Jimquisition: The Trap Of Gamer Gratitude

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The Trap Of Gamer Gratitude

When a publisher fixes a problem, think twice before you say thanks.

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There was an unusual calmness in this episode, perhaps to give the message that you shouldn't fall for little tricks, maybe perhaps depends?

Was the last part a reference to something? It sounds so familiar, yet it seems like I've never heard it before.

I like to think of these DLC whose whole purpose is saving time as being active wealth redistribution from people who have more money than time. It's not exactly Robin Hood taking from the rich and giving to the poor, but hey, at least game developers are straightforward about how they weasel their art grants out of millionaires.

As for Joe Average, we earn our unlocks the hard way, via the in-game reward earning system, because theoretically we've got more time than money... and if the game locks too much of its entertainment potential behind too much grinding, we play something else, and the game just stagnates without its audience.

No Jim, you're wrong. These people ARE fucking stupid. And this is why I don't have any faith in consumers.

Jim doing a littlefinger impression. Bigfinger?

Was that an ...Irish accent? I know Aidan Gillen is Irish, but I never thought Petyr Baelish used an accent like... that.

Transdude1996:
Was the last part a reference to something? It sounds so familiar, yet it seems like I've never heard it before.

Game of Thrones specifically, but it's invoking the larger trope of "you can't trust someone who warns you not to trust anyone, because they'll turn on you."

Jim's saying all corporations and stuff are going to watch out for themselves, and he's not wrong. He also says you can trust him, because he's your friend... but that's being done tongue-in-cheek, because he (and The Escapist), of course, wants your views and page clicks.

The difference between Jim and the Garden Warfare stuff is that Jim is trying to attract your views and page clicks by consistently producing excellent, well reasoned, and impeccably argued concepts. EA is designing games that are a pain in the ass to play in order to trick you into spending money on them.

Even worse is the idea that we should want to decrease the amount of time we spend playing a game we paid for. Shouldn't we instead buy missions, map packs etc that increase our playing time? More money = more hours of fun?

I actually thought Jim was doing a pirate impression towards the end. It didn't occur to me that it was supposed to be Littlefinger until the mention of "Sansa".

As for the episode itself, I just want to say one thing about what Jim said at the beginning: it's nice that Sony responded to your video, but as far as improvements to the Vita and its services goes it's just another case of "I'll believe it when I see it." for me.

They don't deserve your gratitude. You don't give them money to thank them. They should be thanking you for buying their products. They should be grateful every time you shell out some of your hard-earned cash to play their game. They don't own you. They don't give you pennies from heaven. They're here to do a job, and you're the one that ultimately decides if they deserve a payday. If a game is shit, you let them know. If they fix it, you tell them "and don't let it happen again." Don't be their bitch. They're YOUR bitch. They bark at your command because you have the money to offer. Thank god for Jim.

EA doing what it can to stay financially afloat in a mire of bad publicity they just can't seem to get out of. I still wonder what will happen if and when they finally sink like THQ and people have game libraries trapped on Origin.

At least we got some good news this week, that is Sony is listening and willing to do what ir can to make things better.

Transdude1996:
Was the last part a reference to something? It sounds so familiar, yet it seems like I've never heard it before.

I think it's something to do with Dungeons & Dragons and/or Pokémon or some other nerdy shite.

-----
Great show, btw.; I wish I could believe that it was only children (i.e. everyone under the age of 20) that seem to be confused as to publisher-motivation regarding these business practices within the gaming industry (or any industry, for that matter). Unfortunately life has taught me otherwise.....

But, it is not yet time to become cynical. Fair business practices, respect for the consumer and overall common sense still have a chance in this world.

We can still be saved.

We can still win.

If only there was someone to lead the charge. Someone we should thank god for.

Hmmmmmmm........

Thank God for Jim, since I'm beyond exasperated with the freemium market -- all the more when EA again charges for a game upfront then adds freemium content to it. Then again, as Kotaku shows, people find just the best rationalizations for the constant bs publishers and developers love to push. Honestly, the idea of gratitude towards a company just seems so alien, now if the game were 100% free then I'd understand it but, after that, it's a transaction, what reason is their to be so slavishly grateful?

I think this needs to be updated.

It's really dirty to take advantage of other's gullibility for profit.

