Who is watching gamers on Twitch?

I must say, I did try watching a lot of gamers on Twitch, like the most popular channels: Ninja, Summit1g, etc.

But...I just can't get into it. I find people talking over games really distracting and annoying. I sometimes watch game tutorials on YouTube, but only when I can't get past a particular section or confused about something. Is anyone a huge fan of Twitch, and if so, why?

I'm not a fan of watching scheduled live events (I like to watch stream archives though). I find that the point of gaming streams and LPs is the people talking, not the games themselves.

I do follow some people on Twitch, but due to time zone differences they normally start streaming at some godawful time in the morning, so I rarely get to watch much stuff live.

From my understanding the actual viewers are mostly children who are either not old enough to buy a game, want to learn how to play/be a streamer themselves, looking to cause drama, or can't afford the game.

Now of course like YouTube loads of 'viewers' are paid bots created by subscription companies, so who knows how many people actually watch Twitch vs what people claim are their twitch viewer counts

Silentpony:

Now of course like YouTube loads of 'viewers' are paid bots created by subscription companies, so who knows how many people actually watch Twitch vs what people claim are their twitch viewer counts

Enough real people for the stream income surpass the subscription bots costs.

CaitSeith:

Silentpony:

Now of course like YouTube loads of 'viewers' are paid bots created by subscription companies, so who knows how many people actually watch Twitch vs what people claim are their twitch viewer counts

Enough real people for the stream income surpass the subscription bots costs.

But stream income comes from sub count. Like YouTube, when the FCC catches up there will be tons of legal action. YouTube is charging companies to play ads for a channel that has 2million subs, and the company expects to be reaching that many people. But in truth if 10% of them are bots, then that's fraud. YouTube and the channel are charging for ads to subscribers that's dont exist.

So too with Twitch. Itll be very fun to watch when it starts to crumble down.

Silentpony:

CaitSeith:

Silentpony:

Now of course like YouTube loads of 'viewers' are paid bots created by subscription companies, so who knows how many people actually watch Twitch vs what people claim are their twitch viewer counts

Enough real people for the stream income surpass the subscription bots costs.

But stream income comes from sub count. Like YouTube, when the FCC catches up there will be tons of legal action. YouTube is charging companies to play ads for a channel that has 2million subs, and the company expects to be reaching that many people. But in truth if 10% of them are bots, then that's fraud. YouTube and the channel are charging for ads to subscribers that's dont exist.

So too with Twitch. Itll be very fun to watch when it starts to crumble down.

Unless you're an advertiser (or their advocate), you should care less about it being a fraud or not. They certainly don't seem to worry about such technicalities; probably because it is an open secret the existence of such bots, that they aren't controlled by Amazon or Youtube, and target-adverising to 90% of millions of people is still a good deal.

You'll have to find something else to have fun watching for a long time.

We have been watching streamers do their thing on Twitch for years, and we have found several that are entertaining and unique.

Seems like the only way is up for Twitch, despite many of us not really being a fan. I think we're all just too old for it, and I guess prefer to actually play the games! Way more fun. Nonetheless, I'm still quite fascinated by a few Twitch facts that I picked up along the way:

-You'll soon be able to watch NFL on Twitch
-At the end of 2016, 292 billion minutes of video had been watched, there are 2.2 million broadcasters, and 14.2 billion messages have been sent on Twitch
-Amazon bought Twitch for $970 million in 2014
-Twitch used to be called Justin.tv (following the life of Justin Kan with a 24-hour stream)
-If your videos have advertising, you can earn roughly $2 every 1,000 views (but donations are still the big bucks)
-Those under 25 years of age make up 37% of the viewership

I suspect it's mostly paedophiles.

I mostly follow more comedy-oriented Twitch channels, like Jerma985 or Vinesauce. Those can be pretty fun to have on in the background while you are doing something else. I don't really follow any of the "pro-gamer" guys.

 

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