Star Wars: This Is How You Defend The Ridiculous Crossguard Lightsaber

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Star Wars: This Is How You Defend The Ridiculous Crossguard Lightsaber

To anyone saying that the crossguard lightsaber from the Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer is impractical, this is my response.

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All of you've really done is explain something we've known for a long time: that only force users can effectively use lightsabers as weapons. Obviously they have much greater control over their own reflexes (not to mention some pre-cognitive abilities) and thus can not chop off their own limbs.

Of course, it still makes Obi-wan a rather careless or negligent instructor as you pointed out.

4 winged dragons are totally a thing, also no winged dragons. How do they fly? Who the fuck cares, its a dragon. If I see a dragon in real life my first thought wont be "How in the hell do you fly with wings like that?" It'd be "Holy crap, its a dragon! Please be more Dragonheart and less Reign of Fire. Dragonheart, not Reign of Fire.

Same with Lightsabers. I'm not gonna wonder how in the hell they work. I'm gonna be spazzin about how cool it is that they exist and aren't extendin into infinity and murderin people by accident.

That bein said, I prefer Colbert's defense because its both less nerdy and yet more nerdy at the same time.

I just wanted to raise a point, what makes the balance of the sword. It's not really the weight of the grip, pommel and hilt, acting has a counter weight. It's mostly the shape of the blade that has the greatest influence on the balance point. The distal taper of the blade is quite important. A sword like a katana, cut oriented, with little distal taper will be more blade heavy than an Oakeshott type XV which is a cut and thrust but slightly more adapted to the thrust (and half-swording). It's only when you go with really complex hilt, like basket hilt, that the hilt really start to play a bigger role in the balance.

My problem with the light saber in the trailer has nothing to do with it's design. It's the desperate cloying going on.

The architects of this trailer just seem so desperate to try and deliver the sense of excitement from that Darth Maul double bladed lightsaber reveal moment again. It's like the new Beetle from VW, let's repackage this thing that a lot of people liked and sell it back to them in a new package. I don't like pandering in general, but I really dislike it when it's in a Star Wars film.

And this isn't anything new either. Some of the other saber designs that have come along in the years between Darth Maul's reveal and today have been the same level of "PLEASE FEEL AWESOME LIKE THAT MOMENT IN TIME BETWEEN THE HOPE OF PHANTOM MENACE AND THE REALITY OF PHANTOM MENACE... REMEMBER HOW GREAT THAT WAS GUYS??? GUYS??? RIGHT????".

It just seems desperate in a way that I don't think it needs to be. The fact that the added plasma blades are absurd is irrelevant.

But that's just me. I know no one else seems to share this view, and that's fine. Maybe I'm way off base and over thinking it. And I'm still eager to see the movie so it's not like anything was really lost. It's just a brief moment that struck the wrong chord with me.

micuu:
All of you've really done is explain something we've known for a long time: that only force users can effectively use lightsabers as weapons. Obviously they have much greater control over their own reflexes (not to mention some pre-cognitive abilities) and thus can not chop off their own limbs.

Of course, it still makes Obi-wan a rather careless or negligent instructor as you pointed out.

Let's also not forget that in Star Wars it's really not that uncommon to have a robotic prosthesis. Many of the EU stuff also had it set up to where a cyborg limb replacement was pretty common place. For all we know, most Padawan have lost their thumbs long before their silly braid gets tot he shoulder. :D

