It's Hard to Get Nostalgic About Games You Didn't Grow Up On

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It's Hard to Get Nostalgic About Games You Didn't Grow Up On

HD remakes that appeal to MY nostalgic memories are few and far between.

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The first game I ever played was Super Mario 3 (technically Super Mario All Stars, but close enough) on my friend's (S)NES. The first game I got on a computer was Commander Keen. By your logic classic platformers should be closest to my heart, and I'll have to admit it's fairly close to truth.

I don't know whether I'd be too stuck in my comfort zone, though, despite playing Nintendo a lot more than any other console. Maybe the first Playstation.

Maybe people who played a lot of Sonic the Hedgehog now show an above average propensity to molest dogs

Ahahahahhaahahahaha, wooooow.

Fuck you, Yahtzee.

I never owned a console until I was eleven so I played games mostly at friend's houses, which I recall enjoying but none actually stick out to me, and when I did get a DS I didn't actually have any idea of what was good so got what was popular or what was bought for me. The games which stand out as influences to my tastes today are a somewhat odd selection:

Professor Layton and the Curious Village - Was bought for me, and expected to find it dull. It's actually brilliant, and completely fantastically bonkers. Thus, it makes me very sad that the last two Layton games have been crap.

Pokemon Diamond - It's Pokemon. It's also, in my opinion, the best the series has to offer. Even once I'd done everything, I made my own fun by crossing the map top to bottom, or west to east.

Halo 3 - I formed lasting friendships playing local multiplayer deathmatches. Firing up Halo 3 is usually still what happens when we're at a loose end on a night in.

Dragon Quest IX - The first JRPG I ever played. I sank upwards of 300 hours into this game. What happens in Coffinwell has particularly stuck with me.

NES in Dec. 1989, Gameboy when it came out, SNES when it came out. PC 1996. XBOX when it came out (own money starting with this one), NGC when it came out, Wii when it came out (for my parents), XBOX 360 when it came out and PS3 in 2008. And of course constant Master Race PC upgradez.

Oh, I forget a PS1 a year after PS2 came out. And I bought a PS2 two years ago. I even got Spiderman 2 on it!!! ^_^

That's some DNA all right! Now start working on that dating site based on it! :D

In the meantime I'll see if I can make the time to play all those PS2 classics I got 2nd hand (Godhand, Silent Hill 2, 3 4 special editions, Shadow of the Colossus etc. etc.)...

I think my preference to own physical copies of cartridge games came from the feeling of loss associated with returning a good game to the rental store as a child.

Childhood nostalgia is overrated, probably. What's left of the fading images anyway. All i remember is the smell of cut grass, vodka and my first girlfriend's perfume. If they can make a HD remake of that, i will admittedly be impressed.

Is this a thing that needed to be mentioned? I thought it stood to reason that one could only get nostalgic about remakes of games that one had indeed played in the past!

Xsjadoblayde:
Childhood nostalgia is overrated, probably. What's left of the fading images anyway. All i remember is the smell of cut grass, vodka and my first girlfriend's perfume. If they can make a HD remake of that, i will admittedly be impressed.

Do female bears wear perfume? Do they actually buy that stuff? Or do they meander into department stores in the dead of night and rub themselves against the shelves?

POKE 53280,0
POKE 53281,0
LOAD "*",8,1

...Yeah, I had a Commodore 64.

Given the inordinate amount of time I spent waiting for things to load in my youth, perhaps it's surprising how little patience I have for the wave of "Roguelikes" that don't seem to care if they've wasted an hour randomly generating a world in which you simply can't win.

My formative years may also have something to do with my unease with Windows hiding an increasing number of functions away where your naughty fingers won't burn themselves, and championing "ease of use" and big clunky icons that do all the things your dad wants to do while making functions that used to be at your fingertips hide five levels into nested menus, assuming they survive at all.

But I will say that all that time with Garry Kitchen's Gamemaker and SEUCK (Shoot-Em-Up-Construction-Kit, for the uninitiated) did contribute to my own lifelong fascination with game creation.

Silverbeard:

Do female bears wear perfume? Do they actually buy that stuff? Or do they meander into department stores in the dead of night and rub themselves against the shelves?

The upper class ones do. But little do they know it's made from their ancestor's various parts. The average bears just drunkenly knock over the J-lo brands and drink the lot. Where they get the booze from is anyone's guess. Probably that jaded ex-circus bear that stares longingly into the distance midway through every damn conversation.

Case in point: Pok?mon GO.

