Appropriating Culture

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Appropriating Culture

Yes, it is time to pinch our noses once again, as we are descending back into outrage culture.

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So, to sum up simply: Whiny self absorbed twat muffins can't leave their stupid comments in their pocket, and outrage by people who have nothing to do with anything affecting anything else make a big deal out of nothing.

Meanwhile, the sky is blue. (Good article by the way)

This is one of those odd subjects that is difficult to come down on one side of. On one hand its easy to come down against it since its so easy for someone to just take the base trappings of a culture and use them for a look or something without having any understanding of the culture. On the other, what culture is so special that it can only be enjoyed by one group, I mean saying that just because someone isn't born into a certain culture, they can't still become part of it is pretty arrogant.

I think one of the reasons this tends to happen in the US is cause we don't really have a big obvious underlying culture. Since we are a melting pot we tend to take a lot of cultures so people can take parts of any other culture they see around and become part of it. A lot of countries seem more mono-culture than multi-culture.

I'll quote this thing I wrote on Tumblr a while back:

Ignorance is saying that we mustn't eat foreign food because "that's cultural appropriation!"

Knowledge is saying that it's fine to eat foreign food, because that doesn't actually constitute cultural appropriation at all.

Wisdom is saying that even if eating foreign food had constituted cultural appropriation, it'd be okay to do, because there are limits, people. There are limits.

People that try and shame others for cultural appropriation are merely cultural segregationists. That disturbed sociopath who attacked the white college student for having dreadlocks due to "appropriation" was actually a racist trying to stymie cultural integration.

It always amuses me what issues people higher on the Maslow scale can come up with.

Oh lord, now what...

Oh what a surprise. Hapened at a university again. This will certainly be relevant to my life, I'm sure. *eyeroll*

Well, no shocker here. University people do something stupid university policy related, and I'm supposed to act like it's the left wing PC death squads coming to get me. Been hearing this wolf cry for 5 or 6 years now, and it's still not changed my situation one bit.

I'm really going to be happy when people keep trying to insist that insulated dumbass university people are more relevant to my life than the people running my town and county.

There's one part at the end that standing out to me.

**Whether something is offensive is determined by those who are on the receiving end, not by uninvolved observers.**

So many people are getting offended by things they perceive is for them. I've seen many a time where people have posted something because they thought it was funny, meaningful, needed to be mentioned etc. and some people going off the wall because they've either misinterpreted the post thinking it was about them or they think that they have to call it out because someone else won't when to be fair... no one else cares!

The Ghost in the Shell kerfuffle similarly comes to mind. Or the people who got up in arms because Disney was releasing Miyazaki films to theaters with English dubs. Never mind if a hundred times more people will be exposed to the source material because it's released that way- with a popular Western star, or in a spoken language they can understand. Never mind that the originals remain entirely available to those who want to seek them out. Or that a number of interviewed Japanese people seemed to like the way Johansson looked in the role... Or that Lucy grossed more than Pacific Rim on less than one quarter the budget.

It's well and good to be respectful. But there's a wide divide between "being respectful" and "walking, cowering, on eggshells at all times". At a certain point, the potentially offended have to make a good faith effort to contemplate the possibility that neither oppression nor offense was the intent. And perhaps consider whether their own intentions have more to do with preserving something that is good, or merely a kind of elitism- keeping something special for themselves, keeping others out of the "in-club", ignoring any other costs or factors.

The author of a text about Native American mythologies I read in high school went on with length and enthusiasm about oral traditions passed down from teller to teller and never written down. I had to wonder, even at the time, how many traditions were lost because of keeping them to strictly oral traditions, or only preserved because someone like the author had been bothered to write them down.

I remember feeling this with the whole Iron Fist thing.

I do think there's a certain irony in a lot of people declaring it's cultural appropriation to have a white guy doing martial arts when the complaints are being made by either white people on behalf of Asian people or, occasionally, actual Asian people but in English.