From a purely Lore perspective there is also the whole "building your own lightsaber" and having it "reflect the nature of the wielder". For most Jedi the differences are slight. They value and instruct restraint and balance. Thus most of their lightsabers follow a traditional and functional design. Siths on the other hand encourage you to wallow in your emotions. So we see various design choices from Count Dookus more elegantly designed lightsaber to Darth Mauls dual-lightsaber. Both reflect the user, with Dooku being a very arrogant fighter, holding his lightsaber much like a conductors baton or a light thrusting weapon and Maul overwhelming his opponent with a flurry of brutal attacks struck in great rage but with total control.
It is however not a purely Sith thing. Look at Mace Windus purple lightsaber and lets not overlook likes own lightsaber. A simple utilitarian design. Add to that the different colors of lightsaber among the Jedi (in the RPGs these denote your class or focus).
So what does that tell us about this new sith? Well a cross-guard is primarily used to protect the users hand, but what options does it give to a highly trained individual? Well unlike the standard style of parry and recover, the crossguard allows him to follow through on his attacks without fear of a few missing fingers. At these situations where the blades are locked, the guard becomes a threat for his opponent. While not likely to be lethal the guard can be use to cut of fingers, injure arms or chest or any part of the enemies. Just slide the blade along the opponents blade and he is in trouble. Another option would be to using immaterial light to catch and hold the opponents blade. A parry and quick twist of the wrist and the opponents blade would be caught between you blade and the guard, making it easier to disarm your opponent. From these possibilities we can tell that the sith would be a tactical fighter. In other situations it is likely that they will choose to personally engage but will use any trick to gain the advantage.

The real problem is that it serves no purpose. Any blow from a lightsaber that a crossguard would stop in a clash between two normal swords will instead slice through the emitters. You could argue that the hilt could be made from cortosis to prevent this, but if you have access to that, it would make more sense just to make the whole crossguard from the stuff.

The problem with the cross-guard lightsaber, from my thinking, is that it highlights a problem lightsabers have always had: if I slide my lightsaber down your lightsaber, I will cut off your hand. We can argue that, like the katanas they're based on, the fighting style employed by lightsabers prevents that from happening, except the prequels have shown us that, given the choice, lightsabers are not used anything like katanas.

That being said, the kind of rapid-swing, choreographed fighting style exhibited in the prequels would prevent me from sliding my lightsaber down yours and cutting off your hand, but that just brings us back to the cross-guard lightsaber:

What possible fighting style could you have where that's effective? Watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hlIUrd7d1Q

They start using the swords at around 1:50. That's the traditional way to hold a sword of that size: one hand on the hilt, one hand on the blade. I'll give you a moment to think about that with a lightsaber.

Clearly, that's not what we're talking about. And, given a lightsaber's weight's going to be all-hilt and not that heavy no matter how long the blade, let's start talking about light, one-handed swords, even if that's clearly not what this sword is patterned on.

It's always seemed to me that lightsabers should be employed as fencing sabers. They're light. They move quickly. They have substantial reach without unbalancing the weapon. But fencing swords must have handguards because, in fencing, without a handguard you lose your hand. Even with a handguard, you're likely to take several hits to the arm before anything else.

So, let's assume this... light-claymore is going to be used like a fencer. I doubt it; I bet that sith swings the sword like he was Ned Stark the gymnast. But let's say he handles it like a fencer. The thing about those little side blades is... it looks like an opponent could just cut through the emitters, rendering them useless.

Oh, they're supposed to be offensive, not defensive? I would like you to think about getting the hilt of a sword close enough to your enemy and 1. you have not already stabbed them or B. they have not already stabbed you.

Now, if the Colbert Defense turns out to be true (which I doubt; I'm fairly certain one of those light-nubs is going to be cut off in a climactic moment), then maybe we have something here. Maybe we had a sith who looked at a lightsaber and said, "No wonder there's so many sith and jedi missing hands," and decided to do something about it. This could turn out to be an interesting weapon.

But I'm pretty sure someone said, "You know what would be badass? Lightsaber cross-guard," and they didn't take it any further than that.

As an aside, what's the limiting factor on the length of a lightsaber? Power? Focusing crystal quality? Because it seems to me, whoever has the longest lightsaber has a clear advantage. If I can stab you when you're fifteen feet away, you'll never get far enough inside my guard to hit me with a traditionally lengthed 'saber. Clearly, we can't do light-polearms (an opponent would just cut through the pole), but if the blade of my saber is twelve feet long, apart from collateral damage (which, who cares), there's not really a downside since the blade is weightless.

I'm going to run with the idea that the "broadsaber" (broadsword + Lightsaber) for lack of a better name, is an ancient Sith relic being wielded by a long presumed dead Sith lord (from maybe as far back as before The Old Republic).

