8-Bit Philosophy: Is Capitalism Bad For You?

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Is Capitalism Bad For You?

Max Weber on The Protestant Ethic & The Spirit of Capitalism.

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Fabulous. Absolutely fabulous. More of this, please! I loved the narrator, who sounds like he's channelling the voice of 'The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy'.

EDIT: Subscribed on YouTube, too.

I really want a lot more of videos like this. Great stuff even despite the huge flaw in the discussion expressed below:

Ugh... completely wrong on Calvinism. Their basic philosophy follows the acronym of TULIP in which Unconditional Election (that you are elected for salvation without any merits of your own) and Preseverance of the Saints (that God will preserve the salvation of the saints such that they cannot or will not fall from grace) are two central points. Perhaps you can understand why a belief system centered around people having no say for or against salvation would be ridiculous to be defined as something supporting working really hard to ensure salvation.

I'm not Calvinist but I specialized in soteriology for years including multiple works on the topic. Saying that Calvinists work extra hard to ensure their salvation is extremely ignorant of their core belief system.

In fact, regarding protestantism in general, one of the primary breaks from the Catholic Church was belief in salvation by faith alone and not by works. The Baptist churches frequently believe in things like Once Saved Always Saved (OSAS for shorthand in theological discussions) for example in which a person who has converted to Christianity is always saved and cannot lose that salvation.

So... you'd maybe need to drop back to Catholicism if you wanted to go the "works" route. It's unfortunate that Weber got it completely factually wrong.

The work ethic in the US can be much more easily attributed to social mobility or the notion that if we work really hard we can advance in society. It is also consumer based in that we need newer and better things non-stop.

But religion based? Not anywhere I've seen. In fact, Marxism is far more closely tied to predestination that capitalism is. The notion that your work and wage is predetermined is a dead ringer for that.

This was unusual and I'd like to see more of its like.

Unusual and I would like to see more. I find it very enjoyable.

Fascinating series... I'm glad to see something new anyway.

The nature of what is being covered is a bit beyond me, but that's fine. (I don't have the historical background to comment directly on the topic presented)

I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.
Not for the individual that takes it to heart, but rather, society as a whole.
What do you do when you define people's worth through their work, when the majority won't be able to find anything to do?

If you like this you maybe wanna check out the Wisecrack Youtube Channel. They do loads of intresting stuff, including this.

8-Bit Philosophy, on The Escapist? It's not even my birthday!

CrystalShadow:
I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.

I've considered this quite a bit lately. The notion that automation should eventually put people out of work. Ideally, this would mean a future where people don't have to work but are free to direct their attention to whatever pursuits they desire. But there's a lot of things in-between that could wreck us.

I imagine that the government will eventually have to legislate a certain ratio of human works be maintained for companies. That could side step the issue of massive layoffs with fewer consumers to buy things (because, again, layoffs).

We'll have to see how that turns out. What's sad is that robots will inevitably out-pace us eventually. There will be a day when there's nothing we can do that they can't do better. Everything from innovation to humor.

Interesting topic, and charming from its narrtor to its graphics. ^u^

I love a good e-series that teaches me something new, or has a novel voice to get me thinking... especially while lvl grinding or playing minecraft. I suppose this is just one more vid to keep an eye on!

CrystalShadow:
Fascinating series... I'm glad to see something new anyway.

The nature of what is being covered is a bit beyond me, but that's fine. (I don't have the historical background to comment directly on the topic presented)

I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.
Not for the individual that takes it to heart, but rather, society as a whole.
What do you do when you define people's worth through their work, when the majority won't be able to find anything to do?

She-Pudding:
Interesting topic, and charming from its narrtor to its graphics. ^u^

I love a good e-series that teaches me something new, or has a novel voice to get me thinking... especially while lvl grinding or playing minecraft. I suppose this is just one more vid to keep an eye on!

If you're curious about the topic, you can do further (if less humorously-illustrated) reading here and here.

Lightknight:

CrystalShadow:
I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.

I've considered this quite a bit lately. The notion that automation should eventually put people out of work. Ideally, this would mean a future where people don't have to work but are free to direct their attention to whatever pursuits they desire. But there's a lot of things in-between that could wreck us.

