Working For a Living

So does this mean you don't make enough money through Patreon or something?

Well keep laughing, hes the one dealing with the Black Friday crowd today.

"Atrocious consumerist shit hive" are four words I never considered putting together but four words that will now forever remain linked in my head as the only way to describe department stores

Integrity for dinner, with Pride for desert.

008Zulu:
Integrity for dinner, with Pride for desert.

Self-Loathing for breakfast. :^)

RJ 17:

008Zulu:
Integrity for dinner, with Pride for desert.

Self-Loathing for breakfast. :^)

With a side of crow somewhere along the way. Probably with pride.

This one made me laugh my arse off, I have to say.

Thing is, I'm not a creative or anything, I just fucking hate my job. There's always an argumenmt in my head, Gollum style:

"I can't believe we're doing this again. Find a better job."
"We will, let's just get this week done first."

Friday comes and it's straight down the pub for a weekend of drinking, laughing and forgetting.

Monday: "FUCK!"

I guess that's a warning more than anything.

Go back to the comics, Corey, so I have something to read while doing my hateful job.

Hey man, there are worse jobs than retail. He could be working fast food or telephone tech support.

Funny enough, you have to grind through small time jobs to get a high enough level for careers kappa :^)

In all seriousness, I understand what it feels. I was fortunate enough to never 'hate' any of my jobs, but there were days (especially on holidays) where customers made my life at work pretty horrible. That isn't to say the coworkers I had were immune to this bullcrap, but it seemed they had a good handle on things which motivated me to stay positive through the sluggish long days.

Meanwhile I laughed at the comic and the boy's response kek. Well done again.

Take it from a guy who used to make near $100k/year in network security, there's no dishonor in working retail at any point in life. Nor menial serving jobs, minimum wage, etc. So long as you're making any money and keeping roof overhead, food on the table and whatnot, its commendable.
I've actually quit my original profession (as mentioned above) both because finding a solid job was difficult as was finding one that properly compensated me for the stress of the work. Now I work for an Amazon Fulfillment Center, making less than I used to but happy and pursuing my own goals in the background. Plus I've got more time to spend with my daughter and potentially more time in the future because less stress = better health. ;)
But back to my original point, any job that keeps you alive and afloat is worth working, and there's always room in the future to find better jobs if you can't stand the one you work now.

Imperioratorex Caprae:
Take it from a guy who used to make near $100k/year in network security, there's no dishonor in working retail at any point in life. Nor menial serving jobs, minimum wage, etc. So long as you're making any money and keeping roof overhead, food on the table and whatnot, its commendable.
I've actually quit my original profession (as mentioned above) both because finding a solid job was difficult as was finding one that properly compensated me for the stress of the work. Now I work for an Amazon Fulfillment Center, making less than I used to but happy and pursuing my own goals in the background. Plus I've got more time to spend with my daughter and potentially more time in the future because less stress = better health. ;)
But back to my original point, any job that keeps you alive and afloat is worth working, and there's always room in the future to find better jobs if you can't stand the one you work now.

This means a lot to me, because I'm going full time at the grocery store I've worked part time at for the last six years, while I'm also toying with the idea of getting a masters in education, because being an English teacher is an idea I've been toying with for the last...*checks watch* twenty-six hours. I just have no freaking idea if that's a good idea, if I could really get invested in it (I KINDA do, but I've been going on and off about it and I can't do that in a classroom. "sorry kids, my passion dried up for the day") or if I could just handle the masters program. What I do know is that I know that grocery store well, the store manager is putting me through the slow but steady process of making me full time, and that I have a roof over my head for the foreseeable future, so I don't need to make a crazy amount of money anytime soon.

So thanks. It gave me a lot to think about. In a good way.

erttheking:

Imperioratorex Caprae:
Take it from a guy who used to make near $100k/year in network security, there's no dishonor in working retail at any point in life. Nor menial serving jobs, minimum wage, etc. So long as you're making any money and keeping roof overhead, food on the table and whatnot, its commendable.
I've actually quit my original profession (as mentioned above) both because finding a solid job was difficult as was finding one that properly compensated me for the stress of the work. Now I work for an Amazon Fulfillment Center, making less than I used to but happy and pursuing my own goals in the background. Plus I've got more time to spend with my daughter and potentially more time in the future because less stress = better health. ;)
But back to my original point, any job that keeps you alive and afloat is worth working, and there's always room in the future to find better jobs if you can't stand the one you work now.

