8 of the Best D&D Modules of All Time

8 of the Best D&D Modules of All Time

If you want to experience the best of Dungeons & Dragons, these eight modules are a great place to start.

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Yup Temple of elemental evil was one the best. I still remember playing it in the early 80s. Lankhmar - City of Adventure was another good module from around them. It was more a source book than an adventure but it was really atmospheric.

Honestly, I never really liked "Queen of the Spiders". Against the Giants is a fantastic series, and the drow stuff isn't bad, but I never thought it came together as a whole particularly well. It really felt like they welded two module series together and added in some shaky bridges.

And while you mentioned some 4e updates, I'm surprised you missed Madness at Gardmore Abbey, easily the best module of 4e and one that stands with the greats of past editions. It uses the strengths of the system (powerful PCs, easy planar travel), ropes in some classic D&D ideas like a red dragon (and the mystery boss), and crams so much into there that any group that actually manages to get through it in the suggested number of sessions is missing some fantastic content.

No Expedition to the Barrier Peaks?! Always thought that was one of the best.

Aww, no Council of Wyrms? That sucks. I liked the idea of a system set up to play as a dragon.

Flashman:
No Expedition to the Barrier Peaks?! Always thought that was one of the best.

It's famous, but I've always found it better to read and laugh at than to actually run. Then again, I've never met someone who really liked Tomb of Horrors as anything more than a novelty, so what do I know.

Thunderous Cacophony:

And while you mentioned some 4e updates, I'm surprised you missed Madness at Gardmore Abbey, easily the best module of 4e and one that stands with the greats of past editions. It uses the strengths of the system (powerful PCs, easy planar travel), ropes in some classic D&D ideas like a red dragon (and the mystery boss), and crams so much into there that any group that actually manages to get through it in the suggested number of sessions is missing some fantastic content.

Yeah, Madness at Gardmore Abbey was a good time. I also enjoyed Pyramid of Shadows. I thought the setting and setup in that one was really good.

Tomb of Horrors is a meat grinder, it's not meant to actually be played. It's what you pull out when you're players get to uppity. No one actually wins Tomb of Horrors, save turning right around when they see it and heading back to town.

Good-bye forever Greyback Thornehelm the warrior, ye tasted the Sphere of Annihilation and it was

No reference to the Ravenloft cover being used for Castlevania II's boxart?

Ah, ravenloft. Some of the best D&D litterature I've ever read, and some of the best litterature I've read. I got the boxed set back in the 90's and still have it with the Tarokka cards.
Never really got a chanceto do anything in terms of playing it, though.

Monsters, rise, falls, redemptions, layers of plot, a diverse world, great characters, the hopes of playing something as something supernatural.

 

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