Azuaron:
apart from collateral damage (which, who cares), there's not really a downside since the blade is weightless.

Yes you care about collateral damage, like in a space ship, or close to dangerous matter or even when you fight with people by your side.

Wolyo:

Azuaron:
apart from collateral damage (which, who cares), there's not really a downside since the blade is weightless.

Yes you care about collateral damage, like in a space ship, or close to dangerous matter or even when you fight with people by your side.

Not if you are a Sith! I will throw us all into the vacuum of space! I will spill this carbonate all over the room! I will pelt you with the dismembered limbs of my allies!
because dark side!

Methodia Chicken:

Not if you are a Sith! I will throw us all into the vacuum of space! I will spill this carbonate all over the room! I will pelt you with the dismembered limbs of my allies!
because dark side!

Sith doesn't mean batshit crazy plus you can do all that with a normally sized one.

Kinda don't think your "It's just the force" reasoning makes any sense in this case.

Alright, we can accept the force makes the impractical lightsaber useful to begin with. So all that discussion about weight distribution bears no weight. So look at how the things get used- twirled, spun, waved all over the damn place. What purpose does the crossguard serve, here, other than to make a difficult weapon to use even more difficult? Why would even a force user- who can magically deal with working around the crossguard, in addition to avoiding the blade- further limit themselves by wielding it? It's a weapon- are you just going to assume that you're so much better with the blade you can fight up to a more flexible jedi opponent, who has the same preternatural ability to not eviscerate themselves and a simpler saber?

It does matter how many blades you stick on the thing because it's a tool to be used, occasionally against other people using the same tool, with the same skills. If the crossguard doesn't offer any advantages, you're just adding a stumbling block for yourself. Blame it on Disney's marketing department, or on sith arrogance, but unless they show the crossguard having a real and immediate use to the wielder, it's going to remain a point of ridicule whenever people want to bash Disney's adaptation of the universe, because it's an impractical add-on to a weapon which has had the original absurdity of its nature eclipsed by the functionality jedi have gotten out of it in the films. All they have to do to shut up the detractors give it that same on-screen visible functionality: Make sure it gets used, and well. That's the difference between going in a cool new design direction and throwing a trenchcoat on your characters because you want a prop that suggests badassery.

Wolyo:

Azuaron:
apart from collateral damage (which, who cares), there's not really a downside since the blade is weightless.

Yes you care about collateral damage, like in a space ship, or close to dangerous matter or even when you fight with people by your side.

Yes, that's clearly the most important part of my rant. And easily solved by adjustable blade lengths. So... yeah.

So basically, "a space wizard did it."

Which is fine. I didn't want to bring the real world or practicality into it in the first place.

It still looks dumb.

I think I'm just gonna leave this here...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYlvatkLU0U

Also, lightsabre quillions terrify me. All of a sudden, you're not so worried about locking blades because, with a little change in weight or stance you've taken someone's eye out. Or driven it through their temple. Or into their chest. Or you've got a perfect lever to disarm a foe through good old leverage and muscle. Given that the weilder would be trained to use it effectively, this addition is mind-bogglingly fantastic.

Honestly, I think it comes down to what the claymore lightsaber *is* and who it's owned by.

It looks like... well, a cobbled-together piece of garbage. Which might *work*, in the context of the story. It might be one that's put together with lots of old parts and barely keeping together. The "cross-guards" might actually be some sort of stabilization vents to keep the massive blade together.

I mean, look at that thing. It's flipping huge. Might mean going back to the visual and movement styles of "act like these things weigh 20 points" of the original trilogy instead of the "act like they're weightless" in the prequels.

Don't care for the cross-guard blades. It feels too much like the "add more blades, it will make awesome for reasons!!!OMGWTFBBQ!!!" Which, let's be honest, is stupid reason. Plus, it looks silly.