This means a lot to me, because I'm going full time at the grocery store I've worked part time at for the last six years, while I'm also toying with the idea of getting a masters in education, because being an English teacher is an idea I've been toying with for the last...*checks watch* twenty-six hours. I just have no freaking idea if that's a good idea, if I could really get invested in it (I KINDA do, but I've been going on and off about it and I can't do that in a classroom. "sorry kids, my passion dried up for the day") or if I could just handle the masters program. What I do know is that I know that grocery store well, the store manager is putting me through the slow but steady process of making me full time, and that I have a roof over my head for the foreseeable future, so I don't need to make a crazy amount of money anytime soon.

So thanks. It gave me a lot to think about. In a good way.

Why don't you try out substitute teaching? I don't know if you live in America, but where I am literally anyone can get in the program, and you're able to work whenever you feel like it, which allows you to work it around your schedule. It'll give you a taste of what the work is like, and you may even make connections. More importantly it's pretty diverse. I've subbed in general special ed classes, middle school classes, and highschool classes. They're all quite different, so you may hate one and love another. I highly recommend it.

Also, I'm working on a Masters in Arts and teaching. I've already got my bachelors, and my current degree can be completed in about a year and a half to two years. It may be worth looking into.

I thought it went without saying these guys actually had jobs on the side?

Fox12:

erttheking:

Imperioratorex Caprae:
Take it from a guy who used to make near $100k/year in network security, there's no dishonor in working retail at any point in life. Nor menial serving jobs, minimum wage, etc. So long as you're making any money and keeping roof overhead, food on the table and whatnot, its commendable.
I've actually quit my original profession (as mentioned above) both because finding a solid job was difficult as was finding one that properly compensated me for the stress of the work. Now I work for an Amazon Fulfillment Center, making less than I used to but happy and pursuing my own goals in the background. Plus I've got more time to spend with my daughter and potentially more time in the future because less stress = better health. ;)
But back to my original point, any job that keeps you alive and afloat is worth working, and there's always room in the future to find better jobs if you can't stand the one you work now.

This means a lot to me, because I'm going full time at the grocery store I've worked part time at for the last six years, while I'm also toying with the idea of getting a masters in education, because being an English teacher is an idea I've been toying with for the last...*checks watch* twenty-six hours. I just have no freaking idea if that's a good idea, if I could really get invested in it (I KINDA do, but I've been going on and off about it and I can't do that in a classroom. "sorry kids, my passion dried up for the day") or if I could just handle the masters program. What I do know is that I know that grocery store well, the store manager is putting me through the slow but steady process of making me full time, and that I have a roof over my head for the foreseeable future, so I don't need to make a crazy amount of money anytime soon.

So thanks. It gave me a lot to think about. In a good way.

Why don't you try out substitute teaching? I don't know if you live in America, but where I am literally anyone can get in the program, and you're able to work whenever you feel like it, which allows you to work it around your schedule. It'll give you a taste of what the work is like, and you may even make connections. More importantly it's pretty diverse. I've subbed in general special ed classes, middle school classes, and highschool classes. They're all quite different, so you may hate one and love another. I highly recommend it.

Also, I'm working on a Masters in Arts and teaching. I've already got my bachelors, and my current degree can be completed in about a year and a half to two years. It may be worth looking into.

I've that that recommended to me a couple of times. Like I said, I only came to this realization a couple of days ago, so I'm trying to get my emotions together before I try that out. Also I'm probably going to be talking to students who are already enrolled in my local masters program and seeing what the program is like.

I don't know, I'm working through a lot of things right now.

No shame in working retail, not that I ever have, but my wife has for her whole career. Me? I am in one of the precious few industry positions where if someone disrespects me, I can tell them to go fuck themselves and not be fired. Anyone who's a big enough ass to disrespect me or my staff is going to be on the bad end of an ass-chewing.

Jacked Assassin:
So does this mean you don't make enough money through Patreon or something?

Fuck no; they don't even manage to make their monthly goal of $900. Which, remember, is meant to support both of them. If that were a normal 9-to-5 job, this would work out to eleven cents an hour per person. They currently make $742 a month, so it's nine-and-a-half cents an hour per person. Either way, it basically pays as much as unemployment benefits. They clearly aren't continuing to do this out of anything but passion by this point.

gigastar:
Well keep laughing, hes the one dealing with the Black Friday crowd today.

