8 Science Fiction Books You Should Have Read By Now

8 Science Fiction Books You Should Have Read By Now

Today we give you eight great science fiction novels that you really should have read by now, you've had more than enough time. We suggest that you get your library card primed and get your reading hat on.

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Foundation? Ender's Game? War of the Worlds? Neuromancer?

Is Animal Farm actually sci-fi?

--Morology!

Ace Morologist:

Is Animal Farm actually sci-fi?

--Morology!

Well it isn't fantasy for one.

I too am a little suprised at the lack of Asimov, but compared to some other lists this isn't that bad.

Ace Morologist:
Foundation? Ender's Game? War of the Worlds? Neuromancer?

Having read all of these except for War of the Worlds, I have to agree.

I've read half of the books on the list and I would have gladly replaced Animal Farm, Fahrenheit 451 or Slaughterhouse 5 with Ender's Game as it's easily my favorite Sci-fi novel, just ahead of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

Couldn't we have cut out one of the Heinlein books for Asimov or Ender's Game?

You know, I would personally recommend Cat's Cradle over Slaughter House 5, just sayin'

Two Heinlein books and neither of them Starship Troopers?

Animal Farm is not sci-fi.

Agreed about Animal Farm not being scifi, I would call it more allegory/fantasy.

Though admitting it is blasphemy, I never really enjoyed reading Heinlen, or Adams...just the writing style I suppose. I am one of those wierdos who preferred Starship Troopers the movie to the books. However, I would also add that I find 2001 an unwatchable film, but find the book imminently compelling.

At any rate, half these books were required reading for me in highschool and early college. Solid choices, if not necessarily my faves of the genre.

Read them all, but I'd replace Animal Farm with one of the books from The Night's Dawn trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton.

Replace Fahrenheit, Slaughterhouse, Stranger in a Strange Land and the allegory tale, with: Starship Troopers, Neuromancer, Forever War and Use of Weapons, and you'd have a list that doesn't seem random.

If you really wanted to put Orwell in there you should've just gone with 1984. Animal Farm isn't sci-fi.
Also it annoys me to no end that you put 2 Heinlein books in there but nothing by Philip K. Dick.

Batou667:
Two Heinlein books and neither of them Starship Troopers?

Animal Farm is not sci-fi.

This, Starship Troopers is one of my favorite books of all time and I feel that was far ahead of it's time. Well despite the fascism...

The Stainless Steel Rat series would have been on this list if I was in charge...

image

But that's none of my business.

What about Dragon's Egg? It is a first contact story about humans meeting the Cheela, a race of beings who live on the surface of a neutron star. Both races live at a different time frame - twenty-nine seconds for a human is the rough equivalent of a year for a Cheela. We get to see an entire civilization pop up before our eyes.

Ah, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress... there ain't no such thing as a free lunch.
I need to read it again. Again.

Once again, the brilliance and awesomeness of the Perfect Dark books is denied. When will people learn?

8/8

Ace Morologist:
Foundation? Ender's Game (Card)? War of the Worlds (Wells)? Neuromancer (Gibson)?

Solid choices. Maybe for part 2 also include Ringworld (Niven), The Diamond Age (or Snow Crash) (Stephenson) and Brave New World (Huxley). Maybe even Watchmen (Moore/Gibbons).

For what it's worth, I would have chosen 1984 over Animal Farm for Orwell as well.

Man in the High Castle? 1984? Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? The Forever War? War of the World? Jam? Brave New World? We?

No Isaac Asimov? "I, Robot" was admittedly slaughtered by Will Smith et al. but the book is terrific and defining in the genre. Works a lot better as short stories too.

I'm not so sure about those Heinlein books, honestly. If you like pulp, his "Starship Troopers" or "Have Spacesuit, Will Travel" are more to the point, in my opinion, and also more relevant to the rest of sci-fi.

"The Dipossessed" by Ursula K. Le Guin would be on my list, as well as David Brin's "Sundiver"-- those two have inspired so very many other authors and is the origin of a whole slew of staples, such as "uplift" and "ansible".

P D James, "Children of Men" is sorely missing. William Gibson, "Neuromancer" like pointed out above, again for defining a genre. Definitely Philip K. Dick, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?"

Also, Jules Verne, "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea". Predicting nuclear power in 1870 was pretty cool. Arguably the first "actual sci-fi" written, in that it is based on scientific ideas rather than fantastical adventure such as in Verne's other works, e.g. "Journey to the Center of the Earth"

PS. If you happen to know Swedish, this one is a MUST read:
George Johansson "Datorernas Död" [Death of the Computers] -- a brilliant cyberpunk classic written for teenagers and published a year before Gibson's Neuromancer

 

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