189: Pirates Anonymous

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Hey there

Apologies for the slightly different account name. I am genuinely the author, though.

Interesting thoughts in response to the article. Thank you for the compliments where you've made them, they're appreciated. I thought it worth responding to some of the other stuff, though. This may be long.

Entharion:

And then a mysterious disc entered my life. I loaded it into my PC and up came an animated menu with a list of recent games.

The twilight cd... yes, these were a real crime indeed, never knew where to get them tho, someone else gave them to me.

Different brand, but I suspect the end result was the same. This was a locally produced CD in the UK.

coldcorpse:
That's very nice, but you live in civilized country.

Absolutely, my situation cannot be the same as everyone else's and I don't pretend it is. We all make our own choices.

Nerdfury:
This sounds like a plot for an episode of a bad 80s sitcom. I'm waiting for the protagonist to sit down with the naughty child and ask them what they've learned today, then for someone to say something amusing and everyone starts laughing - cue credits.

It's just an opinion piece, based on my own truth. Sorry you didn't like it or the sentiment.

Razorback0z:
Im with Nurb.

It was a pretty isolated experience in comparison to most people and the author (no offence) sounds like he could have been just as easily hooked on Transformer models or Comics.

I pretty much get hooked on everything, and have a pile of bought and unplayed games now rather than pirated ones. And TV series - geez, piles of discs of torrented series that I get hopelessly hooked to and addicted to. But, it is piracy regardless of motivations, and it removed my income from the pool for a great deal of time.

ReverseEngineered:
While I won't deny that the author was addicted to piracy, let's make it clear that this is not what piracy is about. Not all pirates (or probably even most pirates) collect merely for the sake of collecting.

It's interesting that people (not just you, others in the thread) see piracy as a movement, with an ethos and general motivating factor.

Me; I like having stuff I want for free. Can't be bothered to justify it beyond that, really.

SamLowry:

Nerdfury:
This sounds like a plot for an episode of a bad 80s sitcom. I'm waiting for the protagonist to sit down with the naughty child and ask them what they've learned today, then for someone to say something amusing and everyone starts laughing - cue credits.

Don't copy that floppy!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=DE&hl=de&v=-Xfqkdh5Js4

@Article:

This break allowed me to gain some perspective on my addiction. I hadn't been saving money; I was spending it on blank discs, consoles I didn't need and PC upgrades to run games I never intended to play in any depth.

That was the moment I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.
Considering prices of games, how can a disc ever-ever be as expensive as a full-priced game?

Rather than giving me a true, wide-ranging appreciation of the medium, I'd simply been skimming the surface, digesting little. I'd begun to look at games as mere commodities, undermining their value with every disc I copied and shared.

Here's the fitting quote for you: "90% of everything is crud"
As a pirate, you could actually experience the full amount of juvenile SHIT that gets shoved out the distribution channels each month... of course - as a "normal" buyer - you neither have the time or money to do so... so you can only experience the tip of the iceberg. As an addict you overcame the financial burden to realize what games really are, but still didn't solve the not-to-be-solved problem of their time-soaking efficiency.

More to the point: This is the very moment where I began to think of "Darren Sandbach" as Gaming Industry's Mock-Up Spokesperson. Really. What is the meaning of his text above? Read it again! Carefully! And you will come up with something along these lines:
That games are beautiful art, full of life-enhancing lore and experiences - even better than real-life friendships, social events, beer and sex combined, BUT evil-doers like PIRATES turn those beautiful artsy-pearls into mere COMMODITIES!
Background choir goes: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH!! *shocking*!!!
Yeah... every game is a piece of art and girls' farts smell like cinnamon...

What's next, Darren (if that is your name)?
Back to your fantasy world, virtual Darren, back to your fantasy world...

@Real author:
Don't forget to cash in your pay-check on your way out.
At least that one oughta be real... shouldn't it?

This is actually offensive. Not everything's a conspiracy you know, and this is simply my experience. Whilst I am sorry that the piece didn't hit the right notes for you, I would prefer it if you didn't resort to questioning my integrity (or my identity!) right off the bat.

ZippyDSMlee:
Pirating has become a social movement. The CP owners the CP farms have to much power and influence on society. As they seek to gain absolute control over distribution they ensure that the CP creator/Artist is forced to become a pack animal they can make money from.

Because the industry is insipid and pervasive I support civil disobedience, this is akin to the civil rights movement were a segment of the population is disrespected and walked on the common artist and consumer is fodder for CP/Corporate fascism.

