Why Do We Keep E3 Around, Anyway?

Why Do We Keep E3 Around, Anyway?

E3 doesn't seem to matter much these days, so why do we keep it around?

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I think Mafia 3 looks really good, I agree with you on Titanfall, I'm annoyed at publishers that try to get away with selling games with half the content they should have for full price, too many people were willing to forgive Rainbow Six Siege for being overpriced simply because they badly wanted something "hardcore". Titanfall 2 definitely looks like an improvement though and I will be checking it out.

Infinite Warfare looks pretty cool, it doesn't matter how many people downvote trailers for the game, it's still going to sell like hotcakes. Don't think BF1 will break sales records, people on the internet talking a lot about something does not guarantee it will be a hit(Snakes on a Plane anyone?).

You always need a professional source to cite from vs the extremely fickle audience you created Yahtzee. You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon. There is no "consistency" for a non professional reviewer who goes from minute of being the guy who sings your praise or the bitter man who sees nothing golden in life (One only needs to look at /v/ for the final product that Yahtzee made)

E3 is the proverbial litmus test to see if you made it to the big leagues and worth being scooped up by investors who promises you money in exchange for your soul. Sure we have Nintendo Direct but the thing is with big Japanese companies is they actively resist all attempts at fan based advertising. They are highly orthodox corporation who don't want a bunch of peasants with their version of a YELP account shilling for them. They want assurance and consistency and E3 is the perfect PR medium for that special occasion. Same applies to some of the big publishers who wants to maintain a market presence to keep the investors happy at the meeting as nothing causes more panic than not being able to make it to E3 this year.

TL:DR: E3 offers consistency.

gyrobot:

E3 is the proverbial litmus test to see if you made it to the big leagues and worth being scooped up by investors who promises you money in exchange for your soul.

Care to give your professional source, please?

And just like the Euro (*heavy sigh*) vision, it only becomes tolerable with a few glasses of wine. Surely you had to have seen that live-stream fuckup where the Jason game turned out as some 8bit joke, then the guy drank footwater while surrounded by people in animal onesies? I swear I didn't dream that! But a vigorous DIY analysis tells me they are most certainly not on a human or Earth-creature wavelength. We need our best people on this...I have a feeling these publishers are hiding alien baby farms somewhere, where they make, grow and teach these things how to behave like you us humans, ready to release into E3 all full of conditioned alien joy...greasing the excitement and wallets of the public.
I have seen things, man. Things you wouldn't believe. Alien cub pods as far as the eye can see. Petri dishes of plutonium pheromones injected into each. Lost good men (and women) to those places. Hang on, no...that was a dream. Forget I said anything. Please, continue.

CaitSeith:

gyrobot:

E3 is the proverbial litmus test to see if you made it to the big leagues and worth being scooped up by investors who promises you money in exchange for your soul.

Care to give your professional source, please?

Isn't it common logic to see it that way? Big commercial event with the press coming here to ask questions and try out shit with limited press conferences = big corp PR opportunity.

gyrobot:

CaitSeith:

gyrobot:

E3 is the proverbial litmus test to see if you made it to the big leagues and worth being scooped up by investors who promises you money in exchange for your soul.

Care to give your professional source, please?

Isn't it common logic to see it that way? Big commercial event with the press coming here to ask questions and try out shit with limited press conferences = big corp PR opportunity.

Oh... sorry. Since you pointed out the need of a professional source to cite, I thought your opinion had one. My mistake.

E3 puts me in mind of a political rally/debate where candidates take turns lying to us in order to curry favor.

People enjoy it.

Just because you're jaded enough that you find no enjoyment out of a show that announces upcoming games is not an indicator of what the rest of us feel.

gyrobot:
You always need a professional source to cite from vs the extremely fickle audience you created Yahtzee. You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon. There is no "consistency" for a non professional reviewer who goes from minute of being the guy who sings your praise or the bitter man who sees nothing golden in life (One only needs to look at /v/ for the final product that Yahtzee made)

That audience was around a long time before Yahtzee was. I'm not sure if you know this or not, but there were people satirically reviewing games on the interwebs long before Yahtzee. I fail to see how he had a hand in creating an audience that's been around since internet forums existed. The heaviest amount of influence I've seen Yahtzee have on the gaming community is that he coined the term PC Master Race. Occasionally he pisses off overly sensitive Nintendrones.