(There were some better points raised back when the Geeks of Colour first started this, like the white saviour narrative, but the cast claim they don't do that and I'm willing to give it benefit of the doubt. As long as Shang Chi does turn up like I heard he did and kicks some ass)

I feel like cultural assimilation has recieved a really negative re-branding as culturual appropriation, I'm hoping they bring back assimilation as a limited time run.

So to summarise: Some things are cultural appropriation, some things aren't; there isn't an obvious line. That's a fair enough point, but it feels like this article is treading water. It simply restates a problem.

I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others". To take Avril Lavigne, I can easily see how what she does in her video could be called out as inappropriate. As the linked article points out, Gwen Stefani was criticised for doing the exact same thing years before. We don't have to wait in hope for a Japanese person to complain about it before we can say it is a bad idea. I'd argue it is necessary that people learn to act out on behalf of other cultures without being prompted, and not at all overbearing like some people paint it.

Smithnikov:
Oh lord, now what...

Oh what a surprise. Hapened at a university again. This will certainly be relevant to my life, I'm sure. *eyeroll*

Well, no shocker here. University people do something stupid university policy related, and I'm supposed to act like it's the left wing PC death squads coming to get me. Been hearing this wolf cry for 5 or 6 years now, and it's still not changed my situation one bit.

I'm really going to be happy when people keep trying to insist that insulated dumbass university people are more relevant to my life than the people running my town and county.

Thing is, they'll become in charge in a few years. All we can hope is they grow up by then.

I read some blog where two girls visited Japan and got a "Geisha-Makeover". You can get appointments at shops for that. And can walk around in a traditional outfit. The two girls even were asked by Japanese people to get photos with them, because they liked it so much.
Sounds pretty inappropriate to me doing this... now ... not...

maninahat:
I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others". To take Avril Lavigne, I can easily see how what she does in her video could be called out as inappropriate. As the linked article points out, Gwen Stefani was criticised for doing the exact same thing years before. We don't have to wait in hope for a Japanese person to complain about it before we can say it is a bad idea. I'd argue it is necessary that people learn to act out on behalf of other cultures without being prompted, and not at all overbearing like some people paint it.

Second that...there is a difference between "speaking for" and "speaking up for".

IIRC, while Japanese people in Japan weren't offended by Lavigne, this was not the case for Japanese people in the West.

Cultural appropriation is a load of bullshit and pure retarded entitlement of offended for others. Cultures mixing is how they grow and keep from dying out and becoming stagnant.

Robert B. Marks:
Appropriating Culture

Yes, it is time to pinch our noses once again, as we are descending back into outrage culture.

Read Full Article

I love rational discourse, and you sir are far more rational than a large percentage of "journalists" out there. That being said, the saddest part is that I will share your work here on various platforms and can guarantee very few will read it yet those who skim or just read the topic will have massive opinions on the article anyway. I think more than anything that says the most about the current state of the public opinion, that it doesn't matter what content actually exists, the topical idea is enough for most people to spout close-minded opinions and rhetoric, without even bothering to give the actual substance any weight whatsoever.
Its not an argument of logic, its a shouting match of emotional knee-jerk reactions, what some people call "triggers" (another term IMO that is misused).
I wonder if this is by and large a failing of education systems, where it seems that substance matters little because the system seems to encourage scanning for keywords to memorize, paired with divisional lines of political thought during mid-teens/early 20's (high school and college age) seeming to be more important topics of education than applied skills, critical thinking and of course personal responsibility to make your own opinions.

Veldie:
Cultural appropriation is a load of bullshit and pure retarded entitlement of offended for others. Cultures mixing is how they grow and keep from dying out and becoming stagnant.

Sure, but I think cultural appropriation is different from cultural assimilation. Let's think of it like this:
A bunch of middle class white guys dressing up in over-sized Wu Tang Clan apparel and rapping about pushing dope and life on the mean streets is cultural appropriation.
A bunch of middle class white guys wearing hoodies and "borrowing" the beats and sampling of rappers to create their own musical style is cultural assimilation.

