I've never played an MMO

I'm torn on whether or not they even sound interesting to me.

On one hand it is a massive genre, and one that I have never experienced. I like regular RPGs, fighting giant bosses, and I sure do like huge worlds to explore and interesting lore to parse through. I don't even mind grinding too much, as long as the core gameplay loop and mechanics are fun enough, I can put on a podcast at the same time and enjoy myself.

On the other hand though I hate the gameplay. As I said, I haven't played one, but they remind me a lot of ARPGs in the gameplay, with the boring endless clicking, and mindless waiting for cooldowns to end, except with a giant piano's worth of ability shortcuts.

I'm not much into online games in general, I don't like having the responsibility of someone else's enjoyment on my shoulders, and it's not like I'm that good at games anyway. However, last year I've played Overwatch and loved it. I enjoyed the DPS, tank and healer dynamic. I did enjoy being part of a team, and luckily didn't find too many douchebags on the way. But at the end of the day, though it may have been reborn from the ashes of a failed MMO, Overwatch is still a team-based shooter, and while that means fast-paced action gameplay that I liked, it also means it's just the same skirmishes over and over again in the same comparatively small maps.

The last Insurgency event in Overwatch showed me how much I would enjoy a more structured quest like gameplay, which is what got me thinking about MMOs. I don't think other team based shooters would do it for me. Other games, even if they have classes, it's usually a matter of loadout: either you shoot people and blow them up, or you flashbang them first then you shoot them. It's not the same as having varied skills and dedicated healers and tanks. But MMOs have the ARPG-adjacent combat that I described so they're not a perfect match either. I have enjoyed single-player RPGs with combat somewhat similar to MMOs, like Xenoblade Chronicles X and Final Fantasy 15, but those games are very reliant on positioning and comboing skills, in the case of FF15 you can even practically pause the game to assess the situation and plan your course of attack, in them I never felt like I was just waiting for cooldowns to end.

It feels like the genre isn't nearly as big as they used to be, what even are the good MMOs nowadays? Is the combat fun in them? Or is it just the same old thing? I might finally be up to try one out. I'd prefer it if it was free, but if a paid one is really good I might take a look at it. As long as it's not subscription based, I don't like the idea of losing the game at the end of the month unless I keep paying for it.

I recommend Elder Scrolls Online. Dont go in expecting to play Skyrim online, but it actually feels fun to play and is not a "clicker MMO". Can even play it with a controller, which I do.

Have to buy it, but no subscription fee, unless you want to, but I dont recommend it.

And its set in the Elder Scrolls.

Yeah, right with you there.

I like the idea of MMOs, but some malevolent god seems to have decreed that they all must have the same shit gameplay. Bunch of laggy, weightless, poorly animated, overdressed motherfuckers hitting each other's numbers with their numbers, all of which is unsuccessfully obscured by each character generating a cheap fireworks display whenever they so much as scratch their arse.

The only one I ever got into was Planetside 2 since it was entirely PVP (no killing 11/30 bandits for Mr Whogivesafuck of the city guard) and used standard FPS gameplay instead of Numbers Vs Numbers. It was basically Battlefield on a larger scale with long-term progression. Had its own issues though.

for a good starting one id recommend star trek online.. free to play, you level up pretty fast, the community is great and you can complete all the story missions completely on your own

MMO's feel like they died after WoW was released, some of the former devs basically said so.

"Sometimes I look at WoW and think 'what have we done?' I think I know. I think we killed a genre." - Mark Kern

And I agree with them. Ever since then most of the studios have just wanted to copy WoW, but whats the point? Nobody is going to play your WoW clone if WoW is right there. There's been a few outliers like FF14, TESO and GW2 who have dared to do something a bit different and have seen some success for it, but the majority have been crappy WoW clones or lootbox cash grabs.

To me the journey is the game, not the destination. I never was fond of the 'rush to max level then you get to play the only content we deem worth it' style of design, why even have levels then? STO had a great journey and GW2 at release was pretty fun but was changed to be.. less so for reasons I can only guess can be derived by sniffing office markerpens or something.

I really miss city of heroes. To me the entire genre died when it was taken down by moronic korean devs who wanted to posture at their boardroom that they were 'doing something' about all the money their sh**ty korean grindfest mmo's were leaking them.

Zhukov:
Yeah, right with you there.

I like the idea of MMOs, but some malevolent god seems to have decreed that they all must have the same shit gameplay. Bunch of laggy, weightless, poorly animated, overdressed motherfuckers hitting each other's numbers with their numbers, all of which is unsuccessfully obscured by each character generating a cheap fireworks display whenever they so much as scratch their arse.