I imagine that the government will eventually have to legislate a certain ratio of human works be maintained for companies. That could side step the issue of massive layoffs with fewer consumers to buy things (because, again, layoffs).

We'll have to see how that turns out. What's sad is that robots will inevitably out-pace us eventually. There will be a day when there's nothing we can do that they can't do better. Everything from innovation to humor.

I don't see this eventuality as sad though. Freeing up human time spent on labors of love rather than necessity would be rather grand. I do think we'd need some shift in core values to avoid the pitfalls of being hedonistic consumers and pleasure-seeking machines, but not having to work for basic necessities could drive an artistic revolution. I don't know that we can say robots would ever be better at art since such valuation would be, in whole or large part, subjective.

Even if robots may eventually innovate better robots than we can, or at a faster pace than we do, I still think there would be plenty of worthwhile human endeavors that would rival anything a robot, no matter how sophisticated, could produce. Art and sport spring to mind.

Lightknight:

CrystalShadow:
I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.

I've considered this quite a bit lately. The notion that automation should eventually put people out of work. Ideally, this would mean a future where people don't have to work but are free to direct their attention to whatever pursuits they desire. But there's a lot of things in-between that could wreck us.

I imagine that the government will eventually have to legislate a certain ratio of human works be maintained for companies. That could side step the issue of massive layoffs with fewer consumers to buy things (because, again, layoffs).

We'll have to see how that turns out. What's sad is that robots will inevitably out-pace us eventually. There will be a day when there's nothing we can do that they can't do better. Everything from innovation to humor.

That's one solution. But an especially awkward one assuming the work would normally be done by machines for the sake of efficiency.

I would imagine a more viable solution longterm would be to remove all work related taxes, (primarily income tax), and try to ensure the remaining taxes can be distributed to the population.

Unfortunately, with current trends I rather fear the handful of people with enough wealth and power to control the automated manufacturing systems are more inclined to attempt mass irradication of the 'excess' population, either directly, or through starvation.

Pessimistic I suppose, but that's what I expect to see if we don't radically alter our value system before automation truly starts to take over everything...

an interesting if 1 sided argument.

as a socialist I'm not going to put to much of a counter argument, but...

what has 200 years of capitalism in the UK delivered :

3000% raise in income of a basic worker.
the wiping out of many dreaded diseases, hunger & mass poverty.
increase of average life span by 40 years.
Mass communication, internet & Entertainment
Game of Thrones
Porno

Anxiety has always been a issue. will we starve this winter without eating the children, will the cut on my finger kill me, will i live to be old (40). Capitalism brings progress & new anxiety.

P.S. I work for a LARGE well know internet retailer named after a south American river, but i can't say which. our productively targets have gone up by more than 50% in the last 3 months.

Weber's work is fascinating, but simply not supported by reality. The rise of capitalism simply didn't start in Protestant areas, we can see that, so he's completely off the ball there.

Still, gotta love listening to this sort of thing with the soothing voice of Nathan Lowe. I welcome more of these kind of episodes, awesome to see philosophy/academic subjects being addressed here as an actual philosophy student. But in the future I'd like to here more than one side.

Spankable:
le snip

It's a shame Weber never saw the rise of neo-liberalism from the late 70's and onwards, that's where capitalism showed its true problems. Regulated capitalism is indeed pretty good.

Not sure how i feel about this series. Watching it makes me feel as though i've jumped in half way through a lecture.

I feel like a statement of goals for the series and a road map at the beginning of the episodes would do nicely

Sylocat:

CrystalShadow:
Fascinating series... I'm glad to see something new anyway.

The nature of what is being covered is a bit beyond me, but that's fine. (I don't have the historical background to comment directly on the topic presented)

I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.
Not for the individual that takes it to heart, but rather, society as a whole.
What do you do when you define people's worth through their work, when the majority won't be able to find anything to do?

She-Pudding:
Interesting topic, and charming from its narrtor to its graphics. ^u^

I love a good e-series that teaches me something new, or has a novel voice to get me thinking... especially while lvl grinding or playing minecraft. I suppose this is just one more vid to keep an eye on!