Cultural appropriation is one of these things that is really tricky to nail down, since it will mean different things to different people. However, I think most of us can agree that the concept exists in some form or another. If not, there's a delicious irony in the fact that the people who now decry cultural appropriation as bullshit is exactly the same people who accused Fake Gamer Girls of appropriating gamer culture a few years ago.

With nuances in each culture comes with intent and context for each thing.

You mentioned Yoga, I know a lot of people that are into Yoga and will call bullshit on the class if it's not done right or done properly. They know misuse when they see it because they fully understand what Yoga is, and the purpose of it.

I think a certain level of ignorance comes into play by both parties. The people doing the appropriating may be acting out a stereotype of what they think of the culture with no knowledge of what they are actually doing, and I think they deserve to be called out, or at least told that what they are doing isn't cool and explained why. Then again, people will always be assholes and do it for the "lolz" with zero regard for what they are doing.

As for the outrage people, I just think they like being the moral crusaders and try to be "the good guy" in all of it. I think it comes with the mentality of "if you are X you should not being doing Y because it's their culture". Not that I agree with it because how else are you going to learn about a culture if you don't bother to engage in it. I mean, there's a Greek festival happening in my city next month and the Greek community here puts on a huge party at their Greek Orthodox Church with lots of food and dancing. They encourage people to come to their festival that are not Greek in order to mingle and learn, and eat some awesome lamb.

I think cultural appropriation is just one of those phrases that no one has a real good idea of what it is when they see it, but everyone has an opinion on it. Not that that should be a discouraged topic because if we are going to get anywhere with each other culturally then we should at least try to know how each culture functions rather than just go off of assumptions.

So if I'm part of the involved minority, my cultural appropriation outrage is more valid? Cool! Because I have a bone to pick...

Am I the only one who looked up "Sexy Trappist Monks"? If you are curious what I found, click the spoiler box.

I think I mentioned this before. Outrage about cultural appropriation is the most blatantly bigoted position that Pro-SJW/PC advocates have. They complain anytime that a white person partake in any non-white culture. Yet, they celebrate everytime a racial minority co-opt white culture. A good example of the latter would be the musical Hamilton.

Thaluikhain:

maninahat:
I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others".

Second that...there is a difference between "speaking for" and "speaking up for".

OK, Maninahat and Thaluikhain, what makes your opinions on morality and social issues superior than everyone else's? What knowledge that you have that the masses of people, who thinks differently than you, lack? I believe you don't have such knowledge or insight that gives you a right to speak up or for other cultures. You are both just random people who are just being self-righteous taking offense for people who aren't offended by the subject matter, but really feel that these people should be offended by it.

RaikuFA:

i

Thing is, they'll become in charge in a few years. All we can hope is they grow up by then.

In charge of WHAT, this region? Not until they hit the ripe old age of 60+ and join some form of priesthood, and already have grandkids as well. Seriously, it's almost an election requirement around here.

Still not worried about them, and certainly not more worried about them than I am the people who're holding this area's well being in their hands.

Deep down the whole thing is rooted in the weird idea that the world is static. As though Indian cuisine didn't take influences from neighbouring countries or that British pottery industries didn't take the designs from Chinese wrapping paper or that anime is mostly based on a Japanese interpretation of american cartoons.

Cultures are not these stone tablets were impart on every generation, they're reflective of the era and influences the various people in every industry experience. You are not destroying a culture by selling it a t-shirt.

Someone may scream appropriation at a white man buying a toga in Greece, but the guy selling the toga is making a sale and making money for his family. Many immigrants find a home in their new country by opening restaurants and selling the food of their fatherland, and in doing so enriches both their lives and those who enjoy their food.

