Outlander Review: Sex, Lies, and Time Travel

Outlander Review: Sex, Lies, and Time Travel

This freshman drama, based on a series of books by Diana Gabaldon, is off to a good start -- but can it keep up the pace?

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This show played a little bit too much like a romance novel - the withdrawn, dour husband that's serious but still willing to give some fillatio when the moment quite literally presents itself, the young, injured soldier who presents a fork in the road,most likely to similarly satisfy Claire's needs, to keep her warm as it were. It's practically a parody unto itself. The contrast between post-WW2 and colonial-era Europe is nice, if only to remind us that at the show's core is a time travel mystery involving witchcraft. I'll give this show 1 more episode to try and hook me. Some promise is there but I can't shake the feeling that Claire is literally reading the book to me.

Remus:
This show played a little bit too much like a romance novel

Mainly because it's a romance novel's adaptation.

Remus:

the withdrawn, dour husband that's serious but still willing to give some fillatio

It's called cunnilingus.

Alterego-X:

Remus:
This show played a little bit too much like a romance novel

Mainly because it's a romance novel's adaptation.

Remus:

the withdrawn, dour husband that's serious but still willing to give some fillatio

It's called cunnilingus.

That explains it! Yea, I definitely won't be watching.

Alterego-X:

Mainly because it's a romance novel's adaptation.

It's not a romance novel, though the first book in the series has a strong romantic plot. The series itself hews closer to historical fiction, what with all the military battles and subterfuge.

Also, for the review itself... Black Jack Randall almost raped Claire because that's his thing. He rapes everyone. Everyone. No, seriously, freakin' everyone.

Not having read the books it'll be interesting to me to see how, if at all, she decides to change the future based on her knowledge of it. Modern medicine (modern as of the early 1900's), steam engines, light bulbs/electricity, etc., etc.

Even if she is not familiar with the engineering principles of those things (probably couldn't manufacture a steam engine or light bulb herself) she could probably explain it to a master crafter or good blacksmith or something and have them make it.

Kuala BangoDango:
Not having read the books it'll be interesting to me to see how, if at all, she decides to change the future based on her knowledge of it. Modern medicine (modern as of the early 1900's), steam engines, light bulbs/electricity, etc., etc.

Even if she is not familiar with the engineering principles of those things (probably couldn't manufacture a steam engine or light bulb herself) she could probably explain it to a master crafter or good blacksmith or something and have them make it.

Trying to do something like that would be a good way to get her labeled crazy or accused of witchcraft.

yeah_so_no:
Trying to do something like that would be a good way to get her labeled crazy or accused of witchcraft.

Though the story takes place a few years after the Witchcraft Act of 1735, so anyone accusing her of witchcraft would be illegal.

Alterego-X:

yeah_so_no:
Trying to do something like that would be a good way to get her labeled crazy or accused of witchcraft.

Though the story takes place a few years after the Witchcraft Act of 1735, so anyone accusing her of witchcraft would be illegal.

Didn't stop it from happening in the book.

 

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