IMO they need to change business models to a profit focus (meaning free non profit shearing is legal)if its making money they have absolute right to a piece of that pie but the industry will have to give up its authoritative and top heavy nature and focus on gaining a portion of "data" sales via streamlined revenue streams IE they can produce something for 30-99$ as a special release then let licensees sell it burned to disk or drive or in a retail box for 1-30$ let the market and sellers drive prices and the media industry gain a steady 50% or so of the final sale. All of this will keep prices fluid and keep volume high and everyone from the retailer to the CP owner is making money and sustaining the industry instead of a stagnant and self damaging industry..

If they did this infinite CP or "profit rights" would not effect the common man nor stagnate the industry in a vile and insipid way as it dose with the distribution focused model..
/incoherent intellectual

I read CP as Child Porn...and that made this post make me feel dirty.

SamLowry:

seitori:
PC games aren't worth it anymore.

4 words for you:
Sins.
Of.
Solar.
Empires.

Treat the people you want to sell your product to with respect and you get respected.
Treat them as triple-time convicted chaingang murderer-rapists and you get... [fill this one yourselves...]

Aren't worth what, exactly? If you are going to misquote me (and completely miss my point in the process), at least be clear about it.

I also don't understand why you bring up Sins of a Solar Empire. If you're saying it's enough to resurrect PC gaming, I disagree, having found that it was middle of the road in terms of RTS games. It had some critical flaws.

Also note the industry isn't looking for respect, just your money. Having an adversarial relationship with your customers is bad, yes, but they are still paying customers.

DSandbach:
Hey there

Apologies for the slightly different account name. I am genuinely the author, though.

Interesting thoughts in response to the article. Thank you for the compliments where you've made them, they're appreciated. I thought it worth responding to some of the other stuff, though. This may be long.

Nerdfury:
This sounds like a plot for an episode of a bad 80s sitcom. I'm waiting for the protagonist to sit down with the naughty child and ask them what they've learned today, then for someone to say something amusing and everyone starts laughing - cue credits.

It's just an opinion piece, based on my own truth. Sorry you didn't like it or the sentiment.

Defensive much?

A very good read, as far as articles go. I've never been able to focus long enough to collect something - games, books, stamps, quarters, whatever - for more than a couple years, and never get close to the sort of "want for wanting's sake" frenzy, just because then something even shinier catches my eye.

Also, the closest I've gotten to pirating games is downloading old snes roms. And sometimes gba roms, but it gets boring being tethered to the computer like that. Really, I'm just a tad too lazy to get one of those DS cartridge thingies. But again, a very good and fun article!

Nerdfury:
[quote="DSandbach" post="6.88455.1378575"]
Defensive much?

How so?

DSandbach:
Hey there

ReverseEngineered:
While I won't deny that the author was addicted to piracy, let's make it clear that this is not what piracy is about. Not all pirates (or probably even most pirates) collect merely for the sake of collecting.

It's interesting that people (not just you, others in the thread) see piracy as a movement, with an ethos and general motivating factor.

Me; I like having stuff I want for free. Can't be bothered to justify it beyond that, really.

Actually, I'm not really stating that it has a mythos -- sure, some people think it's a crusade against "the man", but not everybody. I'm just saying that not everybody who downloads things does so for the sake of building a collection (as the author did -- downloading things he knew he would never touch for the sake of having them). Instead, as you said, most just download stuff because they want it for free.

Couldn't agree more. That's what I did at one point. "Well, that game just came out.. I may want to give it a try." And then, I never end up playing it. Or I play for about 5 minutes and quit. I have no REAL desire to play it, just to have it. Just to know I could play it if I wanted to.
I got past that though.. I still only buy games that I know are worth it to me. Games that I thoroughly enjoy, or that have good replay/multiplayer I will always buy.

And, for console gaming, I found that getting a game pass at Blockbuster works great for playing all the newest titles. 20$ or so a month, and I would be playing every new game that came out last 08 season. Fable, Fallout, GoW2 etc. All for just 20$.

CriMs0nC0bra:
Couldn't agree more. That's what I did at one point. "Well, that game just came out.. I may want to give it a try." And then, I never end up playing it. Or I play for about 5 minutes and quit. I have no REAL desire to play it, just to have it. Just to know I could play it if I wanted to.
I got past that though.. I still only buy games that I know are worth it to me. Games that I thoroughly enjoy, or that have good replay/multiplayer I will always buy.