But what really bothers me about the trailer is how much of what it shows looks like "trailer shots." You know, shots that are only composed that way to have something "neat" to put in the trailer. These kinds of shots almost always stand out as weird in the movies themselves. Both the reveal of the black storm trooper who is, for some reason, very controversial and the appearance of the apparent Sith seem to exist for no reason other than to be in the trailer. I can't, for the life of me, figure out what the context of those scenes is supposed to be. And to boot, both of those are seem weirdly framed to me. I'm not an expert in cinematography so I can't describe it in technical terms (or even quite put my finger on some of it), but so many little things seem off.

RJ Dalton:
snip about trailer shots

Well, they did finish principal photography about a month ago; it's possible that things look off because they rushed the various layers of editing and minute correction in order to have the trailer out this early.

Azuaron:
As an aside, what's the limiting factor on the length of a lightsaber? Power? Focusing crystal quality? Because it seems to me, whoever has the longest lightsaber has a clear advantage. If I can stab you when you're fifteen feet away, you'll never get far enough inside my guard to hit me with a traditionally lengthed 'saber. Clearly, we can't do light-polearms (an opponent would just cut through the pole), but if the blade of my saber is twelve feet long, apart from collateral damage (which, who cares), there's not really a downside since the blade is weightless.

Both power and crystal quality are factors; older, larger lightsabers had to have belt-mounted power packs to keep going, and while a bunch of different kinds of crystals can be used, most make inferior weapons.

The is also the gyroscopic effect, which isn't mentioned in the movies (because it's boring nerd stuff that gets in the way of blasters and one-liners) but plays a big part in the EU whenever training or designing lightsabers is mentioned. Basically, while the plasma is weightless, the fields that are containing it do resist changes in motion. It's not like swinging a flashlight, as CJ says, but more difficult and closer to a real sword. It's enough that smaller blades are noted to be easier to handle, so trying to swing a larger one would be proportionately more difficult; I imagine a 12-meter blade would be impossible to aim at anything in particular.

Although only a few people wield big lightsabers (usually giant aliens), you might be interested to know there is a kind of lightsaber specifically designed with a switch that takes it from the normal length of about a meter to about 3. It had a period of popularity as a dueling weapon, but the longer blade was only good for surprise attacks, and it fell out of favour.

Azuaron:

Yes, that's clearly the most important part of my rant. And easily solved by adjustable blade lengths. So... yeah.

Come on, you are ranting about a movie space-wizard wielding an impossible blade. So... yeah.

I is dumb sometimes.

Azuaron:
The problem with the cross-guard lightsaber, from my thinking, is that it highlights a problem lightsabers have always had: if I slide my lightsaber down your lightsaber, I will cut off your hand. We can argue that, like the katanas they're based on, the fighting style employed by lightsabers prevents that from happening, except the prequels have shown us that, given the choice, lightsabers are not used anything like katanas.

That being said, the kind of rapid-swing, choreographed fighting style exhibited in the prequels would prevent me from sliding my lightsaber down yours and cutting off your hand, but that just brings us back to the cross-guard lightsaber:

What possible fighting style could you have where that's effective? Watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hlIUrd7d1Q

They start using the swords at around 1:50. That's the traditional way to hold a sword of that size: one hand on the hilt, one hand on the blade. I'll give you a moment to think about that with a lightsaber.

Clearly, that's not what we're talking about. And, given a lightsaber's weight's going to be all-hilt and not that heavy no matter how long the blade, let's start talking about light, one-handed swords, even if that's clearly not what this sword is patterned on.

It's always seemed to me that lightsabers should be employed as fencing sabers. They're light. They move quickly. They have substantial reach without unbalancing the weapon. But fencing swords must have handguards because, in fencing, without a handguard you lose your hand. Even with a handguard, you're likely to take several hits to the arm before anything else.

So, let's assume this... light-claymore is going to be used like a fencer. I doubt it; I bet that sith swings the sword like he was Ned Stark the gymnast. But let's say he handles it like a fencer. The thing about those little side blades is... it looks like an opponent could just cut through the emitters, rendering them useless.

Oh, they're supposed to be offensive, not defensive? I would like you to think about getting the hilt of a sword close enough to your enemy and 1. you have not already stabbed them or B. they have not already stabbed you.