If you're curious about the topic, you can do further (if less humorously-illustrated) reading here and here.

That definitely made for some fascinating reading. You don't see stuff like that started clearly very often...

CrystalShadow:

Lightknight:

CrystalShadow:
I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.

I've considered this quite a bit lately. The notion that automation should eventually put people out of work. Ideally, this would mean a future where people don't have to work but are free to direct their attention to whatever pursuits they desire. But there's a lot of things in-between that could wreck us.

I imagine that the government will eventually have to legislate a certain ratio of human works be maintained for companies. That could side step the issue of massive layoffs with fewer consumers to buy things (because, again, layoffs).

We'll have to see how that turns out. What's sad is that robots will inevitably out-pace us eventually. There will be a day when there's nothing we can do that they can't do better. Everything from innovation to humor.

That's one solution. But an especially awkward one assuming the work would normally be done by machines for the sake of efficiency.

I would imagine a more viable solution longterm would be to remove all work related taxes, (primarily income tax), and try to ensure the remaining taxes can be distributed to the population.

Unfortunately, with current trends I rather fear the handful of people with enough wealth and power to control the automated manufacturing systems are more inclined to attempt mass irradication of the 'excess' population, either directly, or through starvation.

Pessimistic I suppose, but that's what I expect to see if we don't radically alter our value system before automation truly starts to take over everything...

Starving the population is a really good way for those in power to get their heads lopped off and stuck on poles. Also, I'd say that a population is really only excessive (within the scope of this conversation) if it is difficult to house or feed said population, something which automation should make easier to do. You'd have excess population in comparison to work that you needed done, but I imagine you'd see a shift to jobs created for arts, sports and customer service rather than a summary round-up and extermination of those who can't find jobs. Not impossible of course, as the tactics you suggest have been used before. I just don't think it's all that likely to happen, and surely not likely to succeed.

That 20% bonus production/production efficiency the Netherlands gets in EU4 for being Calvinist is well worth the stupid quasi-religious work yourself to death mantra.

Wow, you guys nailed Wisecrack? Or just the philosophy branch? Either way, I'm really happy to see them here :D

Wow...and here I thought after certain members of the staff being let go, maybe The Escapist would have a little bit less political bullshit. Guess I was wrong. Though I'm really looking forward to the "Is Communism Bad For You?" episode, and hear how more people have been killed because of that oppressive system than have ever died or been negatively affected by capitalism. Wait, what am I talking about? This is The Escapist, the Pravda of gaming. Carry on, comrades.

Gorrath:

CrystalShadow:

Lightknight:
I've considered this quite a bit lately. The notion that automation should eventually put people out of work. Ideally, this would mean a future where people don't have to work but are free to direct their attention to whatever pursuits they desire. But there's a lot of things in-between that could wreck us.

I imagine that the government will eventually have to legislate a certain ratio of human works be maintained for companies. That could side step the issue of massive layoffs with fewer consumers to buy things (because, again, layoffs).

We'll have to see how that turns out. What's sad is that robots will inevitably out-pace us eventually. There will be a day when there's nothing we can do that they can't do better. Everything from innovation to humor.

That's one solution. But an especially awkward one assuming the work would normally be done by machines for the sake of efficiency.

I would imagine a more viable solution longterm would be to remove all work related taxes, (primarily income tax), and try to ensure the remaining taxes can be distributed to the population.

Unfortunately, with current trends I rather fear the handful of people with enough wealth and power to control the automated manufacturing systems are more inclined to attempt mass irradication of the 'excess' population, either directly, or through starvation.

Pessimistic I suppose, but that's what I expect to see if we don't radically alter our value system before automation truly starts to take over everything...

Starving the population is a really good way for those in power to get their heads lopped off and stuck on poles. Also, I'd say that a population is really only excessive (within the scope of this conversation) if it is difficult to house or feed said population, something which automation should make easier to do. You'd have excess population in comparison to work that you needed done, but I imagine you'd see a shift to jobs created for arts, sports and customer service rather than a summary round-up and extermination of those who can't find jobs. Not impossible of course, as the tactics you suggest have been used before. I just don't think it's all that likely to happen, and surely not likely to succeed.