Brilliant message that more people need to hear. And the closing joke almost made me choke on my tea. Please do the Baelish accent every day of your life. Please.

"Tank God for me!"

Anyone else get a mental image of Jim as some kind of grotesquely-cool cyborg-human-tank deity combination with robot lobster hands, tank treads and laser beams coming out of his eyes?

This is why I gave up part way through pvz 2 and never bothered with warfare. This attitude is plastered all over EA and the mobile market. Sadly it's such old news now it's a 'thanks' or ignored response from many people. Not sure what to do at this point though?

For shame Mike Fahey, for shame.

Sometimes I wonder why so many argue against their own self interest.

I've only found micro transactions worthwhile when they add to the experience, rather then make the experience tolerable. I've always been wary of 'always online' requirements when they're not necessary and if I have the option to not use it, then I'll take it. If the option isn't there, then they'll lose a customer (unless the game's really, really good, in which case they'll get a grumpy customer who still doesn't like their shit, but can tolerate it enough for now (which to be honest is a problem in itself)).

Ok, before anything, I have to give Jim mad props for following up on last weeks episode and mentioning the response he got from Sony. Far too often gamers and video game commentators fall into the trap that the big companies can do no right. Only last week I was told I was a moron for even entertaining the idea that a big companies might have the moral high ground. Not just in that specific instance, but that it was even possible at all. This is not a healthy attitude. It is nice to see someone acknowledge when a company at least appears to be making a good faith effort and not immediately dismiss that out of hand as lies. If we never reward good behavior then companies will never improve and the few good things they do will eventually disappear.

As far as the whole garden warfare thing... whoever wrote that article for kotaku needs to be fired. It is really depressing to see people celebrate the addition of micro transactions.

1.) For the love of god Jim, the shirt and the tie lock worse than ever. Buy a bigger shirt so you are able to close the collar and learn to tie a tie. Or get a cliptie.
2.) Most customers are stupid, thats it. They get what they deserve.
3.) The game looks like a regular FPS that went through germanys censorship for violent games.

A-fuckin'-MEN, Jim!!! I reallllllllly HATE when they do this and some numbskull starts drooling all over them for "fixing it". They made it so it could (and they knew it WOULD) break down often, but hey, this way they can milk you for money and sell you shit you don't really want to pay for. Looking at you with rage still, Diablo III auction house!!!

jdarksun:

Transdude1996:
Was the last part a reference to something? It sounds so familiar, yet it seems like I've never heard it before.

Game of Thrones specifically, but it's invoking the larger trope of "you can't trust someone who warns you not to trust anyone, because they'll turn on you."

Jim's saying all corporations and stuff are going to watch out for themselves, and he's not wrong. He also says you can trust him, because he's your friend... but that's being done tongue-in-cheek, because he (and The Escapist), of course, wants your views and page clicks.

The difference between Jim and the Garden Warfare stuff is that Jim is trying to attract your views and page clicks by consistently producing excellent, well reasoned, and impeccably argued concepts. EA is designing games that are a pain in the ass to play in order to trick you into spending money on them.

Ah...so the final bit was a subtle reference. Kudos, Jim!

It's just too bad we can't come down on developers for pulling this bullcrap. Hell, sometimes we can't even complain about it without them throwing a hissy fit and claiming copyright violation or some other crap so our comments are removed. *sigh* Apparently, the First Amendment doesn't exist if you are a gamer...

This is so true, so very true.
Yet, I've seen it happen countless times.... players being grateful to the developers for fixing game problems.

Heck, sometimes I even stumbled into topics saying "thank you for making this game!!". While I appreciate the enthusiasm, they do not deserve any thank you for making a good videogame. Because it's not like they gave it to you completely free as a gift.

I have very little I disagree with, although did get a bit confused on the topic of creating games with micro-transactions in mind.

I believe that if a title intends to microtrans, especially around core systems, that the game should be free. Delaying the release of that shop and asking for $30 up front is a bit intense. When designing games of a free nature, one must design in a number of ways has to take into consideration at what level a player can choose to pay. I'm usually a loud advocate for free to play games, though I haven't played Garden Warfare, but on these basic ideas alone I feel like they've dropped the ball.