If a jaded gaming community exists, it's the industry's fault. Negativity generated by reviewers is merely a symptom, because people wouldn't agree if they didn't also feel that way. Companies get caught miming playthroughs, bullshitting us on graphics, and announcing sequels/reboots to fuel the hype train and get preorders basically every year. Announcements are fine and all, but watching a man stand up one stage for an hour and try to sell us stuff like he's Peter Molyneux's understudy is boring as shit when I can just go to YouTube and see what matters - the announcement trailers - right there on the front page.

It's a cool event for the press, since they get to play the demos and all, but people have been cooling off on E3 ever since they closed their doors to the general public.

gyrobot:
You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon.

Hey, don't drag us into this. Croshaw was born '83. It's him and the rest of the Gen-X '80s kids that have been the cynical, self-absorbed problem as far back as the early 2000s. All '90s kids ever wanted was to enjoy themselves without having to deal with '80s kids constantly bitching about sharing the attention and acting like a pack of edgy twits. Their generation started this mess.

Lately I've rethought this, and now believe that the closer equivalent to E3 is the Eurovision Song Contest.

As someone who finally saw the ESC[1] for the first time, I can't help but laugh in agreement... Now, if only this year's E3 was narrated by Carson Kressley... :p

Other than that, I'm still waiting for Call of Duty: Total Warfare... That will surely change it up fo sure! :p

[1] HA! It spelled like the "Escape" key on a computer keyboard! *laughs til it hurts*

VinLAURiA:

gyrobot:
You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon.

Hey, don't drag us into this. Croshaw was born '83. It's him and the rest of you Gen-X '80s kids that have been the cynical, self-absorbed problem as far back as the early 2000s. All '90s kids ever wanted was to enjoy themselves without having to deal with '80s kids constantly bitching about sharing the attention and acting like a pack of pessimistic twits.

If he was born in 83, then he'd be 7 by the year 1990, 12 by the year 1995, and 17 by the year 2000. Considering the majority of his childhood would be spent in the 90s, I'd class that as a 90s kid.

Sheo_Dagana:

gyrobot:
You always need a professional source to cite from vs the extremely fickle audience you created Yahtzee. You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon. There is no "consistency" for a non professional reviewer who goes from minute of being the guy who sings your praise or the bitter man who sees nothing golden in life (One only needs to look at /v/ for the final product that Yahtzee made)

That audience was around a long time before Yahtzee was. I'm not sure if you know this or not, but there were people satirically reviewing games on the interwebs long before Yahtzee. I fail to see how he had a hand in creating an audience that's been around since internet forums existed. The heaviest amount of influence I've seen Yahtzee have on the gaming community is that he coined the term PC Master Race. Occasionally he pisses off overly sensitive Nintendrones.

If a jaded gaming community exists, it's the industry's fault. Negativity generated by reviewers is merely a symptom, because people wouldn't agree if they didn't also feel that way. Companies get caught miming playthroughs, bullshitting us on graphics, and announcing sequels/reboots to fuel the hype train and get preorders basically every year. Announcements are fine and all, but watching a man stand up one stage for an hour and try to sell us stuff like he's Peter Molyneux's understudy is boring as shit when I can just go to YouTube and see what matters - the announcement trailers - right there on the front page.

It's a cool event for the press, since they get to play the demos and all, but people have been cooling off on E3 ever since they closed their doors to the general public.

Yahtzee's brand of cynicism passed on to the press itself. During the 90s the industry was stoked on how awesome the upcoming game is. No political grandstanding or bitter cynical grumps. It was mostly a time for the press to just enjoy themselves and pass on that positivr energy to gamers. Nowadays we do nothing but stay guarded in our bolthole. Weary of strangers, liars and looters and an active perchant to shoot anyone fitting of the description. Top that with the recent takeover of the turtleneck triad in the press and all we hve is a bunch of unhappy gamers who have to rely on guerilla Radio to get their fix.

And Japan hates that Guerilla Radio and actively jams all transmition attempts.

Tl;dr. The professional rags used to be hyper positive. Now they are cynical fucks with an agenda

Well, i usually try to stay cautiously optimistic about games and not involve myself in every meaningless shitstorm over some tiny in-game feature/publisher politics/reviews etc.
And that's why i LIKE E3. Because during these two or three days a year i, together with other people, can just spill out all my witheld salt and make fun of every slip that happens to publishers on these conferences. It's catharctic.

gyrobot:

Tl;dr. The professional rags used to be hyper positive. Now they are cynical fucks with an agenda

I perfer that to hyper-positive with an agenda, frankly. Especially in an age when it's difficult to tell what's an article(sorry, sponsored content) and what's an ad.

As others have said, it's hard to be optimistic about an industry that will gladly sell pre-orders for games that release in a broken/uncompleted state, sometimes not be fixed for months(if at all) and review embargo said games so there's no way to know if there are problems until after the game drops.