Now, if the Colbert Defense turns out to be true (which I doubt; I'm fairly certain one of those light-nubs is going to be cut off in a climactic moment), then maybe we have something here. Maybe we had a sith who looked at a lightsaber and said, "No wonder there's so many sith and jedi missing hands," and decided to do something about it. This could turn out to be an interesting weapon.

But I'm pretty sure someone said, "You know what would be badass? Lightsaber cross-guard," and they didn't take it any further than that.

As an aside, what's the limiting factor on the length of a lightsaber? Power? Focusing crystal quality? Because it seems to me, whoever has the longest lightsaber has a clear advantage. If I can stab you when you're fifteen feet away, you'll never get far enough inside my guard to hit me with a traditionally lengthed 'saber. Clearly, we can't do light-polearms (an opponent would just cut through the pole), but if the blade of my saber is twelve feet long, apart from collateral damage (which, who cares), there's not really a downside since the blade is weightless.

Fun fact, there have actually been Light-polearms in the EU. Went about as well as expected, you can look it up on Wookipedia if you like.
There's also been ones with Crossguards but, whatever, I guess we can all just rag on this Sith dude's one >.>

Though from a sword point of view, surely when the inevitable 'Lightsabers locked overhead' thing arises, bashing the Jedi saber away with the hilts is possible (not exactly EFFICIENT but it's a use for a common scenario).
Also of note, having a tiny precision cutting tool could be helpful in general scenarios.

CaptainMarvelous:

Fun fact, there have actually been Light-polearms in the EU. Went about as well as expected, you can look it up on Wookipedia if you like.

There have been a lot of reeeeeeally stupid things in the EU.

I don't really understand the reasoning of the 'lightsaber blades are weightless' group.

Sure, an attempt to guess at how they might work in reality would imply it, but EVERYTHING shown onscreen (and many things stated in background material) show otherwise.

Lightsaber blades have quite a bit of momentum. They are hard to swing. If anything, they are blade-heavy, given how they behave in a fight...

So arguing that they are hilt-heavy contradicts every piece of visual evidence we have of their use.

How then is this argument so common? Is it based on some reasoning from real-world physics?

OK, sure. But remember there is basically no practical way using real known physics to even create a weapon that behaves like a light-saber in even it's basic operation.

Sorry. But a flashlight is NOT a good analogy for the weight and balance of a light-saber. Look at any fight scene and this should be immediately obvious.

Yet it is still the goto argument of anyone that feels the need to discuss the combat implications of the weapon...

Surely, in the absence of any actual real-world reference point for the technology, the best place to start is with their observed behaviour, and work backwards from there?

After all, you don't do science by choosing a model, then, when that model conflicts with the available evidence, declaring the model correct, while throwing out all the contradicting evidence.

And the evidence, suggests a large amount of momentum involved in swinging a light-saber around... Which is the complete opposite of the argument being used.

For everyone saying that the blades would slide and hit the emitters: the blades are basically magnetically-sealed plasma. The magnetic field does something, that you'll agree can be demonstrated with a refrigerator magnet: try to put two magnets together at matching poles (or sabers together at the outside of the magnet bottle) and they will repel. Saber blades don't slide, they bounce. When they're locked together, they hiss and sputter and crackle as those magnet bottles try as hard as they can to repel each other. This is basically a shoving match, and the blades almost seem stuck, almost like magnetic strata of the containment bottle have intersected and the blades are entangled to each other. They won't slide, because they can't move. Not until they're separated.

I could be wrong, just commenting on observations and some of the more sciencey EU errata.

The main problem I have with it isn't that it isn't practical, the very concept of a lightsaber would never cut it in the real world, it's just that a lightsaber crossguard (mainly just a crossguard made of lightsaber, I could possibly understand the use of a crossguard made from tangible material made of anti-lightsaber material or whatever) serves absolutely no purpose and feels like they're trying to do something different for nothing beyond the sake of being different. I mean think about it, a lightsaber crossguard is pretty much the same has having blades as a crossguard on a sword. It's just not a feature you can actually use, it's nothing but eye candy in this case. The single purpose of a crossguard is to protect the user's hand, trying to weaponize pointless. Sure, you can make and use one if you really want to, there's just no chance it will ever be more effective than using a sword more traditionally. Stuff like whip or double sided lightsabers aren't super practical, but at least they fundamentally change the way a lightsaber would be used so there's at least some justification for their design. This new lightsaber on the other hand is nothing but window dressing.

