8 Ill-Fated Videogame Consoles

8 Ill-Fated Videogame Consoles

Do you remember these eight less-than-successful gaming consoles?

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sega CD was kind of a flop didnt it ? all i remember of that is like 3 or 4 games.

dreamcast, while being relatively popular did end up to be a flop too

...Phil Collins went somewhere near a GTA game?
Dude...

cathou:
sega CD was kind of a flop didnt it ? all i remember of that is like 3 or 4 games.

dreamcast, while being relatively popular did end up to be a flop too

Both of those vastly outsold those on this list. Dreamcast is about 17th on the list of best selling home consoles still a flop but there are between 50-100 that sold worse.

The Sega CD was perfect for huge, sprawling 2D platformers and RPGs with long, involved stories.

Unfortunately, publishers decided that a console with a limited color pallete should get lousy FMV games.

Somehow I doubt a console named Pippin would have had much of a chance, anyway. Cute name for a wee dog, though.

And that controller looks pretty bad. Not CD-i bad, but slippy.

So the Nintendo VirtualBoy basically turned every video-gaming experience into 28 Days Later?

A correction on the CD-i. It was NOT meant to be the SNES Cd addon, that was a separate project. The deal was that Phillips would make the CD addon for the SNEs and in exchange they would get the license for four titles centered around Nintendo game environments for their new CD-i platform. Nintendo dropped the CD addon idea later but Philips was still given permission to put out their games. You have the conversion confused with the Sony deal which was converted into the Playstation.

I think the N-Gage is the only reason I'm glad I was poor at the time of it's release. I really wanted one, it wasn't until much later I found out just how crappy it was.

Still no love for the WonderSwan.

LordLundar:
A correction on the CD-i. It was NOT meant to be the SNES Cd addon, that was a separate project. The deal was that Phillips would make the CD addon for the SNEs and in exchange they would get the license for four titles centered around Nintendo game environments for their new CD-i platform. Nintendo dropped the CD addon idea later but Philips was still given permission to put out their games. You have the conversion confused with the Sony deal which was converted into the Playstation.

I guess it would be more accurate to say that the CD-i was "based on" the SNES CD add-on. Philips only decided to use the designs to fashion the CD-i after Nintendo scrapped the CD add-on project.

The CD-i was built off the designs that Philips had for the SNES-CD, which Nintendo had lined them up to produce due to disagreements with Sony. The whole Philips deal came into being because Sony and Nintendo couldn't come together on a licensing agreement. The biggest reason for this was that Sony wanted to retain control of the SNES CD disc format, which would have meant Nintendo giving Sony a large amount of control over software licensing. Nintendo was not willing to do this.

In fact, at CES in 1991, Sony showed off a SNES-compatible combination cartridge/CD console called the "Play Station." The next day at the same show, Nintendo announced the partnership with Philips to produce the add-on.

The SNES CD add-on project actually spawned two competitor consoles. Only one of them survived the marketplace, though.

What was that other thing? The Gizmondo, was it?

 

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