It would depend on what kind of resources we have relative to the population, and what the minority might stand to gain from massive population reduction.

your implicatioon of shifting the work to other fields presumes those too don't end up subject to automation.
It seems a little naive to assume art and customer service jobs can't be automated, long-term. We're already seeing warning signs of retail staff being replaced with machines... Early days yet, but it's a bad sign on the whole.
As for sports, maybe. But only a handful of people hachave what it takes to be top athletes, and that being left in human hands would be mostly due to the incredibly arbitrary rules of 'fair' competition. Otherwise we wouldn't be checking for drugs. In other words, it's a field that isn't looking for the absolute best, but rather the best within a restricted set of criteria.

This kind of depends on how cynical you are, and how far you imagine automation to be able to get...
It's also possible to imagine a world where the machines themselves take over. What they do with us at that point would depend on what values we instill in them. Overly utilitarian reasoning (which seenems a reasonably probable resulyresult of our current values as a society), could easily lead the machines to question the purpose of the continued existence of humans...

In short, even being optimistic, what do you do with a huge number of people who cannot meaningfully contribute to society directly in the sense that we currently value what a person spends their time doing?
The options are pretty limited.
1. find 'busywork' that doesn't really serve any purpose, just to occupy these people's time...
2. Get them to do the work anyway, regardless of how absurdly innefficient that may end up by comparison to the machines.
3. Sort out a means of supporting this population without requiring anything from them in return
4. Eliminate as much of this population as possible...

Got any other potential options? because that's about all I can think of as alternatives...

Interesting video. Its not necessarily endorsing the ideas, but rather explaining where the idea is coming from. See, anxiety is a human trait, and we can have it no matter what. I work for myself, make my own hours and am happy with my job, very little anxiety there aside from the average customer being a pain in my ass.
However I've got other things that cause anxiety, and none of the examples I could think of immediately are not financially related.

Anxiety is a human trait, and we will experience it no matter what.

This has me wondering how much of the wisecrack channel might be joining the escapist. I have only checked out some of 8-bit philosophy stuff but I like the channel for thug notes.

CrystalShadow:

It would depend on what kind of resources we have relative to the population, and what the minority might stand to gain from massive population reduction.

No doubt, but mass genocide of populations don't tend to be effective when a minority (especially a rich one) is trying to kill of a majority. That majority tends to get pissed and start a revolution that ends up with that rich majority either fleeing or dead. Mileage here varies depending on how well armed said majority is.

your implicatioon of shifting the work to other fields presumes those too don't end up subject to automation.
It seems a little naive to assume art and customer service jobs can't be automated, long-term. We're already seeing warning signs of retail staff being replaced with machines... Early days yet, but it's a bad sign on the whole.
As for sports, maybe. But only a handful of people hachave what it takes to be top athletes, and that being left in human hands would be mostly due to the incredibly arbitrary rules of 'fair' competition. Otherwise we wouldn't be checking for drugs. In other words, it's a field that isn't looking for the absolute best, but rather the best within a restricted set of criteria.

It's not that you can't automate art or customer service; you certainly can. It's that people don't tend to particularly like art or customer service that's automated. It depends on what sort of customer service we're talking here, too but in broad terms people like to talk to people more than machines and that customer demand does have an effect. As for sports, if most people are unemployed because they simply don't need to work, they will be looking for diversions. With this growing demand, I think it's reasonable to assume more sports leagues at more levels would rise in demand. Same goes for art. All that leisure time needs to be filled with something and art/sports are two of human kind's favorite diversions.

This kind of depends on how cynical you are, and how far you imagine automation to be able to get...
It's also possible to imagine a world where the machines themselves take over. What they do with us at that point would depend on what values we instill in them. Overly utilitarian reasoning (which seenems a reasonably probable resulyresult of our current values as a society), could easily lead the machines to question the purpose of the continued existence of humans...

Eh, a machine takeover is a plausible flight of fancy. I don't think it warrants serious consideration until we at least have a working cognizant computer. I'm more concerned with what we'll do if 90% of human "work" becomes automated; it seems the more immediate issue. But, if we did come up with cognizant robots, we'd need to, as you said, instill values in them and hope those values stick. Otherwise, things could get messy.