There was also that time where GTA 5 went to a 50% discount on steam...and somehow stayed the exact same price, because it turns out they raised the price by the same amount in an attempt to sucker people. Yeah, fuck you too Rockstar. Guess what game I will never purchase now?

Not to mention the whole "Well, you bought the game now, but you'll have to buy the 5 DLC over the next year or so to really get the full experience, or have something actually worth playing". Which makes it hard to want to even bother buying until the "Complete" or "GOTY" edition drops.

When companies stop doing that shit, I'll stop being cynical.

Sheo_Dagana:

gyrobot:
You always need a professional source to cite from vs the extremely fickle audience you created Yahtzee. You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon. There is no "consistency" for a non professional reviewer who goes from minute of being the guy who sings your praise or the bitter man who sees nothing golden in life (One only needs to look at /v/ for the final product that Yahtzee made)

That audience was around a long time before Yahtzee was. I'm not sure if you know this or not, but there were people satirically reviewing games on the interwebs long before Yahtzee. I fail to see how he had a hand in creating an audience that's been around since internet forums existed. The heaviest amount of influence I've seen Yahtzee have on the gaming community is that he coined the term PC Master Race. Occasionally he pisses off overly sensitive Nintendrones.

If a jaded gaming community exists, it's the industry's fault. Negativity generated by reviewers is merely a symptom, because people wouldn't agree if they didn't also feel that way. Companies get caught miming playthroughs, bullshitting us on graphics, and announcing sequels/reboots to fuel the hype train and get preorders basically every year. Announcements are fine and all, but watching a man stand up one stage for an hour and try to sell us stuff like he's Peter Molyneux's understudy is boring as shit when I can just go to YouTube and see what matters - the announcement trailers - right there on the front page.

It's a cool event for the press, since they get to play the demos and all, but people have been cooling off on E3 ever since they closed their doors to the general public.

E3 was actually never open to the public, but in the past a lot of people managed to sneak their way in by claiming to be journalists of some sort, and the ESA started vetting people more carefully to make sure they were "real" journalists and not just some blogger(though these days it's getting harder to tell the difference).

And in that case, unless you are part of the media empire run by Ziff Davis or something similar, you aren't getting in. That means a lot of non press endored journalists are basically kept out and you get a who's who is relevant to the PR teams with showcases at E3.

gyrobot:

Sheo_Dagana:

gyrobot:
You always need a professional source to cite from vs the extremely fickle audience you created Yahtzee. You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon. There is no "consistency" for a non professional reviewer who goes from minute of being the guy who sings your praise or the bitter man who sees nothing golden in life (One only needs to look at /v/ for the final product that Yahtzee made)

That audience was around a long time before Yahtzee was. I'm not sure if you know this or not, but there were people satirically reviewing games on the interwebs long before Yahtzee. I fail to see how he had a hand in creating an audience that's been around since internet forums existed. The heaviest amount of influence I've seen Yahtzee have on the gaming community is that he coined the term PC Master Race. Occasionally he pisses off overly sensitive Nintendrones.

If a jaded gaming community exists, it's the industry's fault. Negativity generated by reviewers is merely a symptom, because people wouldn't agree if they didn't also feel that way. Companies get caught miming playthroughs, bullshitting us on graphics, and announcing sequels/reboots to fuel the hype train and get preorders basically every year. Announcements are fine and all, but watching a man stand up one stage for an hour and try to sell us stuff like he's Peter Molyneux's understudy is boring as shit when I can just go to YouTube and see what matters - the announcement trailers - right there on the front page.

It's a cool event for the press, since they get to play the demos and all, but people have been cooling off on E3 ever since they closed their doors to the general public.

Yahtzee's brand of cynicism passed on to the press itself. During the 90s the industry was stoked on how awesome the upcoming game is. No political grandstanding or bitter cynical grumps. It was mostly a time for the press to just enjoy themselves and pass on that positivr energy to gamers. Nowadays we do nothing but stay guarded in our bolthole. Weary of strangers, liars and looters and an active perchant to shoot anyone fitting of the description. Top that with the recent takeover of the turtleneck triad in the press and all we hve is a bunch of unhappy gamers who have to rely on guerilla Radio to get their fix.

And Japan hates that Guerilla Radio and actively jams all transmition attempts.