Azuaron:
SNIP

Edit: The below statements about the use of lightsaber on/off switch have since been proven incorrect.

In the old EU there was lightsabers that could, in-fact, change their length but they weren't very common. Hell, in Star Wars: Rebels Kanans lightsaber is able to adjust the blades length.

One thing that's always kinda boggled me is why nobodies used the lightsabers main aspect mid-fight: The on/off button.

Hear me out.

Yes, turning your lightsaber off in the middle of a bloody fight sounds kinda of silly and I'm not recommending just turning it off for no reason but lets look at a few minor uses that the blade deactivating could have.

First example. Your in the middle of a sabre clash and doing the good old to-and-fro shove. What if, someone did the following: Mid clash, they maneuvered themselves to one side enough to not get cut by the other blade and, in the same motion, deactivated their blade. This would naturally make the other combatant stumble for a moment and, in that time, you swing and reactivate your blade mid swing so you can kill them while their guard is down. Or, alternatively, just thrust forward and reactivate the blade thereby skewering your enemy. Yes, this is a rather dangerous move to pull off but with the right timing, stance and reflexes (All three a good jedi would likely posses) you could pull off a good sneak attack.

Another possible move is simple: Turn off your opponents saber mid clash. Aka. While clashing, just reach a hand forwards to your enemies blades hilt and hit the off switch. Then, cut their head off. Granted, this one is dependent on if it has the switch or button at top of hilt design but i still think it's a viable strategy that's never been explored even if it's dependent on lightsaber hilt style.

And even if the moves aren't very Jedi: Why the hell hasn't any Sith done this either? A dirty fighter sith duelist would be fun to see.

On the Topic of the Cross-guard itself: Look, I admit I don't have TOO much problem with it as I can see the metal protrusions are out enough to not slice the hand off utterly but it does seem kind of...pointless to me. As the person I quoted said, if it's to guard then what's stopping the other duelist lobbing off the metal protrusions that emit the blade at that point? I still think it's kind of silly but, hey, at-least it's not a lightsaber whip...

What i honestly wouldn't mind seeing is a cross-guard like this if they wanted one:

ZZoMBiE13:
My problem with the light saber in the trailer has nothing to do with it's design. It's the desperate cloying going on.

It just seems desperate in a way that I don't think it needs to be. The fact that the added plasma blades are absurd is irrelevant.

Yep. That's my problem with it too. It just reeks of "Hey, look how cool we're making Star Wars now!"

I've always doubted how a lightsaber would work in real life because yeah, no weight to it. Original lightsabers were actually swords that had a power pack that plugged into them. They were used solely as ceremonial weapons and only held a charge for a minute or so. Then they evolved into what Luke and the Jedi use now in Star Wars. And yeah, a lot of the time is brought up that a Jedi--or Sith--rely on the Force to 'predict' attacks and allow the Force to guide them in battle. There have been a few non-Force users who can use was--Boba Fett, Grievous, and a girl that Jacen had a crush on to pick some--but they are certainly weapons meant to be used by Force wielders.

Infernai:

One thing that's always kinda boggled me is why nobodies used the lightsabers main aspect mid-fight: The on/off button.

Because Lightsaber blades don't appear/disappear instantaneous. There's a good part of a second before the blade has fully collapsed/ignited to full length. And at the speed that jedi fight at, that's ample time to get shredded, where you have no weapon to defend yourself (Since lightsaber combat works by spooling off memorized sequences, and those are centered around a full weapon, so the wielder is bound to either make mistakes or fight consciously, i.e much much slower.)

Edit: Clarification since a lot of people don't seem to know:

As mentioned, lightsaber combat works by using mild precognition, in conjuncture with an arsenal of memorized sequences. You try to predict which one your opponed will pick, and pick accordingly.
(See the Bane trilogy for reference)

That's really not much of a defense. Weak. Very weak.

