The Best PC I Can Build For Under $750: July 2014

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

The Best PC I Can Build For Under $750: July 2014

Want the best bang for you buck on a summer PC build? Follow our guide.

Read Full Article

Good choices apart from the PSU, Rosewill use Solytech as their go to OEM. Terrible reliability and really dirty, I wouldn't want one in any system I built and for a budget build the risk of killing something inside the PC isnt worth it.

I think if you really wanted to bring the views in you should consider the $450 build. A pretty big conversation is that you can't get a decent PC for the same price as a console. I hear those AMD APUs do a pretty decent job on graphics as well as improve performance of AMD GPUs. With an APU you could even go for the $300 gaming PC build and under-cut the consoles.

J Tyran:
Good choices apart from the PSU, Rosewill use Solytech as their go to OEM. Terrible reliability and really dirty, I wouldn't want one in any system I built and for a budget build the risk of killing something inside the PC isnt worth it.

I just updated the part list. The Rosewill Capstone-450 is now $49.99 on Newegg (after rebate). It's a better unit, comes from a more dependable OEM.

-Devin Connors

Nice build. I too just upgraded my PC this year after about 2 years of saving. I'm sure people will find your article helpful. I found this website very helpful.

http://www.logicalincrements.com/

/r/pcmasterrace on reddit.com has several different builds in the side bar if you want some more options.

Devin Connors:

J Tyran:
Good choices apart from the PSU, Rosewill use Solytech as their go to OEM. Terrible reliability and really dirty, I wouldn't want one in any system I built and for a budget build the risk of killing something inside the PC isnt worth it.

I just updated the part list. The Rosewill Capstone-450 is now $49.99 on Newegg (after rebate). It's a better unit, comes from a more dependable OEM.

-Devin Connors

Power supplies are always a head ache for budget builds, they can be one of the hardest parts to get right.

SSD price is way off, Mushkin Chronos 120gb is showing up as $110: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226236

For budget SSD purposes Sandisk and AData have some great offerings.

120gb SSD seems a bit excessive for a budget PC.

Also I don't like the PSU choice... Its not about going crazy, its about the PSU being the one part of your PC that really shouldn't fuck up, because it will render everything else useless too, sometimes permanently.

Gotta second the Corsair Carbide 200R. I've done 2 builds with that case, and it's quite fantastic for the price. Small, but it can fit decent sized graphics cards, full ATX motherboard, and has plenty of airflow and stuff, while having a nice stylish look.

Weird. A lot of the parts/specs match so closely to the first PC I built. It was kinda uncanny when I scrolled down to find the optical drive was exactly the same one I have right now.

Aaron Sylvester:
SSD price is way off, Mushkin Chronos 120gb is showing up as $110: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226236

For budget SSD purposes Sandisk and AData have some great offerings.

I'm also getting 116 Australian and that would be the strangest mark up ever to only mark us up 6 dollars. (Unless its for shipping reasons) so maybe its lower usually then 110? I don't know.

Thanks for this post. My PC is starting to show it's age, so I've been pondering upgrading. Thankfully, the case should last me a nice long while, so I can keep it for my new system.

Myself, I would skip out on the SSD and put the cash into a slightly better GPU or CPU depending on my needs. That $70 can give a decent performance boost if you use it to get a decent upgrade to the graphics card.

Faster load times are nice but I don't really mind. I'd rather wait a little longer for something that looks better.

I skipped the SSD when building my computer recently. I also went with some used parts, and already had Windows 7..so I didn't have to pay for that. Total cost was $450....and pretty much got the same setup you listed. 6 core, 8 gig of ram, 1 gig nividia gpu, 1 tera hd. It runs every game I have tried on high settings without any slowdown so far....so i'm quite happy with it.....and it was quite cheap.

As far as the used parts....which some people might consider risky. Here is the thing, I saved enough money buying them used, that I could replace 2 of them before I would have lost money. It's been a year now..and have not had to replace any parts at all.

So going used can really save alot of money and seems so far...to be very worth it. I also have room for another GPU in my system.....and since everything else is future proof, I just need to eventually get a new/better GPU if it is ever needed to update my system for future games.

I know you call this "the low end" at $750, but is there the possibility that next month you could look at one that's in the range of what the PS4 / Xbone cost? Just for comparison's sake?

Sadly the best quote I could get for a PC in Australia using most of these parts was closer to $1150 AUD.

SmashLovesTitanQuest:
Also I don't like the PSU choice... Its not about going crazy, its about the PSU being the one part of your PC that really shouldn't fuck up, because it will render everything else useless too, sometimes permanently.