And yeah, growing up loading off tapes for my ZX Spectrum and Amstrad CPC6128 has given me a lot more patience than most of the customers I deal with at work these days, who think their computer is terminally broken if there's a half second between them furiously clicking on something and getting a response.

Xsjadoblayde:

The upper class ones do. But little do they know it's made from their ancestor's various parts. The average bears just drunkenly knock over the J-lo brands and drink the lot. Where they get the booze from is anyone's guess. Probably that jaded ex-circus bear that stares longingly into the distance midway through every damn conversation.

Ah well, who can blame him? Diving through flaming hoops will give anyone a thousand-yard stare.

Rayman has stolen my gaming nostalgia, which I am not okay with that and I'm okay with that! (Sorry, Lemmings!)

Other than that, playing classic games [that I've never played beforehand] always feel like I'm one of those outsiders trying to figure out why video games are [still] popular...

Getting a little tired of the "all Sonic fans are creepy perverts" joke, but otherwise a good article.

I personally didn't start playing PC games until the late 2000s when I finally got my own computer(before then I used the family's computer in the living room) and I mostly played ports of sixth-generation titles like True Crime: New York City, Driv3r, 25 to Life, Narc, Miami Vice, Driver: Parallel Lines, Obscure, Obscure: Aftermath, Cold Fear, etc

Before that though I had a Genesis, and as much as people love to say that retro gaming is better then modern gaming(which I don't agree with one bit), there was a ton of shovelware on that system, there were definitely more bad titles on retro systems then on modern ones. Now it seems like most of the really shitty games are relegated to Steam.

Callate:
POKE 53280,0
POKE 53281,0
LOAD "*",8,1

...Yeah, I had a Commodore 64.

Shouldn't you be in an old folks home gumming your food? Please grandpa, tell us the story of how Commodore ruined Amiga again!

I also grew up with the Commodore 64 and Amiga as gaming machines. But my first videogames I played were on the ColecoVision and the Atari 2600 (I even played the infamous E.T. when I was too young to know how to tell good games from bad ones). I played lots of old computer games like Shadow of the Beast, several LucasArts games, KULT: The Temple of Flying Saucers (aka Chamber of the Sci-Mutant Priestess), Zaxxon, Forbidden Forest, Dan Dare, Archon, Q*Bert, Contra, Giana Sisters, Lemmings, Strider, It Came From the Desert, Summer Games, Winter Games, California Games, Caveman Ugh-lympics, Everest Ascent, Karateka, Prince of Persia, Out of this World (aka Outer World), etc.; but also tasted the licensed games back then too with Predator, Barbie, Hot Wheels, Duck Tales, Superman, Batman, Transformers (both games), Frankie Goes to Hollywood (I never understood what that game was about) and an Aliens game for C64 that still is better than Aliens: CM.

Later I got a NES because Super Mario Bros. blew my mind. But I always had a foot on PC gaming, later moving to DOS games (where I even played a survival horror game from the same studio of the old Shadow of the Beast) and eventually Windows games.

Grew up playing games on a GBC, GBA, GameCube, and Windows 98/XP. In my second year of middle school I became a pirate (First two games were Halo:CE and Sonic Heroes), found out emulators exist, and got a DS (And a Wii a few years later). Four years ago, Wii was stolen. Three years ago, quit my pirating days and have been very extensive on legally collecting games. Today, still carrying that on, but I'm also more focused, and excited, about collecting older titles as opposed to newer ones.

Games I remember very fondly of are Pok?mon Gold, The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons, The Mummy (GBC), Bomberman Tournament, Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga, Star Fox Adventures, Bionicle (GC), Sonic Adventure, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (GC), Atlantis: Search for the Journal, After Dark Games, 3D Ultra Traintown, 3D Ultra Pinball, 3D Ultra Minigolf, SimCoaster, Sim Theme Park, and Island Xtreme Stunts.

There's also a number of titles I remember renting from Blockbuster and Hollywood Video, but, since I didn't own them back then, I decided not to include them.

So, does that provide enough for a psych profile?

I grew up with a Gamecube, so I keep seeing people rave about the games they loved to play on the N64. I fail to see a lot of the appeal outside of nostalgia most of the time.
I actually used to have a lot of nostalgia for childhood games. It got completely destroyed when I found out most of those games were absolute trash and my young self had no sense for good purchases. The only game I can say I have some semblance of strong nostalgia for is Super Mario Sunshine, and that's only because it's still good.

