WWDC Aftermath: Apple Unveils Its Continuous Client, but Is It worth the Cost?

"and soon your phone and Mac computer will be sharing more information than ISPs do with the NSA."
That made me LOL, thanks ;)

And of course locking people in is not going to be seen as a feature by anyone, but a detriment.
And it will serve as a deterrent, too. Apple is shrinking in marketshare for ages now, Android has been long dominant.
And what is Android? Pretty much OPEN, Apple...

They tried this with iTunes and the iPod, remember?

This settles it for me. Apple is a cult, and they really want you abandon your life and join their enclosed compound in Cupertino.

238U

Devin Connors:
WWDC Aftermath: Apple Unveils Its Continuous Client, but Is It worth the Cost?

Is Apple's choice to lock you into iProducts a smart move?

In regards to the lack of a YouTube app on WP8, Microsoft actually made an app (which was actually great and better than the YouTube app on Android at the time in my opinion) because Google still is not interested in supporting the platform, but then Google forced them to take the app off the store (there were certain Google APIs apparently that Microsoft did not have access to so ads weren't served properly apparently; plus, the app allowed you to download YouTube videos for offline viewing which Google most certainly did not like) and now it redirects to the mobile site.

As for iCloud, I agree, when I had an iPhone I never felt compelled to use any of the features because of the fact that I was spread on many different platforms and it was close to useless for me.

Uriel-238:
This settles it for me. Apple is a cult, and they really want you abandon your life and join their enclosed compound in Cupertino.

Yep, pretty much this.

It's Apple. What did you expect? Even after ten years of complaints, itunes(or a third party application/jailbreak) is still the only way to move data from your computer to iCrap, where as almost every other mp3 player, phone or tablet can just plug into a PC's(I'm counting Macs as PCs here) USB port and drag and drop files between the two machines. I had to put a couple picture into my itunes library(did I mention I hated having to install that resource hog, too), just to get a decent background for my pad.[1]

What I like to know is if Apple's top minds think this will rake in the dough or if it will just be another lock in tactic for the few that do use it and another useless bullet point in the ads to impress mac fanbios and potential "turners". Anyone who uses MS Office for work and doesn't own all Apple products will probably just stick with Office's cloud client because they know where everything is(until MS make a new version that moves crap around the ribbon and submenus again), there might be compatibility issues between iWork's MS Office file-types and MS's own Office file-types(hell, older version's of Office might not open files made in a never version correctly), and they may not want to deal with moving files back to a non-Apple computer at work, defeating much of the point of buying into Apple' continuous client network.(How many companies will have $1000 imacs just to runs spreadsheets and word processors when they could get slim desktops or thin clients that run a fraction of the cost?)

Uriel-238:
This settles it for me. Apple is a cult, and they really want you abandon your life and join their enclosed compound in Cupertino.

238U

Dude, most of us on the outside saw Apple turn into a cult within a few years of them bringing Jobs back and him pretty much becoming the Grand Prophet. Just like Scientology, they realized killing their believers was stupid when they could just milk their wallets

[1] It's ironic that even iPads can't do that considering older Macs this Firewire Disk mode thingy that worked similarly between two computers.

Here's the wonderful thing: if you don't want to use iCloud, then don't. Dropbox, OneDrive, etc. will have access to the same document-picker UI as iCloud does in iOS 8. Having iCloud just means that iOS devices will have cloud storage available out of the box.

Also I'm not sure you really get the idea of lock-in. You can get lock-in even on Android; say you've bought a lot of Android apps. Now it's painful to move to, say, Windows Phone, because you won't be able to use your old apps on your new platform. The hand-off features aren't even on that level; if you don't have a Mac and an iPhone, you'll get a user experience about the same as the one with a Mac and iPhone today. It's all additive. If you prefer that such features don't exist at all unless they're also supported across all platforms, you're a crazy person.

Apple's not a cult; they just want to sell you hardware. Google want to sell your eyeballs to advertisers (c.f. them pulling Microsoft's YouTube app being pulled for not showing ads). I know which one I think is creepier.

aiusepsi:
Here's the wonderful thing: if you don't want to use iCloud, then don't. Dropbox, OneDrive, etc. will have access to the same document-picker UI as iCloud does in iOS 8. Having iCloud just means that iOS devices will have cloud storage available out of the box.

Also I'm not sure you really get the idea of lock-in. You can get lock-in even on Android; say you've bought a lot of Android apps. Now it's painful to move to, say, Windows Phone, because you won't be able to use your old apps on your new platform. The hand-off features aren't even on that level; if you don't have a Mac and an iPhone, you'll get a user experience about the same as the one with a Mac and iPhone today. It's all additive. If you prefer that such features don't exist at all unless they're also supported across all platforms, you're a crazy person.

Apple's not a cult; they just want to sell you hardware. Google want to sell your eyeballs to advertisers (c.f. them pulling Microsoft's YouTube app being pulled for not showing ads). I know which one I think is creepier.

Honestly, I don't think you're the one who really gets the idea of lock-in. Being locked-in to a set of hardware isn't about convenience, it's being stuck using the hardware and software in ways the manufacturer tells you to and nothing else. You use what they want, when they want, and how they want. If you buy an apple product, as a normal end-user you can only run the hardware a certain way with only software they approve of, which will only do what they say it can do. It's like how if you have any sort of ipod or iphone, you have to have itunes and even then it won't work as well as it does on a mac compared to pc or linux. Microsoft started going the same direction with windows 8, the newer phones, and the tablets; and the market (especially businesses) punished them severely for it because their platforms, while not exactly open, have never been so rabidly closed off as apple's. It isn't about wanting universal features or being too lazy to switch to a new platform: it's about taking away the option to use another platform at all.

That said, Google is probably the closest the world's ever been to a true bond villain: their obsession with data mining and using analytics to exploit every single individual on the planet is the sort of thing I thought would only ever exist in movies.

This in a nutshell, is why I refuse to use Apple products. The fact that they tend to be more expensive isn't a big deal, but the fact that Apple goes out of it's way to make it's products incompatible with anything that isn't also made by Apple just bothers me to no end.

I don't believe this author is using the phrase lock-in correctly. Nothing about the features announced at WWDC locks you in. Handoff and iCloud are not required lock-in features, they're nice features that you get with more Apple products. It's an experience but an experience can't be lock-in, you only choose if you like that experience or not. It's like saying I like Aerosmith but when I listen to Adel, I don't get that Aerosmith experience. Lock-in would mean that you can't use your data on other platforms or leave all Apple products with your data. You can definitely do that, nothing about Handoff or iCloud will stop you from using that data in other locations or leaving and taking your data with you. The only thing remotely like lock-in is iTunes music (though it's available on Windows as well) and data in some apps that don't support data export but the same is true of some Android apps.

He also fails to mention that iCloud does work on Windows. Windows gets pretty much every iCloud feature Pages, Numbers, and Keynote in iCloud. Windows also gets iCloud Drive.

Does this author honestly expect Apple to make anything for Android ever? It doesn't make sense for Apple. Whether you agree or not, Apple believes that Google has ripped them off with Android; They believe that Eric Schmidt, who was on Apple's BoD when they were creating the iPhone stole from them. I'm not urging whether they're right or not, just stating what Apple believes. Does anyone think Apple has a motivation to make Android apps or services ever? On the other hand, of course Google makes stuff for iOS, thats where all the money is. Apple and Google have very different business models.

 

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