Tl;dr. The professional rags used to be hyper positive. Now they are cynical fucks with an agenda

You condemn '90s nostalgia in your original post, yet you seem to have more than a touch of it yourself, talking about how awesome it was and how pumped people got for new games back then. So what? A lot of those articles had no choice but to be upbeat because you couldn't say what you actually wanted to say because doing so would get you fired. Why do you think so many people have gone to YouTube in this day and age? Back then all we had was X-Play if we wanted honesty, but even Adam Sessler (before Yahtzee's time, wouldn't ya know) quit covering games after a decade and a half out of sheer frustration of the bullshit that is pervasive throughout the industry.

If gamers have to be on the look out for liars and looters it's because they have no choice; you never know when a game is going to get scaled back from what was shown at E3 or even if it will be shipped as a completed product. Assassin's Creed Unity? Watchdogs? The Evil Within turned out completely different. Or how about the crowd-funded Mighty No.9? And those are recent fiascos, and just a couple of examples, to say nothing of DLC or microtransactions. Companies have gotten greedy, and if I'm cynical, it's because I have to read shit like how the Final Fantasy 7 Remake episodes will be sold as full price games.

Again, Yahtzee didn't 'start the fire' so to say. I refer you to my earlier statement about the pessimism being a symptom. Instead of complaining about their cynicism, instead ask why they're so embittered. If all you want is overly positive gaming personalities, then I suggest you check out the Playstation Access guys.

TL;DR: Those 'hyper positive' individuals didn't get to being cynical fucks for no reason.

Yahtzee Croshaw:
We watch the show with a riff track to break the awkward tension and assure ourselves that we haven't been taken in. As for whether we have or not, that remains to be seen; we'll need to see how this year's announced games do with the buying public.

Well no, we really won't, because as said just a paragraph earlier:

the consumer gleans zero benefit from being informed about a game that they can't currently buy, in some cases not for years

No-one remembers what happened several years earlier in the first announcement that game is going to happen. Even for games that might come out in the next year or two there will be a huge advertising push with probably hundreds of separate items put out over the course of months at the least. This is really the biggest problem with E3; it's simply irrelevant. Any announcement is simply one tiny drop in the advertising ocean, and by the time anyone is able to actually act on it and buy something, they'll have forgotten it ever existed.

Sheo_Dagana:

gyrobot:
snip

snip

I think gyrobot is just expresing this observation about mainstream media.


But let's not pretend it's just the reviewers who changed. Different games, different industry, different means of communication and different audience.

We keep it around so we can know who won.

CaitSeith:

Sheo_Dagana:

gyrobot:
snip

snip

I think gyrobot is just expresing this observation about mainstream media.


But let's not pretend it's just the reviewers who changed. Different games, different industry, different means of communication and different audience.

If you are a weeb the third panel hits harder than ever. What with your games losing points just because your characters look like a skyrim modder's fantasied follower but slightly more modest and have more soul beyond kill me now. Or the reviews from Polygon and Killscreen which inputs social commentary into their reviews.

gyrobot:

CaitSeith:

Sheo_Dagana:

snip

I think gyrobot is just expresing this observation about mainstream media.


But let's not pretend it's just the reviewers who changed. Different games, different industry, different means of communication and different audience.

If you are a weeb the third panel hits harder than ever. What with your games losing points just because your characters look like a skyrim modder's fantasied follower but slightly more modest and have more soul beyond kill me now. Or the reviews from Polygon and Killscreen which inputs social commentary into their reviews.

What about all the other reviewers and sites that DON'T do it? Why no one mentions them? It's way easier to make the professionals you support more relevant than to change the behavior of reviewers whose approach you disagree with.

It cost Pete Davison his job at USGamer if it is any indication. The big ones have an agenda or has stopped reviewing games from certain companies.

For those Americans who think Yahtzee must be exaggerating about the Eurovision Song Contest, he is not. It really is a nation popularity contest, pretending less and less about the music, and the UK will get hammered in the next one.

Gaming is mainstream, that's all there is to it. As it grew, it lured in the biggest investors who set down rules for marketing, psychology and development, from there they made sure to have as many people in their pocket as possible.

E3 is just a mix of businesses, with everyone keeping up a facade and covering their own ass.
"Did you get to go to E3? Oh wow, you must be lucky!" You can hear youtubers, bloggers and other pundits spout stupid shit like that, giving people the idea that it's some sort of mecca where you can be graced by the gods of gaming. The reality is that developers and the suits behind them, should be shivering in their boots every time E3 came around, for fear that their games wouldn't match the standards of what games should be.

You know, I happen to like it. For about three or four days a year, I get all the news, trailers and announcements of the year compressed for easier consumption. Now that the conferences dedicate some not trivial amount of time to indie games, it gets closer to being all encompassing.

