Meet the Man Who Decided What Went in Dungeons & Dragons

Meet the Man Who Decided What Went in Dungeons & Dragons

Jeremy Crawford is Wizards of the Coast's Lead Editor & Developer for Dungeons & Dragons, charged with the sometimes frustrating role of making hard choices about game content.

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All of my local players are now D&D 5E fans and both games I host as DM are for D&D 5E now so I'd say his blood, sweat and tears paid off for us, at least.

camazotz:
All of my local players are now D&D 5E fans and both games I host as DM are for D&D 5E now so I'd say his blood, sweat and tears paid off for us, at least.

Yeah my group played 2E mostly but we've played a bunch of 5E now and I am loving it so much more, they really did well with this one.

Similarly, Crawford placed importance on D&D's many worlds as one of his pillars. "There are many roleplaying games on the market, but few of them are as broad in their aesthetic reach as D&D is expected to be. D&D has this multiverse where many worlds are part of one setting and that has been around for a long time. Over time though that connection was eroded, so rather than being all D&D in different worlds they were almost different games: Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Dragonlance, Ravenloft... but we wanted to undo that."

Interesting to hear that, given that so many of the announcements made during development were about how modular 5e was going to be, about how you could make a bunch of different games to suit the different worlds rather than trying to force pulpy magitek and Gothic horror as close as possible.

Also interesting to hear that it was Crawford who wanted them to step back from the 4e rules structure, given how much he put into making it. I really liked how explicit and clean it was, with every one of the thousands of powers very clearly defined in how they worked so that the DM could tell at a glance how they would work, rather than 3.X's habit of drawing from terms used in multiple books and creating weird interactions, or things like 5e's muddy wording allowing you to conjure a piece of the Sun. I appreciate what he was trying to do, but (at least in my experience) I don't think he quite got what he wanted.

 

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