That said, I can also understand the worry of homogenisation engulfing ideas and flavours in the world, of mc Donalds replacing every other restaurant and making variety a thing of the past. But as long as change is allowed to happen to every culture it can adapt, entice each generation to their unique experinces and the cultures of each decade will evolve into the culture of the next with it's memory perhaps causing a resurgence in old styles such as many of the revivals of the 1990s.

Smithnikov:

RaikuFA:

i

Thing is, they'll become in charge in a few years. All we can hope is they grow up by then.

In charge of WHAT, this region? Not until they hit the ripe old age of 60+ and join some form of priesthood, and already have grandkids as well. Seriously, it's almost an election requirement around here.

Still not worried about them, and certainly not more worried about them than I am the people who're holding this area's well being in their hands.

When I lived in CA we had a couple of people in their 30's running for offices. Sounds like you live in West Virgina or some place like that.

maninahat:
I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others". To take Avril Lavigne, I can easily see how what she does in her video could be called out as inappropriate. As the linked article points out, Gwen Stefani was criticised for doing the exact same thing years before. We don't have to wait in hope for a Japanese person to complain about it before we can say it is a bad idea. I'd argue it is necessary that people learn to act out on behalf of other cultures without being prompted, and not at all overbearing like some people paint it.

It may be easy to criticise Avril Lavigne, but I'd argue that she has probably watched more J-Pop videos and spoken to more Japanese people than most of the people doing the criticising. And since, you know, the Japanese fans of hers don't seem to have a massive issue, it's definitely overbearing to presume you can stand up for the oppressed Japanese. As though they need a westerner to look out for them...

Also, it's especially ironic considering pretty much the entire Japanese music industry is based on taking things that were originally done in the west, and doing them their own way. They took rock and roll and gave us Visual Kei, they took the boy-band girl-band thing and gave us idol groups (for better or worse), yet now it's too much for a westerner to have a go at doing an interpretation of current Japanese music trends.

Catnip1024:

maninahat:
I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others". To take Avril Lavigne, I can easily see how what she does in her video could be called out as inappropriate. As the linked article points out, Gwen Stefani was criticised for doing the exact same thing years before. We don't have to wait in hope for a Japanese person to complain about it before we can say it is a bad idea. I'd argue it is necessary that people learn to act out on behalf of other cultures without being prompted, and not at all overbearing like some people paint it.

It may be easy to criticise Avril Lavigne, but I'd argue that she has probably watched more J-Pop videos and spoken to more Japanese people than most of the people doing the criticising. And since, you know, the Japanese fans of hers don't seem to have a massive issue, it's definitely overbearing to presume you can stand up for the oppressed Japanese. As though they need a westerner to look out for them...

Well, I'll give you another couple of examples to explain my thinking. My ex was Chinese, and found most of the racial epithets ("Chink", "China man" etc.) used on Asians to be funny. If she doesn't find them insulting, does that mean I should be okay with people calling her a chink? Am I just being patronising by pointing out these are offensive, racist things to say, even if she didn't take offence? This sort of thing happens a lot, where the implications of someone's behaviour aren't understood by the people on the receiving end - like Bush finding it funny that someone threw shoes at him, even though that is a severe insult to pay someone in Iraq. In both of these cases, it doesn't matter if offence wasn't taken, it is fine to criticise that sort of treatment. I'd argue it is a similar sort of issue with Avril Lavigne, where even if Japanese people are fine or happy to be depicted that way, that doesn't mean there is no harm in what she is doing.

Also, it's especially ironic considering pretty much the entire Japanese music industry is based on taking things that were originally done in the west, and doing them their own way. They took rock and roll and gave us Visual Kei, they took the boy-band girl-band thing and gave us idol groups (for better or worse), yet now it's too much for a westerner to have a go at doing an interpretation of current Japanese music trends.

Music has always been about pinching other genres (c.f. black blues/soul music and white rock and roll), but I think there is a distinction to be made between taking a thing and doing it in your style, and putting on a modern day minstrel show full of ethnic stereotypes.