It beats having to look at youtube channels, RSS feeds or the escapist news portlet to see if some 10 seconds new footage of Mass Effect 4 was leaked.

gyrobot:

TL:DR: E3 offers consistency.

Not really. Publishers, even the large ones, don't always show up to the show. At times, upcoming major releases are completely absent. Likewise, far too often what's shown at E3 winds up being nothing more than a misleading vertical slice of the final product. *see: Watch Dogs, Evolve, A:CM, etc.

Not that I don't agree that E3, even today, has a place. (an ever diminishing place, but a place nonetheless) But "consistency" is not the reason for it.

Solkard:
We keep it around so we can know who won.

This. After all, how will I know if I made the right choice in purchasing that game/system/device unless the company that made it 'won' their battle against 'that other company'?

E3 really has become mostly redundant to today's super fast internet (and I mean both the bandwidth and how word spreads so quickly today). Those demos can be sent to game publications for review, and if the pub/dev wanted someone there with the previewer to answer questions, a skype call can be made. Press conferences can be streamed, and forums and email addresses open only to the press can be made to answer questions and conduct interviews. New hardware to test out and hype/publicity are the only major reasons to spend money sending reps and journalists to meet at video game trade shows. Having a person at a physical location makes them, and their readers/viewers, more emotionally invested in what they are trying out. That's what keeps these expensive trade shows alive and huge.

I was sort of sad when they almost killed E3 a few years ago, but I now I see that would have been for the best. It has become a dick waving competition between the major publishers, with all of those "who won E3 articles and videos pumped out every year" and the swag distributed to journalists to subconsciously sway their opinion on both the games and "who won." It was always a hype machine, though. The attempt at hyping everything on display at E3 has just gotten bigger when the constant news updates on the internet started to compete with trade shows.

It would be nice if game companies focused their PR more on the internet, but there is still a benefit to them in investing the money and effort they currently do into trade shows. I sure would rather see major news usually given at E3 spread more evenly throughout the year. The news for the weeks afterwards are always slow, and the many of the debates about what game or presentation was better can quickly undermine the point of being shown a preview of a product.

Vigormortis:
This. After all, how will I know if I made the right choice in purchasing that game/system/device unless the company that made it 'won' their battle against 'that other company'?

More importantly, how can you brag about how much smarter (and sexier) you are than the people who bought something from "that other company"?

The Rogue Wolf:

Vigormortis:
This. After all, how will I know if I made the right choice in purchasing that game/system/device unless the company that made it 'won' their battle against 'that other company'?

More importantly, how can you brag about how much smarter (and sexier) you are than the people who bought something from "that other company"?

Exactly.

My life has no meaning or validation unless I'm throwing my hard-earned money at the company that "won" some contest against another company.

E3 isn't for gamers, or general consumers? It's like the Cannes film festival. It's an Electronic and Entertainment Expo. It's where people in the industry get together to see who is selling what and make deals. It used to be the place where stores like Walmart, GAME, GameStop, etc. would decide how many units of certain products they are going to order for their stores. It's also where developers, studios, publishers etc. meet up in back rooms to discuss deals. Again, not for the average joe/jane gamer.

But like Cannes, Fashion Weeks, and other trade shows journalists go along to get an early scoop on what the industry has got in store. The presentations were for buyers to get them pumped about a product and order more units. But because journalists reported it to the general consumer, and created a marketing opportunity, the whole thing has been skewed towards the general public. It's now a bastardised event. The deals are still made, the store buyers are still there, but a large proportion is media baiting.

It is what it is, if people lost interest there'd still be an E3 trade show for people to do business, just not as grandiose.

Kibeth41:

VinLAURiA:

gyrobot:
You had a hand in creating an completely jaded and bitter audience who either stick to their 90's nostalgia or join some political movement that uses game reviews as a bludgeon.

Hey, don't drag us into this. Croshaw was born '83. It's him and the rest of you Gen-X '80s kids that have been the cynical, self-absorbed problem as far back as the early 2000s. All '90s kids ever wanted was to enjoy themselves without having to deal with '80s kids constantly bitching about sharing the attention and acting like a pack of pessimistic twits.

If he was born in 83, then he'd be 7 by the year 1990, 12 by the year 1995, and 17 by the year 2000. Considering the majority of his childhood would be spent in the 90s, I'd class that as a 90s kid.

HOLY SHITBISCUITS! He's just a year older than me?! Now I really feel like a bum.

Why are we so cynical? Because back in the day, the industry actually delivered sometimes. I think that's seriously about it. Nowadays, outside of the indie circle, all I see is mediocrity and the same ideas getting used over and over and OVER again.

 

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