He changed it from a Solytech built one to one thats essentially a re-badged Super Flower Golden Green 450W, JonnyGuru rates that unit pretty highly and you know how strict that site is on PSUs.

so....here's my 2 cents...

Gigabyte Sniper Board - 170
I7-4790 - 315
(Ram) 8Gb Crucial - 70
WD 1tb Black HD (7200 RPM) - 70
Thermaltake 700w power supply - 55

Total: 680 and already leaps and bounds better thanks to the i7 core. Honestly it's also worth saving up just for a gtx 760/770 rather than going with a cheap card. This is all newegg btw in case ppl were wondering. Didn't include a case cause people are picky about that kind of thing.

I love how you sneaked in "blackmail material" with what you'd typically store in you HDD, i mean, you really don't want your blackmail material to go *puff!* should the SSD fail after years' worth of writes.

Mostly looks like a pretty decent budget build (although sadly likely to cost more like 750 over here). Except for this bit:

Devin Connors:
DVD burner... Seems like a no-brainer to include, yeah?

No, not really. What is the point in a DVD burner when a USB stick can hold over 10 times as much while being far more convenient? If you really want an optical drive to keep your catalogue of old games playable, either save a bit by getting just a DVD reader, or spend about the same to get a blu-ray player that isn't already obsolete.

I would skip the SSD. Too costly, too little effect.

shadowstriker86:
so....here's my 2 cents...

Gigabyte Sniper Board - 170
I7-4790 - 315
(Ram) 8Gb Crucial - 70
WD 1tb Black HD (7200 RPM) - 70
Thermaltake 700w power supply - 55

Total: 680 and already leaps and bounds better thanks to the i7 core. Honestly it's also worth saving up just for a gtx 760/770 rather than going with a cheap card. This is all newegg btw in case ppl were wondering. Didn't include a case cause people are picky about that kind of thing.

Well, the i7 for better or worse does not matter. Very few games use CPU power well and those that do do not require a lot of it by default.
Even an i5 from 2nd gen would be OVERKILL for 99% of games. An i7 is just more money spent :(

I also never understand why people go for such PSUs. That too is overkill :(

I may be nitpicking here but this $750 build doesn't include shipping...so it's not really $750. I would skip out on the SSD or get a cheaper one. You don't need 120GB if all you want is a windows install. The saved money could go into faster memory or better GPU. Also skip the optical drive and get a case you like instead of whatever is cheap.

As a little experiment I went and built a similar system on Ibuypower (in fact it was slightly better with a sniper motherboard faster ram and silent liquid cooling and even extras like neon lighting and touch control panel) and with shipping it came out to $825...

And that also includes a copy of Windows 7, mouse, keyboard and a 3 year warranty.

If I take out the Windows 7 it's cheaper then this diy build.

That's why I still don't see the point of diy budget builds. Unless you buy used parts the "savings" you get by doing it yourself are hardly worth the trouble.

I can see building a top end PC yourself. Those parts you can save good money on, but budget builds are easy to get via companies like Ibuypower or whatever others.

I would stay away from any MSI components. MSI has, by far, the greatest warranty incident rate out of any major manufacturer. Yeah, they are a bit cheaper, but you're trading a 5% discount for the potential for major headaches down the line.

Plus they used to be extremely badly designed (wouldn't know nowadays, as I've said, I don't touch MSI). I remember a 1500$ gaming laptop that couldn't run shit because it would overheat to ridiculous levels and the gpu/cpu would pretty much always be under-clocked to deal with the heat issues. The laptop wasn't faulty, either.

Also, I don't see the point of having an SSD on such a system. Faster boot times? Who cares. I'd rather have 20 FPS extra in any game by investing all the SSD money in a better GPU than shaving a few seconds off the load time.

I always goes for kingston memory, intel cpu, nvidia vid card and gigabyte motherboard.

It's not only about power, reliability is also important and those brands never let me down.

Kahani:
What is the point in a DVD burner when a USB stick can hold over 10 times as much while being far more convenient? If you really want an optical drive to keep your catalogue of old games playable, either save a bit by getting just a DVD reader, or spend about the same to get a blu-ray player that isn't already obsolete.

How much is getting a DVD reader going to save over getting a DVD burner when the latter only costs $20? The cheapest blu-ray drive I saw was $50.

vallorn:
Myself, I would skip out on the SSD and put the cash into a slightly better GPU or CPU depending on my needs. That $70 can give a decent performance boost if you use it to get a decent upgrade to the graphics card.

Faster load times are nice but I don't really mind. I'd rather wait a little longer for something that looks better.

I just put an Samsung SSD in my rig and I'm amazed. I used to only put my PC to sleep as it took forever to boot up. Now it flies when booting up, starting apps, shutting down.