KissingSunlight:
Am I the only one who looked up "Sexy Trappist Monks"? If you are curious what I found, click the spoiler box.

I think I mentioned this before. Outrage about cultural appropriation is the most blatantly bigoted position that Pro-SJW/PC advocates have. They complain anytime that a white person partake in any non-white culture. Yet, they celebrate everytime a racial minority co-opt white culture. A good example of the latter would be the musical Hamilton.

This sounds a lot like the "why can black comedians make fun of white people, but not white comedians make fun of black people?" complaint. I suggest you read up on "punching up vs punching down" to learn the difference. Also, I don't think people are criticising whites just for partaking in non-white cultures. They are criticising the times white people trivialise, stereotype, or outright pilfer from non-white cultures.

Thaluikhain:

maninahat:
I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others".

Second that...there is a difference between "speaking for" and "speaking up for".

OK, Maninahat and Thaluikhain, what makes your opinions on morality and social issues superior than everyone else's? What knowledge that you have that the masses of people, who thinks differently than you, lack? I believe you don't have such knowledge or insight that gives you a right to speak up or for other cultures. You are both just random people who are just being self-righteous taking offense for people who aren't offended by the subject matter, but really feel that these people should be offended by it.

I don't recall suggesting I had a moral superiority. Nor am I mandating that people must be offended. In fact my argument is that it isn't necessary for the recipient to take offence for a thing to deserve criticism. I do happen to think my opinion is right, but then of course I would - it's my opinion - if I didn't think it was right, I would have a different opinion.

Uh huh. But wait! This site already posted an article on cultural appropriation. If I remember correctly, and I do, it consisted of one word: Bullshit. That pathetic, futile, callous, contemptible little stunt makes me kind of not really give a shit about what The Escapist and its community has to say on the subject.

But hey, kudos for at least devoting a bit of time, effort and thought to the subject.

This was already fully discussed and analyzed here on Escapist. The conclusion was: Bullshit.

And nothing else needs to be said every time some (caucasian, it's always a caucasian) PC special snowflake screams "cultural appropriation!!!11!1!".

KissingSunlight:
OK, Maninahat and Thaluikhain, what makes your opinions on morality and social issues superior than everyone else's? What knowledge that you have that the masses of people, who thinks differently than you, lack? I believe you don't have such knowledge or insight that gives you a right to speak up or for other cultures. You are both just random people who are just being self-righteous taking offense for people who aren't offended by the subject matter, but really feel that these people should be offended by it.

I fail to see how that relates in any way to what either Maninahat or myself has said. If people aren't offended by some depiction of them or their culture, fine, I'm not going to tell them they should. There's plenty of times when people are offended by something, and, if after looking at it I agree with what they are saying, I might say so.

RaikuFA:

Smithnikov:

RaikuFA:

i

Thing is, they'll become in charge in a few years. All we can hope is they grow up by then.

In charge of WHAT, this region? Not until they hit the ripe old age of 60+ and join some form of priesthood, and already have grandkids as well. Seriously, it's almost an election requirement around here.

Still not worried about them, and certainly not more worried about them than I am the people who're holding this area's well being in their hands.

When I lived in CA we had a couple of people in their 30's running for offices. Sounds like you live in West Virgina or some place like that.

Very astute. I live in Virginia just 20 minutes south of the border of it.

maninahat:
Well, I'll give you another couple of examples to explain my thinking. My ex was Chinese, and found most of the racial epithets ("Chink", "China man" etc.) used on Asians to be funny. If she doesn't find them insulting, does that mean I should be okay with people calling her a chink? Am I just being patronising by pointing out these are offensive, racist things to say, even if she didn't take offence? This sort of thing happens a lot, where the implications of someone's behaviour aren't understood by the people on the receiving end - like Bush finding it funny that someone threw shoes at him, even though that is a severe insult to pay someone in Iraq. In both of these cases, it doesn't matter if offence wasn't taken, it is fine to criticise that sort of treatment. I'd argue it is a similar sort of issue with Avril Lavigne, where even if Japanese people are fine or happy to be depicted that way, that doesn't mean there is no harm in what she is doing.