What I get the most flak about is not being able to have any interest at all in Ocarina of Time. No matter how much people talk about it, I just fail to see how it any better than Majora's Mask. Again, I grew up on the Gamecube, so even seeing the graphical quality of the game is a bit of a turn-off. I could tolerate Majora's Mask or Mario 64 just fine, but I can't bear to watch trying to walk through the town that is just a giant, blurry, distorted photo warping my idea of perspective.
No, I don't care if the game was awesome when it was first released, give me a reason to play it today over another, more recently released game.

RealRT:

Maybe people who played a lot of Sonic the Hedgehog now show an above average propensity to molest dogs

Ahahahahhaahahahaha, wooooow.

Fuck you, Yahtzee.

Yahtzee's a dog?

vic 20 (or so I'm told)
486
pentium 2
something with vista
ps2
an intergrated graphics card running 7

I feel like my geneology is particularly sparse and cryptic. Regarding the games, I had a bunch of demo discs and shareware discs, and my parents didn't seem to mind me playing things I shouldn't have. As a result, I have something like 100 games I played as a kid, and I don't think I got the same impression of them as their target audiences. To give some examples:

The Duke Nukem trilogy (3d might've probably more exciting after puberty...), Leisure Suit Larry (ditto), ZZT, Putt-Putt, MS-Paint (what do you mean it's not a game?), P-Robots, Elfland, Willy the Worm, Time Commando, World Empire Deluxe 2 (which gave me a boost in geography), Raptor, [rest abridged for space]

I also can state with certainty that I was stupid as a kid, having played most of the games again as an adult. Also, I rejected windows 3.1 when it came out in favor of dos shell and windows 95 in favor of a straight command prompt, despite being a little kid.

The idea of gaming DNA site amuses me. Why not, I heard of worst concepts.

Any gamer grrls who went sega master system->Super nintendo->Master system->Ps1->Game boy->Ps2->Pc with low self esteem and daddy issues? Start the line here ladiez, guaranteed to get back at your parents or your money back!

Nuuu:
I grew up with a Gamecube, so I keep seeing people rave about the games they loved to play on the N64. I fail to see a lot of the appeal outside of nostalgia most of the time.
I actually used to have a lot of nostalgia for childhood games. It got completely destroyed when I found out most of those games were absolute trash and my young self had no sense for good purchases. The only game I can say I have some semblance of strong nostalgia for is Super Mario Sunshine, and that's only because it's still good.

What I get the most flak about is not being able to have any interest at all in Ocarina of Time. No matter how much people talk about it, I just fail to see how it any better than Majora's Mask. Again, I grew up on the Gamecube, so even seeing the graphical quality of the game is a bit of a turn-off. I could tolerate Majora's Mask or Mario 64 just fine, but I can't bear to watch trying to walk through the town that is just a giant, blurry, distorted photo warping my idea of perspective.
No, I don't care if the game was awesome when it was first released, give me a reason to play it today over another, more recently released game.

To learn what made old good games memorable; so you can see from where the arguments come when people call a new game worse than those old ones (even when they are wrong)

Johnny Novgorod:

RealRT:

Maybe people who played a lot of Sonic the Hedgehog now show an above average propensity to molest dogs

Ahahahahhaahahahaha, wooooow.

Fuck you, Yahtzee.

Yahtzee's a dog?

Clearly got a brain of one.

The earliest games I can remember playing were on my best friend's Colecovision when I was 7 before my parents finally caved and bought us an NES. I also remember playing Oregon Trail and Number Munchers on the school's Apple ][e's.

I've been playing video games for about 30 years now. And I know I am absolutely blinded by nostalgia.
In the last years I've gotten more excited by the reworking of classics (like Monkey Island 1+2, Day of the Tentacle, Adventures of Mana) and the upcoming releases of 'Dragon Quest 7' and 'The Silver Case' than about 90% of what's been shown at E3.

I guess there are three factors in this:

- I'm not in the target group anymore. I don't care about military shooters, online play or MOBAS, so my interest in AAA games shrinks a bit each year.

- Pixel art/classic gameplay strikes a cord with me. I am fully aware that I'm biased in this, but I can't turn it off. For example: The latest 'Star Ocean' was panned because of being too rooted in the past, yet for me that's its biggest drawing point.
Games by Wadjet Eye? Godent!
Ouya? Weak console but amazing platform for retro games

- The SNES/PS1 eras were a time when I had to get through a lot of personal struggles, setbacks and illnesses with the consoles being a place of comfort.

While all of this may sound like I'm the sort of grumpy gamer who's lamenting days gone by, I enjoy plenty of current titles as well.

