192: Cluster Fun

Cluster Fun

Thanks to the internet, game development can happen anywhere. So why do so many studios often seem to huddle together in the same region? Jason Della Rocca sheds some light on the question of clustering, and how governments, game developers and universities can use it to their advantage.

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Bah, Richard Florida. In Rise of the Creative Class, he suggested that cities with higher percentages of gay citizens would be more 'creative'. Oh, and also more hippies.

After many large N.A. population centers tried and failed to build their own Greenwich Villages and Yonge & Wellesleys in a misguided attempt to level up their city culture, Florida moved on to writing expensive, nebulous proposals full of helpful infrastructure suggestions that don't actually suggest anything in particular.

yea i saw a lecture about that
this is it;
http://www.tvo.org/TVO/WebObjects/TVO.woa?video?BI_Full_20081115_834106_RichardFlorida

Clemenstation:
Bah, Richard Florida. In Rise of the Creative Class, he suggested that cities with higher percentages of gay citizens would be more 'creative'. Oh, and also more hippies.

After many large N.A. population centers tried and failed to build their own Greenwich Villages and Yonge & Wellesleys in a misguided attempt to level up their city culture, Florida moved on to writing expensive, nebulous proposals full of helpful infrastructure suggestions that don't actually suggest anything in particular.

yea the thing about all this stuff is it's creative hence the name so that means u can't copypasta
for example Aliens was kinda creative
everything else that copied it wasn't

and about the first part those are just signs of a more advanced culture
yea i don't like the idea of a more gay society but it's going to happen

This cluster culture that you keep referencing is probably due to the "slow" development of technology. The transfer of materials has become easier and easier over the past (enter arbitrary number of years here). I've been an active part in nearly every modding community i could wrap my fingers around since the days of Warcraft 2. At first I just made maps on warcraft two to enjoy to myself but then when I moved on to counter-strike and the half-life engine, I started wanting to make maps for other people. Communities such as cs-maps (http://www.cs-maps.org/) were a great base for getting your hard work out there in the community, providing a database of nearly endless user-created maps to play.

Since then, the source engine has been released and with it, larger and larger mods (in terms of not only file size but actual playability) have followed suit. The problem with this comes back to my root point. Transferring the materials has been the hardest part of development, but with faster internet connections, the world is becoming a smaller and smaller place. What might once have taken me several hours to send to the rest of my mod team now takes only minutes, and the results are obvious. The communities have grown (http://www.interlopers.net/) and flourished.

The information highway has packed more than we can possibly imagine into cyberspace and pretty soon it won't matter if a producer is located in florida or on the moon. Sure, clusters will always have their benefits, being an easy and convenient way to get your game out there and get a response right now, but as the digital universe expands to new horizons, the necessity of a cluster for development in such a unique industry will become less and less apparent.

It took Columbus from August 3rd 1942 until October 12th 1942 to travel across the ocean. Now, a flight from Canada to the other end of the globe takes what, 8 hours? (scuze me if my travel times are a bit off). Long story short, the world has been shrinking from the day it was created. It's just a matter of who needs to be where at what time.

I think many people underestimate the need to be face to face on creative projects.

Living and working in Australia, it's always amazing how much difference face to face contact with publisher based producers is so much more productive than phone, video and email contact.

You can sit down with someone and show them something, they can give instant feedback, you can even punch them in the throat if their suggestions are stupid.

FunkyJ:
I think many people underestimate the need to be face to face on creative projects.

Living and working in Australia, it's always amazing how much difference face to face contact with publisher based producers is so much more productive than phone, video and email contact.

You can sit down with someone and show them something, they can give instant feedback, you can even punch them in the throat if their suggestions are stupid.

Yeah it's a bit strange that, so soon after the development of decent remote comm. technology (video conferencing, project management software, etc), the allure of 'working from home' seems to be dwindling a bit. I mean, people still work from home, but does anyone remember the hype that was built up around this idea once upon a time? Workforce of the future and all of that? We were all gonna work from our nice little suburbs, nobody visiting a head office more than once a month.

In that model, I think face time was rather underestimated in terms of actually GETTING STUFF DONE.

 

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