There's a whole world of difference between intentional slurs and innocent... I suppose you could call it mimicry? They aren't even remotely comparable.

But even so, if no harm was meant, and no harm was received by those being copied, what's the issue? Promoting the stereotype of the crazy Japanese? Well, Kyary Pamyu Pamyu does that well enough herself, all Avril Lavigne does is increase exposure. And personally, I don't even see that.

Music has always been about pinching other genres (c.f. black blues/soul music and white rock and roll), but I think there is a distinction to be made between taking a thing and doing it in your style, and putting on a modern day minstrel show full of ethnic stereotypes.

Ethnic stereotypes? Like? So, she has a sushi and sake in the video. She's a tourist in Japan. What do you want her to do, go to McDonalds? The robotic expressions of the dancers? Well, there are plenty of real people shown in the video. The ludicrous colour scheme of bits of the video? Personally I thought that was more to do with the Hello Kitty bit than Japan, but either way, I refer you back to Kyary Pamyu Pamyu.

There may be legitimate examples of "cultural appropriation" in which a reasonable argument can be made either way, but this is a bizarre choice of hill to die on (I can't even see my house from the top). Having read up on it, it was filmed by a Japanese label, with a Japanese director, and Japanese choreographers. Surely we should be celebrating the fact that it is promoting a more inclusive industry?

maninahat:

KissingSunlight:
Am I the only one who looked up "Sexy Trappist Monks"? If you are curious what I found, click the spoiler box.

I think I mentioned this before. Outrage about cultural appropriation is the most blatantly bigoted position that Pro-SJW/PC advocates have. They complain anytime that a white person partake in any non-white culture. Yet, they celebrate everytime a racial minority co-opt white culture. A good example of the latter would be the musical Hamilton.

This sounds a lot like the "why can black comedians make fun of white people, but not white comedians make fun of black people?" complaint. I suggest you read up on "punching up vs punching down" to learn the difference. Also, I don't think people are criticising whites just for partaking in non-white cultures. They are criticising the times white people trivialise, stereotype, or outright pilfer from non-white cultures.

It sounds like you don't believe in equality. However, I do believe in equality. Punching is punching. Regardless of who is doing the punching. So, to your example, if a black comedian tells a joke making fun of white people is not being racist. Then a white comedian telling a joke that makes fun of black people is not being racist.

The whole "punching up/punching down" is trying to rationalize bigotry. Like I said before, cultural appropriation argument is an effort to justify bigotry.

Thaluikhain:

maninahat:
I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others".

Second that...there is a difference between "speaking for" and "speaking up for".

OK, Maninahat and Thaluikhain, what makes your opinions on morality and social issues superior than everyone else's? What knowledge that you have that the masses of people, who thinks differently than you, lack? I believe you don't have such knowledge or insight that gives you a right to speak up or for other cultures. You are both just random people who are just being self-righteous taking offense for people who aren't offended by the subject matter, but really feel that these people should be offended by it.

I don't recall suggesting I had a moral superiority. Nor am I mandating that people must be offended. In fact my argument is that it isn't necessary for the recipient to take offence for a thing to deserve criticism. I do happen to think my opinion is right, but then of course I would - it's my opinion - if I didn't think it was right, I would have a different opinion.

In just another post that you were trying to convince your ex-girlfriend that she should be offended by a racist slur. You were doing what you are claiming that you don't do. To answer the question you asked in the other post...

Am I just being patronising by pointing out these are offensive, racist things to say, even if she didn't take offence?

Yes, you were being patronizing. It is condescending to try to dictate to other people what they should be offended about.

The worst part about this is that the cultural appropriation argument seems to be only used against white people.
Basically, it's just another way for anti white racists to act racist without being called racists.