OTOH, my older rig now in my exercise room has a GTS250 1 Gig of video ram and I'm amazed how good it can do. Not up with state of the art, but, it will play well enough not to spoil your gaming experience. But looooong loadtimes... so 2012ish!

Devin Connors:
The Best PC I Can Build For Under $750: July 2014

Want the best bang for you buck on a summer PC build? Follow our guide.

Read Full Article

I'd ditch the burner in lieu of getting an external one later on "when needed if ever".

Charcharo:
I would skip the SSD. Too costly, too little effect.

I'd ditch the SSD+HDD combo for a single hybrid drive, like ST2000DX001. Boot times would be marginally worse but it does work pretty well.

I'd pump that money into an intel CPU, eg. 3570k. AMD does not deliver and unlike graphics cards, which can be swapped out easily, the CPU stays.

shadowstriker86:
Well, the i7 for better or worse does not matter. Very few games use CPU power well and those that do do not require a lot of it by default.
Even an i5 from 2nd gen would be OVERKILL for 99% of games. An i7 is just more money spent :(

Planetside 2
Kerbal space program
Dwarf fucking Fortress, yes, the game with the ASCII graphics.

All of those will put any CPU to it's knees. An AMD chip will chug long before a decently overclocked Intel.

3570k is about as good as it goes. The games that would benefit the most from multithreading, ironically, don't use it, or use a naive implementation that slaps locks and pretends it's running parallel. Haswell isn't worth it's weight in manure, unless you're stealing electricity through a wet clothesline or something and have to keep the wattage below a certain level.

i7 is useless for gaming and the only difference it makes is when you're running small, highly-specialized and easily parallelizable algorithms that have been compiled with specific flags and with hyperthreading in mind. Otherwise, hyperthreading increases waste heat and hinders overclocking and is usually turned OFF. A larger cache is nice the same way watercooled RAM is nice - it may make you feel better, but you won't see a difference. The small bump in frequency is irrelevant as you'll be overclocking it manually anyway.

In general, game performance scales with single-threaded performance, not multicore benchmarks.
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/singleThread.html

shadowstriker86:
I also never understand why people go for such PSUs. That too is overkill :(

Stable voltage = longer life of components, stable overclocks = higher overclocks at lower voltages

Decently designed PSU = your PC stands a better chance of surviving in case of SHTF - a loose screw making a short, lightning strike, spilled liquids, etc.

EDIT:

I'd swap the corsair case for something cheaper. Much, much cheaper. As in craigslist "free as long as you pick it up yourself" cheap. PC building is an incremental process. This is how my box used to look:

image

All the money went into the stuff I CAN'T manufacture myself using a dremel and an arc welder. Was a pretty high-end box at the time too. Talk about min-maxing. I eventually replaced the case with a corsair one.

Blackpapa:

Devin Connors:
The Best PC I Can Build For Under $750: July 2014

Want the best bang for you buck on a summer PC build? Follow our guide.

Read Full Article

I'd ditch the burner in lieu of getting an external one later on "when needed if ever".

Charcharo:
I would skip the SSD. Too costly, too little effect.

I'd ditch the SSD+HDD combo for a single hybrid drive, like ST2000DX001. Boot times would be marginally worse but it does work pretty well.

I'd pump that money into an intel CPU, eg. 3570k. AMD does not deliver and unlike graphics cards, which can be swapped out easily, the CPU stays.

shadowstriker86:
Well, the i7 for better or worse does not matter. Very few games use CPU power well and those that do do not require a lot of it by default.
Even an i5 from 2nd gen would be OVERKILL for 99% of games. An i7 is just more money spent :(

Planetside 2
Kerbal space program
Dwarf fucking Fortress, yes, the game with the ASCII graphics.

All of those will put any CPU to it's knees. An AMD chip will chug long before a decently overclocked Intel.

3570k is about as good as it goes. The games that would benefit the most from multithreading, ironically, don't use it, or use a naive implementation that slaps locks and pretends it's running parallel. Haswell isn't worth it's weight in manure, unless you're stealing electricity through a wet clothesline or something and have to keep the wattage below a certain level.

i7 is useless for gaming and the only difference it makes is when you're running small, highly-specialized and easily parallelizable algorithms that have been compiled with specific flags and with hyperthreading in mind. Otherwise, hyperthreading increases waste heat and hinders overclocking and is usually turned OFF. A larger cache is nice the same way watercooled RAM is nice - it may make you feel better, but you won't see a difference. The small bump in frequency is irrelevant as you'll be overclocking it manually anyway.