Dear God! Did Cory survive!?

erttheking:

Fox12:

erttheking:

This means a lot to me, because I'm going full time at the grocery store I've worked part time at for the last six years, while I'm also toying with the idea of getting a masters in education, because being an English teacher is an idea I've been toying with for the last...*checks watch* twenty-six hours. I just have no freaking idea if that's a good idea, if I could really get invested in it (I KINDA do, but I've been going on and off about it and I can't do that in a classroom. "sorry kids, my passion dried up for the day") or if I could just handle the masters program. What I do know is that I know that grocery store well, the store manager is putting me through the slow but steady process of making me full time, and that I have a roof over my head for the foreseeable future, so I don't need to make a crazy amount of money anytime soon.

So thanks. It gave me a lot to think about. In a good way.

Why don't you try out substitute teaching? I don't know if you live in America, but where I am literally anyone can get in the program, and you're able to work whenever you feel like it, which allows you to work it around your schedule. It'll give you a taste of what the work is like, and you may even make connections. More importantly it's pretty diverse. I've subbed in general special ed classes, middle school classes, and highschool classes. They're all quite different, so you may hate one and love another. I highly recommend it.

Also, I'm working on a Masters in Arts and teaching. I've already got my bachelors, and my current degree can be completed in about a year and a half to two years. It may be worth looking into.

I've that that recommended to me a couple of times. Like I said, I only came to this realization a couple of days ago, so I'm trying to get my emotions together before I try that out. Also I'm probably going to be talking to students who are already enrolled in my local masters program and seeing what the program is like.

I don't know, I'm working through a lot of things right now.

Well, no pressure. I definitely recommend trying out grade school, middle school, high school, and special ed before you actually apply, though. There's also a deadline for applying to substitute teaching where I am, so I highly recommend finding out when that is. It's early December where I am. You can get certified in one afternoon, and start whenever you want. There's usually just a one page application you have to fill out. You can probably get it online or at any local school. Otherwise you may have to wait a semester before you can try it out. And, if you change your mind, you can always just stop. There's no obligation for subbing. If you have any questions about what my program is like, feel free to ask. Again, I don't know where you live, so it may be a little different, but I'll try to answer any questions you have.

His meals remind me of mine... :/

Student life!

As someone who makes their money from this consumerist wage slavery and globalization ... Corey is making the right decision. All of you should be working in the global human beehive. Buzz buzz buzz buzz.

Did I sell it?

Honestly, there's no shame in doing menial labour. Someone has got to do it, and by the laws of basic economics most people can never have a decent job (and by decent I mean one where you will feel like you're contributing to longterm economic success for yourself and those you care for). Being a creative often doesn't help you be happy with what are admittedly pisspoor things we need to do to survive. Then again, you can always treat it as nightmare fuel to aid your creativity...

Imperioratorex Caprae:
Take it from a guy who used to make near $100k/year in network security, there's no dishonor in working retail at any point in life. Nor menial serving jobs, minimum wage, etc. So long as you're making any money and keeping roof overhead, food on the table and whatnot, its commendable.
I've actually quit my original profession (as mentioned above) both because finding a solid job was difficult as was finding one that properly compensated me for the stress of the work. Now I work for an Amazon Fulfillment Center, making less than I used to but happy and pursuing my own goals in the background. Plus I've got more time to spend with my daughter and potentially more time in the future because less stress = better health. ;)
But back to my original point, any job that keeps you alive and afloat is worth working, and there's always room in the future to find better jobs if you can't stand the one you work now.

How the hell were you earning roughly 100k a year for a while and then still working? Were you renting in Silicon Valley? Are we talking before or after tax? If after, surely that was your first mistake.

HumanShale:
This one made me laugh my arse off, I have to say.

Thing is, I'm not a creative or anything, I just fucking hate my job. There's always an argumenmt in my head, Gollum style:

"I can't believe we're doing this again. Find a better job."
"We will, let's just get this week done first."

Friday comes and it's straight down the pub for a weekend of drinking, laughing and forgetting.

Monday: "FUCK!"

I guess that's a warning more than anything.

Go back to the comics, Corey, so I have something to read while doing my hateful job.

You don't wait until the weekend to put in applications. You do it during the week, with the idea of going into work tomorrow motivating you.

 

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