With microtransactions becoming a real, and mostly honest form of getting content, it's sad to say that, in my opinion, consumers need to become more scrutinizing in order for those companies who take advantage to change their tactics. I wish I could believe that Jim's idealization of how a company SHOULD act would be true -- I just don't think the people that run them think in those terms. I've worked at these companies....and what it comes down to is who's doing it best (which is the amount of dollars being generated).

But 'best' can be defined by those people playing. Don't pay for drivel. Pay for an experience -- if there's a free to play out there you think is doing it right, throwing them a few bucks can be the difference between an EA who shoe-horns in shit, and an EA who makes positive experiences with these microtransaction models.

Hey Jim, late is late but to show my appreciation from your add block episode I sent you a little something from Amazon, enjoy :P

Uriel_Hayabusa:
As for the episode itself, I just want to say one thing about what Jim said at the beginning: it's nice that Sony responded to your video, but as far as improvements to the Vita and its services goes it's just another case of "I'll believe it when I see it." for me.

Here here. The subject does play into the main topic Jim brought up, doesn't it? Sony is incredibly sorry for holding back its content and deserves a polite "thank you" for owning up to that. It doesn't deserve, "Praise be Sony, the wise and merciful, for promising to bring to us, mere consumers, the content we all crave."

EA rolls out monetization tactics for a game that has a purchase price. Yes, well played, EA. Your profit-reaping skills are quite effective. But no, you should not be lauded to the skies for employing a sales tactic that everyone saw coming a mile off that you are trying to pass off as a means of empowering the player.

The tactic has been used as a plot point in quite a few movies, the first of which coming to mind is "V for Vendetta". Create a problem, make sure it's one that affects a large population, then become the wonderful hero when you introduce the solution to the problem you created. As publishers have demonstrated, people can even know you are the one that made the problem and they'll still be grateful for providing the solution.

It's sad and it's human. People care more about the end result than how to get to it and if it means we get cheated along the way, so be it.

I resent that, Jim. You can't tell me what I am or am not! I'll have you know I'm practically retarded.

I see Jim's week on YouTube, reviewing Steam Greenlight trailers which feature "walls of shit", has finally had an effect on his professional work too. Brilliant metaphor going on there, Jim.

We reached a point where Publishers just became outright disgusting. Most of the people seem so forget about problems so they can become status quo, if the steps the games industry is going are just small enough to provoce no xbox one reaction.
So what is next, do we have to pay for a patch, or per hour of play time? Thank god for jim and other critics that save from buying games like that

Come on, even Sansa is way smarter than the average gamer...

Good episode, btw. But I'm afraid calling out the foolishness, won't fix the fools.

Thank God for Jim for calling out that Kotaku article. It read like a marketing campaign written by someone with absolutely no idea how the product actually works.

canadamus_prime:
No Jim, you're wrong. These people ARE fucking stupid. And this is why I don't have any faith in consumers.

Unfortunately, half of the world's population is below average intelligence. Those are the people that keep companies like EA afloat. They are, after all, 50% of the market.

Colt47:
I still wonder what will happen if and when they finally sink like THQ and people have game libraries trapped on Origin.

Then people will no longer have access to their Origin games.

Valve at least has promised to patch out the DRM if Steam should happen to cease. EA has made no such promise.

Thank God for EA! I mean, for Jim! I mean, my loyalties are split! Who do I trust?

Transdude1996:
Was the last part a reference to something? It sounds so familiar, yet it seems like I've never heard it before.

You don't recognise Hagrid from the Chronicles of Narnia?

canadamus_prime:
No Jim, you're wrong. These people ARE fucking stupid. And this is why I don't have any faith in consumers.

I'm inclined to agree. If the consumer was smart, we wouldn't be here.

lord.jeff:
At least we got some good news this week, that is Sony is listening and willing to do what ir can to make things better.

Unless they're just blowing hot air. While it's nice they talked to Jim, they've claimed support or features "coming" before so I'll wait until I actually see this new indie support.

josh4president:
"Tank God for me!"

Anyone else get a mental image of Jim as some kind of grotesquely-cool cyborg-human-tank deity combination with robot lobster hands, tank treads and laser beams coming out of his eyes?

I just wondered if I'm tanking God, is Jim healer or DPS?

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