KissingSunlight:

maninahat:

This sounds a lot like the "why can black comedians make fun of white people, but not white comedians make fun of black people?" complaint. I suggest you read up on "punching up vs punching down" to learn the difference. Also, I don't think people are criticising whites just for partaking in non-white cultures. They are criticising the times white people trivialise, stereotype, or outright pilfer from non-white cultures.

It sounds like you don't believe in equality. However, I do believe in equality. Punching is punching. Regardless of who is doing the punching. So, to your example, if a black comedian tells a joke making fun of white people is not being racist. Then a white comedian telling a joke that makes fun of black people is not being racist.

What you believe in is in equal treatment, which is distinct from what I believe in, which is equal opportunity. In an idealised world where black and white people have always enjoyed the same social status, then yes, a white comedian making fun of a black people would be the exact same as visa verse. But this isn't reality, and that's where punching up and punching down come into it, and why Jim Davidson no longer has a career but Chris Rock does. What if I told you that treating people equally can in some cases create inequality? It's a bit of a tangent to go further into it, but you can PM me about it if you like.

Thaluikhain:

Second that...there is a difference between "speaking for" and "speaking up for".

OK, Maninahat and Thaluikhain, what makes your opinions on morality and social issues superior than everyone else's? What knowledge that you have that the masses of people, who thinks differently than you, lack? I believe you don't have such knowledge or insight that gives you a right to speak up or for other cultures. You are both just random people who are just being self-righteous taking offense for people who aren't offended by the subject matter, but really feel that these people should be offended by it.

I don't recall suggesting I had a moral superiority. Nor am I mandating that people must be offended. In fact my argument is that it isn't necessary for the recipient to take offence for a thing to deserve criticism. I do happen to think my opinion is right, but then of course I would - it's my opinion - if I didn't think it was right, I would have a different opinion.

In just another post that you were trying to convince your ex-girlfriend that she should be offended by a racist slur.

Except I didn't? If you read what I wrote, you'll see I hadn't told her to be offended. I condemned the racist, offensive slur. The fact that I am telling you right now that Chink is an offensive, racist slur, doesn't mean I am demanding that you must feel offended by that word right now.

KissingSunlight:
Am I the only one who looked up "Sexy Trappist Monks"? If you are curious what I found, click the spoiler box.

I think I mentioned this before. Outrage about cultural appropriation is the most blatantly bigoted position that Pro-SJW/PC advocates have. They complain anytime that a white person partake in any non-white culture. Yet, they celebrate everytime a racial minority co-opt white culture. A good example of the latter would be the musical Hamilton.

Thaluikhain:

maninahat:
I do get riled up a bit when people criticise the act of "being offended on the behalf of others".

Second that...there is a difference between "speaking for" and "speaking up for".

OK, Maninahat and Thaluikhain, what makes your opinions on morality and social issues superior than everyone else's? What knowledge that you have that the masses of people, who thinks differently than you, lack? I believe you don't have such knowledge or insight that gives you a right to speak up or for other cultures. You are both just random people who are just being self-righteous taking offense for people who aren't offended by the subject matter, but really feel that these people should be offended by it.

Their opinion is not superior to "everyone else" but they have regularly empathized with people who have been oppressed in some way.

Cant say as much for maninahat (not saying you are bad, I just am not as familiar with your own views) but Thaluikhain regularly has shown to care about those less fortunate either because of racial discrimination, economic discrimination, sex or gender discrimination etc.

They have shown to have other people's well-being in mind.

Others however like to get mad at people for wanting equality, others get mad at people for wanting to be treated decently even though they are different than "normal".

Others look at those fighting to be treated fairly, and despite having many advantages over them say "Where is my parade? Where is my month? Why do I have to see their relationships (even though my relationships are standard in media)? Why do I have to care about their feelings?"

Some people are straight cis non-Americans telling transgendered non-straight Americans that they are wrong about the discrimination they face in their own country.

You criticize them for seeming to think they know whats best. But uh...what makes you any more qualified then?

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