In general, game performance scales with single-threaded performance, not multicore benchmarks.
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/singleThread.html

shadowstriker86:
I also never understand why people go for such PSUs. That too is overkill :(

Stable voltage = longer life of components, stable overclocks = higher overclocks at lower voltages

Decently designed PSU = your PC stands a better chance of surviving in case of SHTF - a loose screw making a short, lightning strike, spilled liquids, etc.

For some reason you quoted shadowstriker :P too :D

Well, I would rather just get a HDD. I am quite cheap :P ...

I have to admit I do not play any of those games except Dwarf Fortress (and not much). It runs absolutely fine on an i5 750 CPU.
Depends on the AMD CPU. I do not have any PC with AMD CPUs, however I do see that in Benchmakrd they perform well for their price range. That is all that counts, price range and performance for me. I dont even think AMD has an answer to powerful i7 CPUs though, at least not a comparable in price one. There I agree. Then again, even freacking STALKER (AI to the max and physics intensive), Metro Last Light or BF4 or Crysis 3 seem to make full use of my other PC's i5 3570 .

On PSUs :
I dont know. My 400-450 watt PC with the i5 750 and ATI HD 5770 still chuggs along in year 5 of its creation. Only slight GPU overclocks though.
I use a similar PSU (though newer) for the GTX 760 and i5 3570 PC I built. No problems with it either. There was a formula I used in order to calculate the required and all overhead I will actually need.

Put in a more reputable PSU.

And also; stock AMD cooler for the 6300, adaquete. Cool story (pun intended).

Nah seriously spend $30 on a beefier air solution like the arctic i30 or the Coolermaster 212 evo. It'll make it live longer and do it's job better. I recently dealt with that AMD stock cooler for a friends build and frankly coughing on it will do a better job. There's no need for $100 liquid AIO's unless you want the aesthetic really, but a $30 air cooler could knock a good 30 degrees off.

Kahani:
Mostly looks like a pretty decent budget build (although sadly likely to cost more like 750 over here). Except for this bit:

I doubt it would cost as much as 750. I know the UK is a little more expensive, but my PC is under a grand, and that's with a GTX 780 worth 350. I imagine this build might be around the 500 mark.

Charcharo:
I would skip the SSD. Too costly, too little effect.

shadowstriker86:
so....here's my 2 cents...

Gigabyte Sniper Board - 170
I7-4790 - 315
(Ram) 8Gb Crucial - 70
WD 1tb Black HD (7200 RPM) - 70
Thermaltake 700w power supply - 55

Total: 680 and already leaps and bounds better thanks to the i7 core. Honestly it's also worth saving up just for a gtx 760/770 rather than going with a cheap card. This is all newegg btw in case ppl were wondering. Didn't include a case cause people are picky about that kind of thing.

Well, the i7 for better or worse does not matter. Very few games use CPU power well and those that do do not require a lot of it by default.
Even an i5 from 2nd gen would be OVERKILL for 99% of games. An i7 is just more money spent :(

I also never understand why people go for such PSUs. That too is overkill :(

1) i7 can handle multiple programs better, so for people who want to stream/record gaming/edit gaming footage it's kind of ideal

2) most of the high end gaming cards require a 600w PSU with a 42amp minimum on a 12v rail. So ya. Kind of need that extra power

The 970A-G43 is going to accomplish exactly what it needs to: Boot, run all the chosen hardware, and hopefully stay alive and kicking for three or four years.

Uh, three of four years? Four years??? Am I the only one disturbed by that? I don't think I've ever had a machine fail on me after four years. Seven years, yes, but four?

Never.

Then again, I've only bought pre-builts and never tried demanding games on my PCs.

shadowstriker86:
so....here's my 2 cents...

Gigabyte Sniper Board - 170
I7-4790 - 315
(Ram) 8Gb Crucial - 70
WD 1tb Black HD (7200 RPM) - 70
Thermaltake 700w power supply - 55

Total: 680 and already leaps and bounds better thanks to the i7 core. Honestly it's also worth saving up just for a gtx 760/770 rather than going with a cheap card. This is all newegg btw in case ppl were wondering. Didn't include a case cause people are picky about that kind of thing.

i7 is absolutely shit for gaming m8. Like, there is literally no better way to waste your money when looking for a processor for a gaming PC.

For the exact same price of $750 I was able to buy a machine that had a Gigabyte AM3+ motherboard with the same AMD FX 6300 hex core processor, 16 gigs of 1600 speed ddr3 ram, a 1TB 7200rpm SATA hard drive, 650watt PSU (cant remember brand offhand, not home atm to check), DVD burner drive, and a Radeon R9 280X GPU, with a nice black ATX case with a giant fan on the side panel with blue led lighting and Windows 7 Pro 64bit. I can't fault the article's author, but I feel the area's where I did make sacrifices (SSD) where worth making by comparison. I didn't even have to build it myself.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here