I remember when Pac-Man was new, and my first computer was a Color Computer 2, on which I played the best game ever. You may bow in my presence.

If he can't get Nostalgic about Nintendo then why does he talk up Mother for the NES like it was a piece of Art?

RealRT:

Maybe people who played a lot of Sonic the Hedgehog now show an above average propensity to molest dogs

Ahahahahhaahahahaha, wooooow.

Fuck you, Yahtzee.

TBH, that's probably more applicable to Starfox fans. Though I can also think of one popular Amiga fan with a propensity to molest a Tiger, or a Skunk, or both. So those living in Amiga houses shouldn't throw their 3.25" stones

I'm not even nostalgic for the games I grew up with. The Atari 2600 was fun when I was a small child, but it seems so primitive now, and repetition (a result of a cartridge's limited data capacity) just bores me. Likewise, you can keep all of those frustrating "three lives and you're done" side-scrolling Nintendo games. As for the early 3-D era, mindlessly jumping from platform to platform got really old by 1998, and kart games - complete with their cheap-ass, rubber-banding NPC "AI" - are the reason I despise racing games to this day.

Though I enjoy adventure games like the ones I played as a teenager (Monkey Island, Maniac Mansion, Quest For Glory, etc.) I shy away from them these days since they have no replay value. Figure out the puzzles once and that's it.

Despite playing video games since 1982, I never got hooked on a single one until Morrowind, and that's the type of game I love to this day. Add to that crazy stuff like Saints Row and Borderlands, and games with massive depth like Witcher 3. I have no interest in going back to the bare-bones crap days.

Mine would be:

PC -> PC -> Game Boy -> N64 -> PC -> PC -> PC -> PS3 -> PC -> PS2 -> PC -> PC -> PS4

So my DNA is mostly Pure Breed Master Race, interbred occasionally with Console Peasant. Looking at my genealogy now I can't feel comfortable at the PC Master Race rallies.

Oh the shame. What will Duke Pompousworth XVII say!

Didn't we have this discussion before? And by before I mean every time Yahtzee reviews a Mario game where he feels the need to remind us of the plumber's whole history and think of the future of the franchise rather than talking about the game, I dare you to find one review where that's not true.

Nostalgia is something tricky, Yahtzee's reaction to Mighty No. 9 would have been the same he would have to the original MegaMan because everything is there: the lives system, the tight platforming, the graphics, it doesn't appeal to him because he has an already built vision of how gaming immersion should be. Yahtzee's lack of appeal of both Mario and Sonic show he wasn't there when the video games shifted from 2D to 3D, something that blew the minds of any people who had grown up with those games.

But I think nostalgia is kind of holding us back, Mighty no. 9, Yooka-Laylee and Bloodstained all of them were under the promise that they were a familiar experience "adapted for a new generation", not having grown up with neither MegaMan, Banjo or Castlevania, I can safely say these people want to go back to comfort zone, even though they insist it's not nostalgia, even thought games like Ratchet & Clank, Mario Galaxy and the Witcher series respectively showed where the future of these genres were, people decided they want to go with something familiar. I mean Undertale was only funded because of the creator's history with Earthbound, it's clear that people do not know what they want, so nostalgia is alive as long as people know they can make profit out of it.

Igor-Rowan:
Didn't we have this discussion before? And by before I mean every time Yahtzee reviews a Mario game where he feels the need to remind us of the plumber's whole history and think of the future of the franchise rather than talking about the game, I dare you to find one review where that's not true.

Nostalgia is something tricky, Yahtzee's reaction to Mighty No. 9 would have been the same he would have to the original MegaMan because everything is there: the lives system, the tight platforming, the graphics, it doesn't appeal to him because he has an already built vision of how gaming immersion should be. Yahtzee's lack of appeal of both Mario and Sonic show he wasn't there when the video games shifted from 2D to 3D, something that blew the minds of any people who had grown up with those games.

