8 Words Coined By The Bard

8 Words Coined By The Bard

Today we give you eight words that were coined by William Shakespeare. This man helped formed the English language as we know it today, so let's look at his contribution to your everyday life.

Read Full Article

Many everyday words we take for granted but are owed to one man... Well recorded by one man. Torture is one of his too.

Well, that's a stretch. Weren't many of these words already in use or originated from others? For example "bandit" comes from "banditto" in Latin ("bandido" in Spanish, not "bandito", get it right)
I guess that by "coined" the article means bastardised from other sources.

Triaed:
Well, that's a stretch. Weren't many of these words already in use or originated from others? For example "bandit" comes from "banditto" in Latin ("bandido" in Spanish, not "bandito", get it right)
I guess that by "coined" the article means bastardised from other sources.

Every language is a bastardization of some other source, English especially so; there's no point in fretting about it. Shakespeare genuinely made use of language and has ingrained many words and phrases that we still use today. If you ever find yourself in a pickle, you have one man to thank for it.

Ferisar:

Triaed:
Well, that's a stretch. Weren't many of these words already in use or originated from others? For example "bandit" comes from "banditto" in Latin ("bandido" in Spanish, not "bandito", get it right)
I guess that by "coined" the article means bastardised from other sources.

Every language is a bastardization of some other source, English especially so; there's no point in fretting about it. Shakespeare genuinely made use of language and has ingrained many words and phrases that we still use today. If you ever find yourself in a pickle, you have one man to thank for it.

Correct! All languages borrow from others;so attributing to a single man the invention (coinage) of a certain word seems like a stretch. Thanks for making my point :)

Triaed:

Ferisar:

Triaed:
Well, that's a stretch. Weren't many of these words already in use or originated from others? For example "bandit" comes from "banditto" in Latin ("bandido" in Spanish, not "bandito", get it right)
I guess that by "coined" the article means bastardised from other sources.

Every language is a bastardization of some other source, English especially so; there's no point in fretting about it. Shakespeare genuinely made use of language and has ingrained many words and phrases that we still use today. If you ever find yourself in a pickle, you have one man to thank for it.

Correct! All languages borrow from others;so attributing to a single man the invention (coinage) of a certain word seems like a stretch. Thanks for making my point :)

Given he's an author that is rivaled by something like the bible in popularity that had shewn many (read: really a lot many forever times) phrases and words which have stuck for many a year and had still remained a fairly well known word-smith, yeah, I'd say my point still stands. Words don't spring up in-between languages through telepathy. Someone (generally someone well-known) starts the process. I don't know why Shakespeare somehow doesn't align with that particular thought process for you :P

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here