And, for console gaming, I found that getting a game pass at Blockbuster works great for playing all the newest titles. 20$ or so a month, and I would be playing every new game that came out last 08 season. Fable, Fallout, GoW2 etc. All for just 20$.

See, I think the whole rental thing is interesting, because one of the core arguments people have to justify piracy is "it's too expensive". Yet here are these models that have been set up that enable you to try everything at absolutely rock bottom price; it's impossible to argue the value of the rental model, particularly the postal ones we have here in the UK (20 a month for unlimited movies and games, 3 at a time, each month? Crazy).

And let's not forget the second hand market. Coming to the 360 late meant I picked up around 15 games for 150. Now I have the upcoming year of gaming mapped out!

Chipping a 360 is a waste, although i would like to get all my 360 games for free just as i do my PC games, there's gotta be a limit and somewhere where you start contributing to the company of a game you like. And he should've seen it coming too.

Anyone with at leat half a brain-cell will be able to figure out how to download hacked games, and even without risking their PC's wellbeing after some experience.

My friend hacks PSP's on a daily basis for free (if mine hadn't gotten stolen twice mine would be too), and it happens even more often in Hong-Kong, Japan, china, etc. And that's where the PSP's originated too!

Oh wait, he was using an original Xbox. Oh well, same thing happens with the 360's anyways. And what was the point of collecting pirated games he wasn't gonna play. I may have a half-a-terrabyte hard drive, but i still have limits. He was risking alot, but getting almost nothing back.

And something else i discovered.
We are all children at heart, and whenever i was a kid, cracking open a new game for my Xbox game me a great feeling. Reading the box and the manual and admiring at the picture on the disc. But downloading games takes that all away.

But with my 360, i get that feeling back. God bless the Xbox 360!

theultimateend:

ZippyDSMlee:
Pirating has become a social movement. The CP owners the CP farms have to much power and influence on society. As they seek to gain absolute control over distribution they ensure that the CP creator/Artist is forced to become a pack animal they can make money from.

Because the industry is insipid and pervasive I support civil disobedience, this is akin to the civil rights movement were a segment of the population is disrespected and walked on the common artist and consumer is fodder for CP/Corporate fascism.

IMO they need to change business models to a profit focus (meaning free non profit shearing is legal)if its making money they have absolute right to a piece of that pie but the industry will have to give up its authoritative and top heavy nature and focus on gaining a portion of "data" sales via streamlined revenue streams IE they can produce something for 30-99$ as a special release then let licensees sell it burned to disk or drive or in a retail box for 1-30$ let the market and sellers drive prices and the media industry gain a steady 50% or so of the final sale. All of this will keep prices fluid and keep volume high and everyone from the retailer to the CP owner is making money and sustaining the industry instead of a stagnant and self damaging industry..

If they did this infinite CP or "profit rights" would not effect the common man nor stagnate the industry in a vile and insipid way as it dose with the distribution focused model..
/incoherent intellectual

I read CP as Child Porn...and that made this post make me feel dirty.

Yes well CP has been used for Copy right longer than it has been misused for child porn.....

This is roughly the equivelant to you ducking out of a meal at a restaurant if you didn't like it. It's not the same because they didn't have to pay to make the meal, but it's similar. I don't use torrents, I use rapidshare. Pay 5 a month and get 2.6GB of high speed bandwidth a day. You get the best of every world because I don't download excessively and I play every game I DL unless it's a piece of crap (TRunderworld, you suck). So it's possible to find equilibrium. Multiplayer games I buy though (UT3 and Valve games)

no it's not. a videogame is an investment of both time and money, and is something you will be experiencing for some time to come. a bad meal goes away. what i do is equivalent to walking by a table, snatching a bite of someones food and then purchasing if i like it, or leaving if i don't.

and besides, if you've ever worked at a restaurant than you'd know that it's no uncommon for someone to eat half a meal, claim they didn't like it and get the damn thing taken off of the bill.

This article was kinda weird. Really what was it supposed to be about ? It seemed to me like little more than a big "finding myself" whinefest with some piracy thrown in to sell the article. And piracy had nothing to do with this you said yourself that you got games more for collecting them than playing them even before you started pirating games. It was well written and I suppose it's your article so you can talk about w/e you want but the content was just uninteresting.

..... isn't this similar to the dude who started to bargain shop games?
That one line:
"games were a necessity, food was a luxury"
that EXACT line was used! Or is it just me?

Many years ago I've pirated some games, but truth be told back then I've barely understood the basics of what computer and videogame are. I don't pirate games for more than 10 years now.

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