For me, the biggest problem is it breaks internal consistency, and it's kind of goofy. If this is a serious problem, why does no-one else do anything about it? Jedi and Sith have been using the weapons for millenia, and they haven't worked this out? Additionally, the design with the emitters looks silly, and bringing Beskar or Cortosis in just makes it a real mess, and Cortosis in particular is just an balancing bit from various RPGs, and breaks the universe. There's no explaining the emitters without rendering the emitters pointless (If you have cortosis, you have basket hilts, crossguards, and no need for saber blades there), and there's no including the crossguard as a defensive slide down the blade thing without making the rest of the series look ill thought out and broken.

On the other hand, he looks like an evil wizard inquisitor type, which is awesome, and I love the menacing shape of the thing. SO I'm torn.

Is anyone really complaining about it not being practical? I thought the issue was that it looked stupid, as if they just wanted to up the 'cool factor' and took the first lame idea that some idiot tossed out.

Meh. Even if the force allowed the user to use the weapon, it's still less practical than a normal saber, which means the user would have to compromise even more in order to master the weapon, while receiving no tangible benefits.

That's right, I said no tangible benefits. Because the guard doesn't guard you. If saber runs down the length of the blade then it will hit the exposed light saber emitter, not the "guard." This will sever the blade and probably the hand as well. If you're going to have a guard, then create some small shield emitter that cups around the hand like a fencing saber. It would still look stupid, but at least it would be practical.

But on top of that, the damn thing looks ugly. It's something that 14 year old J.J. probably drew on his binder during math class.

Am I the only one who likes the saber?

I think it's neat, and I can see a few instances where jabbing the guard into some sunofabitch jedi to be useful, if not unexpected and odd considering most Saber combat. But, let's be honest guys. This is far more practical then tonfa-sabers, which have already been used.

Hrm, actually, is the Force Unleashed still canon?

Anyways, the saber is neat, and it allows for a more iconic weapon for a baddy. And it makes me a bit hopeful for diverse saber designs later on. Sure, Maul's double saber was sweet, and Dooku's curved hilt was a nice touch, but it'd like to see more takes on the design. So, hell yeah variety. Also, ain't no jedi gonna steal your saber and use it as effectively as you can, especially if there's a trick to the length of the guard sabers. (They could emit farther or shenanigans, I don't know, space magic swords.)

People complaining or "arguing" about this lightsaber are just looking for things to complain about because nothing will be good enough to live up to their precious original trilogy (which for the most part was fucking boring, especially the lightsaber duels, let's be honest and take off the nostalgia glasses for 30 seconds).

Everybody just assumes these are crossguards and for that reason alone pick apart why they won't work.. anybody ever think that they aren't crossguards at all? or that by the trailer they appear to be able to be turned on and off independently of the main blade so he might turn them off when they aren't necessary?

Did anybody stop to think how useful they might be to plunge into a Jedi's face or chest while using your superior Sith strength during a lightsaber clash? or even how dangerous those things would be to the Jedi's lightsaber or hands during a lightsaber clash?

By Star Wars lore and reasoning, Darth Maul intentionally left himself open for his opponents as to not get bored, he liked the danger, he purposely used the dual bladed saber because it made him vulnerable in certain ways, his weapon was impractical (more impractical than a regular saber*), but it didn't matter, he was still regarded as one of the best (arguably the best) with a lightsaber.

There is absolutely no reason why this new Sith could not find an effective way to use this weapon, if it was that much of a problem, he wouldn't use it, or maybe he likes the added danger. They don't have to be cross guards just because they look vaguely like cross guards, they don't always have to active, for all we know they could be nothing but a signature flourish he uses as a calling card.

Stop nitpicking things for the sake of nitpicking things, nobody has any idea how this saber will be used or wielded and none of us will know until we see the movie. let it go.

What it ultimately boils down to, is that if it needs defending, it's bad design. People accepted lightsabers off the bat, whether they were right to do so or not.

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