In short, even being optimistic, what do you do with a huge number of people who cannot meaningfully contribute to society directly in the sense that we currently value what a person spends their time doing?
The options are pretty limited.
1. find 'busywork' that doesn't really serve any purpose, just to occupy these people's time...
2. Get them to do the work anyway, regardless of how absurdly innefficient that may end up by comparison to the machines.
3. Sort out a means of supporting this population without requiring anything from them in return
4. Eliminate as much of this population as possible...

Got any other potential options? because that's about all I can think of as alternatives...

1. This seems possible. A fair-few professions already engage in massive amounts of busywork. Hell, how much youtube gets watched at peak business hours I wonder. I know I contribute to that figure!

2. This seems less likely, unless efficiency isn't the most valuable part of the work. See: Art, sports, customer service. Any field you can think of where efficiency is less important than the human element, I think the automation problem isn't so much a problem.

3. Depending on the efficiency of the production of basic goods/services, this may become a reality. If you can produce all basic goods in mass quantities for a pittance, you don't really need the population to put anything back in. But we'll still want someone to act/draw/throw a football/have a chat with us, so that's where people will shift their focus I think.

4. And that's the rub. If automation becomes really good, there isn't really a need to reduce the population. Plus, threatening the lives of billions of people isn't likely to end up with them dead, it's likely to end up with you dead. You'd need a method for eradication and a reason (assuming our hypothetical rich minority aren't psychopaths.) In a world of automated plenty, you might get #1, but you'll be hard-pressed to get #2 I think.

I can't think of any others either, except perhaps space colonization. Still, I think 2-3 are probably enough to prevent 4 from being necessary or even desirable. It's the optimist in me.

My Mondays are saved! Hooray!

My main problem with american capitalism is that it's less capitalism and just people taking advantage of the system, it's like comparing Stalin's russia to socialism.

Also, americans like to point fingers and whoever they think is responsible at their state, which is anyone but them. Even the entertaiment industry lives on it, the big evil guy is the rich white american tycoon, not the branch manager who lays off workers to make the end year look more positive and gives the guy's salary to himself.

Lightknight:

CrystalShadow:
I do fear a 'work ethic' Is slowly becoming a liability though. Because of automation and it's long term implications, having that as a core social value is going to bite us in the butt sooner or later.

I've considered this quite a bit lately. The notion that automation should eventually put people out of work. Ideally, this would mean a future where people don't have to work but are free to direct their attention to whatever pursuits they desire. But there's a lot of things in-between that could wreck us.

I imagine that the government will eventually have to legislate a certain ratio of human works be maintained for companies. That could side step the issue of massive layoffs with fewer consumers to buy things (because, again, layoffs).

We'll have to see how that turns out. What's sad is that robots will inevitably out-pace us eventually. There will be a day when there's nothing we can do that they can't do better. Everything from innovation to humor.

If this ever comes to pass then eventually no goods or services will have any value, so economy will be a moot point. Just go and take whatever it is you want. You've basically shot straight past capitalism, through socialism and into a complete utopian world.

LysanderNemoinis:
Wow...and here I thought after certain members of the staff being let go, maybe The Escapist would have a little bit less political bullshit. Guess I was wrong. Though I'm really looking forward to the "Is Communism Bad For You?" episode, and hear how more people have been killed because of that oppressive system than have ever died or been negatively affected by capitalism. Wait, what am I talking about? This is The Escapist, the Pravda of gaming. Carry on, comrades.

You think you are better off *not* knowing the history and possible weaknesses of the systems you support?

I suspect that any *successful* capitalist revels in learning about the systems he uses far more than adding another kick at a moribund system. But certainly your attitude will go far if you're interested in working for the government rather than capitalism as a whole.

Wouldn't the fear of being fired have to do more with having a fixed mindset or the absence of a growth mindset?