But I think nostalgia is kind of holding us back, Mighty no. 9, Yooka-Laylee and Bloodstained all of them were under the promise that they were a familiar experience "adapted for a new generation", not having grown up with neither MegaMan, Banjo or Castlevania, I can safely say these people want to go back to comfort zone, even though they insist it's not nostalgia, even thought games like Ratchet & Clank, Mario Galaxy and the Witcher series respectively showed where the future of these genres were, people decided they want to go with something familiar. I mean Undertale was only funded because of the creator's history with Earthbound, it's clear that people do not know what they want, so nostalgia is alive as long as people know they can make profit out of it.

while the new games are a much better and consistent user experience overall (them old games have variable aging results), a hell of a lot of them could have saved themselves so much trouble if they had actually studied older game systems to find out how to avoid many common mistakes that i am sometimes embarrassed that they are still occurring in this day and age. sadly, most of the veterans who actually knew what they were doing retired a good while ago, and many of the ones that remained to attempt to recreate their legacy are sorely lacking, like inafune, and the guy they replaced the original starfox composer (pre 64) with. games have often lacked formal channels for apprenticeship and it shows as we continue to look to indies to pick up the slack where large studios have forgotten those lessons in the rush to modernize, although to them, it's probably more attractive to create new cash cows instead of spending money to refine or preserve older ones (unless they're remakes, but they then apply their new methodology to the old stuff and whoo boy mixed results).

bloodstained looks like it's coming along pretty good though, but perhaps another rare-ish collectathon in this day and age might be a bit dated.

No consoles were allowed in my house growing up, so I never have much of a nostalgia kick for Nintendo, Mario, Zelda, etc.

I only find myself nostalgic for my early pentium games, and it was around the seventh grade and after. I did have an NES before that, but none of those really sank in.
From early childhood I mostly remember reading books. Lots and lots of books. I wonder if those books are the reason I get irritated by games trying to tell stories. They're really bad at it and aren't meant to do it.

weirdee:

Igor-Rowan:
Didn't we have this discussion before? And by before I mean every time Yahtzee reviews a Mario game where he feels the need to remind us of the plumber's whole history and think of the future of the franchise rather than talking about the game, I dare you to find one review where that's not true.

Nostalgia is something tricky, Yahtzee's reaction to Mighty No. 9 would have been the same he would have to the original MegaMan because everything is there: the lives system, the tight platforming, the graphics, it doesn't appeal to him because he has an already built vision of how gaming immersion should be. Yahtzee's lack of appeal of both Mario and Sonic show he wasn't there when the video games shifted from 2D to 3D, something that blew the minds of any people who had grown up with those games.

But I think nostalgia is kind of holding us back, Mighty no. 9, Yooka-Laylee and Bloodstained all of them were under the promise that they were a familiar experience "adapted for a new generation", not having grown up with neither MegaMan, Banjo or Castlevania, I can safely say these people want to go back to comfort zone, even though they insist it's not nostalgia, even thought games like Ratchet & Clank, Mario Galaxy and the Witcher series respectively showed where the future of these genres were, people decided they want to go with something familiar. I mean Undertale was only funded because of the creator's history with Earthbound, it's clear that people do not know what they want, so nostalgia is alive as long as people know they can make profit out of it.

while the new games are a much better and consistent user experience overall (them old games have variable aging results), a hell of a lot of them could have saved themselves so much trouble if they had actually studied older game systems to find out how to avoid many common mistakes that i am sometimes embarrassed that they are still occurring in this day and age. sadly, most of the veterans who actually knew what they were doing retired a good while ago, and many of the ones that remained to attempt to recreate their legacy are sorely lacking, like inafune, and the guy they replaced the original starfox composer (pre 64) with. games have often lacked formal channels for apprenticeship and it shows as we continue to look to indies to pick up the slack where large studios have forgotten those lessons in the rush to modernize, although to them, it's probably more attractive to create new cash cows instead of spending money to refine or preserve older ones (unless they're remakes, but they then apply their new methodology to the old stuff and whoo boy mixed results).

bloodstained looks like it's coming along pretty good though, but perhaps another rare-ish collectathon in this day and age might be a bit dated.

So, to best summarize the whole nostalgia problem, there are two major factors causing it.

On the one end, you have companies continuously creating games, but nothing evolves beyond a certain point because (1) the original people involved with the project all left for various reasons and/or (2) the company decided that money could be better spent elsewhere since the general public is caring less about the actually gameplay part of a video game.

And, then, on the other end, you have smaller teams making games so people can relive their glory-days/childhood, and never plan on changing anything because of a twisted take on "Everything old is good, everything new is bad".

So, now that that is addressed, what can we do?

most of the teams making the "revival" games are old people already, so basically they're gonna make a modern record of their knowledge and then leave the picture when they retire, but many of these teams weren't the greats to begin with, so results vary

the innovation front now relies on new indies that grew up on old games, but know enough about games to avoid the mistakes of both of these worlds while still pulling from that background in a meaningful matter

this is opposed to people who simply wish to imitate success or create a barebones tribute, or people who want to capitalize on nostalgia or passing trends

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