual by the end, because anything for them ultimately results in a turn-on, especially a power struggle,"

That was my impression, that it ultimately became consentual. Maybe I saw a differently edited version, but I recall her eventually stopping protesting and more moaning?

"I'm not really sure what's going to be the pay off there"
They get an action scene and stop information about their low numbers from falling into enemy hands. Made a lot of sense to me.

"She starts delivering a stirring speech, which you at first believe is being delivered to the rulers of the city"
I don't. Didn't you see all of the shots of the slaves being EVERYWHERE on the wall?
Anyway, it made for a great ending, that's for sure! :)

[REDACTED]:

ninja51:
SNIP

Then explain to me what about the television story "demanded" that this scene be portrayed in this way. 'Cause all I saw was everything we knew about Jaime's character at that point in the show being thrown out in the name of cheap shock value.

I don't care how it compares to the books, I've never read them. What I care about is how it works as a standalone story. This scene was a mistake, period.

Well that's just like... your opinion man.

As some other posts below my original explain, Jaime's madly and creepily in love with Cersei. He pushed Bran out of a window while fucking her. That past, that memory, and that creepy love for Cersei didn't disappear when he had his adventures with Brienne. So when he comes back to King's Landing, finding the only person he's loved or even had sex with as far as we know rejecting him coldly and bitterly, his character loses his last hold on who he was before, handsome fearsome powerful Jaime Lannister. He's becoming a good guy, but it seems you believe that is a simple transition. He's learning how fucked the people in his past are, but at the same time he's pretty fucked up himself still. He snapped, and considering that deep character analysis is what I got from the scene, I'd say it was anything but a mistake.

Between this and Ground Zeroes has this become international nerd culture rap rape week?

I agree the way it was staged was uncomfortable and unnecessary but from the books it was always a little dicey, maybe it's just the way i read it. It is at odds with how we've been seeing in Jamie's somewhat redemption arc.

Having not read the books I thought it was honestly meant to be a rape scene. Learning now that it wasn't meant to is making me wonder what the hell the director was thinking.

I get there have been changes and honestly this could have been done so different.

Picture this.

Jamie and Cersei are in the sept the scene is going as it was. They kiss, Cersei pulls away and says no. Jamie grabs her skirt, Cersei again says no and slaps him. Jamie takes a step back. Cersei's face then changes for a brief instant to an evil smirk / wicked smile she then says "Maybe it is time Jamie" and she lifts up her skirt.

They embrace passionately and fall to the floor as the make love. Then Cersei look up and the camera and again gives that evil grin to the camera and quick cut to Brienne of tarth doing something , maybe hunting for Sansa or something.

What this would do is actually really play on what we've seen of Cersei so far. She always wants to be the top woman and wants to feel she holds the power. This plays off what was suggested in the last episode about Brienne of tarth being attracted to Jamie. Cersei is not having sex with him out of love now but simply to spite Brienne of tarth and to prove she is on top and superior.

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