TomWest:

LysanderNemoinis:
Wow...and here I thought after certain members of the staff being let go, maybe The Escapist would have a little bit less political bullshit. Guess I was wrong. Though I'm really looking forward to the "Is Communism Bad For You?" episode, and hear how more people have been killed because of that oppressive system than have ever died or been negatively affected by capitalism. Wait, what am I talking about? This is The Escapist, the Pravda of gaming. Carry on, comrades.

You think you are better off *not* knowing the history and possible weaknesses of the systems you support?

I suspect that any *successful* capitalist revels in learning about the systems he uses far more than adding another kick at a moribund system. But certainly your attitude will go far if you're interested in working for the government rather than capitalism as a whole.

Oh, I certainly know my history. It's why I hate communism. And while capitalism is not a perfect system, not by a long shot, it's also the best system mankind has come up with. Whatever it's roots, whatever it's failing and abuses in the past (and sometimes in the present), it's also the thing that allowed most of us to be living the lives we are with the creature comforts and technology we have.

Hell, America wouldn't even exist without people who were determined to be able to live as they wanted, to work for themselves, and not have a government tell them what to do, how to work, and what to think. After all, for every person that abuses the system or takes advantage of their workers, there's hundreds if not thousands of business owners who do right by their employees and enable themselves and those that work for them to provide good lives for their families.

My main problem is that once again, The Escapist is putting up a completely one-sided argument without even mentioning the possibility that there's another side or that communism is far worse. Plus, it's also lazy as hell. I mean, exactly how many comments appeared that weren't just a bunch of head-bobbing and tut-tuting about this modern day boogieman? Aside from me and a couple others, I doubt there were many people who clicked on the video who don't already think capitalism is the tool of the devil (here represented by a straight white male) even without this video's 'evidence.'

LysanderNemoinis:
Wow...and here I thought after certain members of the staff being let go, maybe The Escapist would have a little bit less political bullshit. Guess I was wrong. Though I'm really looking forward to the "Is Communism Bad For You?" episode, and hear how more people have been killed because of that oppressive system than have ever died or been negatively affected by capitalism. Wait, what am I talking about? This is The Escapist, the Pravda of gaming. Carry on, comrades.

That's impossible. The number of deaths that can easily be attributed to manipulative capitalist imperialism in Africa, India, South America, Central America, and China far out number the deaths that can be attributed to Communism in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe. Just looking at the size of the population groups under these ideologies should make it clear enough, capitalism had a much larger reach. Ultimately, Communism can be blamed for some 70 million deaths at the high end. Capitalism can be blamed for almost half of that through WWI alone, let alone the opium wars, the race to colonize Africa, the loss of life, economic productivity, and food in British India, and the abuses in South America carried out by the west. This is still all ignoring that the capitalist imperialism of the 19th century can be blamed for much of the current situation in the middle east, Africa, and south east Asia. Regardless of whether or not Capitalism is truly better or worse than Communism, the sheer breadth of Capitalism's effects on humanity should easily put it above Communism's body count.

Also, at what point did this video promote communism, and in what way is calling out the abuses of capitalism, the flaws, tantamount to supporting communism? One does not need to be a communist to read Weber, especially considering that Weber was not a communist.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Weber

What is this drivel? Video should be titled "Max Weber's take on Capitalism", there's no real discussion about whether Capitalism is good or bad for you.

Zato-1:
What is this drivel? Video should be titled "Max Weber's take on Capitalism", there's no real discussion about whether Capitalism is good or bad for you.

It's not designed as a discussion, but as a crash course, you have to bring your own discussion on how you feel about the information provided.(I agree with the title change, but the last sentence in the video leaves an open ended thought on the subject for you to infer your own conclusions....)

That being said, it's no worse for you then any economic system, as you have an ability, no matter how slim to score riches for your efforts as long as those efforts pay you back the time spent. Where as other systems can grant everyone the base living safety net, but your labor will not give you any means more then that...

All and all, I'm rather happy to see Wisecrack expanding to other websites. I prefer Thug Notes myself, and if you've not had the pleasure of watching it, I recommend it. 8-Bit Philosophy covers a broad spectrum of subjects, it just so happened this one was economical/political.

Do that again I loved it. Do more of this. Its nice to see some intellegent content for a chnage.

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