I thought Tera Online was supposed to be different. That it had proper third-person action combat, that sounded perfect to me, but looking at videos of it it looks exactly like what you described. Can't see a difference between it and the usual fare, at least not at first glance.

DaCosta:
It feels like the genre isn't nearly as big as they used to be, what even are the good MMOs nowadays?

The genre stagnated and collapsed after WoW hit its zenith. It required too much money to compete with Blizzard, leading to massive risk-adverse productions, and all of them tried to capture a slice of WoW's colossal market share by aping its game play conventions (with predictable results).

There are only a few large/healthy MMOs on the market, leaving out genre-benders like survival sims or battle royales. All of them follow the Everquest loot-level paradigm that was fully popularized and streamlined by World of Warcraft. One is obviously WoW itself, which is on a down cycle at the moment and deep into last year's expansion. Another is The Old Republic, which has increasingly musty gameplay that it keeps piling new additions onto in a rickety tower and a fairly predatory FTP model. Another is GW2, which is buy to play and wallet friendly, but has poor combat structure and no "late game" to speak of. And the last is Final Fantasy, which I haven't played, but which shows very WoW-like conventions in its design.

You won't find anything resembling Overwatch's twitch gameplay in MMOs, which tend to be more tactical. The raid focused games (WoW and FF) will have a high skill cap at the high end of raiding that might appeal...tests your ability to juggle 500 priorities while coordinating with a bunch of other people, but while the challenge-level is definitely there I cannot say definitively whether or not the game play will be interesting to you in the slightest (and it takes some investment of time to even get to that point...MMOs generally take a long time to work their way towards the point at which they become challenging).

In terms of lore and world building WoW is relatively peerless at this point. The game's age, size and staggering content depth is unmatched.

On the subject of subs vs free to play...there really is no such thing as "free to play" if you intend to play on equal footing. GW2 is probably the most generous business model, but it's also an extremely shallow game. Almost all "free" to play games have aggressively predatory business models, and at least some measure of "buying power"...or at the very least multiple layers of tedious/exhausting gameplay intended to propel you into buying convenience. There's also the old mantra of "you get what you pay for", wherein subscription games tend to be more carefully and consistently curated, due to their stronger revenue streams supporting development and the need to continually generate carrots to keep subscribers invested (and paying).

DaCosta:
I thought Tera Online was supposed to be different. That it had proper third-person action combat, that sounded perfect to me, but looking at videos of it it looks exactly like what you described. Can't see a difference between it and the usual fare, at least not at first glance.

Tera is something of an afterthought at this point, at least in the West. The games listed above are the only real successful western MMOs. That's another thing to consider, because your location will determine which servers are best for you, and how populated/lively they are. There's a host of MMOs out there that are barely limping along at subsistence level. I do not recommend any of them. Pick something people are actually playing. Nothing quite like trying to experience "massively multiplayer" in a game where there's barely 50 people online.

I tried Everquest back in the day for 3 months and City of Heros for a free 1 month trial. I enjoyed it for a little while, but when the time came to pony up more money to keep playing, I realized I didn't really care enough to do so. Honestly, I really haven't have the urge to play another MMO since then.

Hell, I was really interested in The Secret World...and then I found out it was an MMORPG. And now it's "Free" To Play, which means it's probably even less fun and more broken.

Dalisclock:
I tried Everquest back in the day for 3 months and City of Heros for a free 1 month trial. I enjoyed it for a little while, but when the time came to pony up more money to keep playing, I realized I didn't really care enough to do so. Honestly, I really haven't have the urge to play another MMO since then.

Hell, I was really interested in The Secret World...and then I found out it was an MMORPG. And now it's "Free" To Play, which means it's probably even less fun and more broken.

they are actually remaking the secret world as a shared world action RPG. good thing too imo as i loved just about everything in the secret world exept the combat which might have been the worst combat i have ever played in a RPG of any kind.

it's not exactly a MMO but warframe might be worth a try

my favorite mmorpgs are Dungeons & Dragons Online and DC Universe Online both are quite different from wow. DDo is more of coop game with hub area for everyone and quests are more of missions with handcrafted maps (that have traps and puzzles and so on) instead just throwing mobs here and there to open world.

from more wow like star wars; the old republic and neverwinter are pretty good.

then there is/was firefall, really love the gameplay being shooter first with jetpacks gliders and all! unfortunately when investors wanted turn it to other wow clone it pretty much ruined it. Still fun gameplay though but areas are level restricted pretty much and leveling is following arrows to places quest wants you instead what it was before you run in world and came across different events or dropped down your thumper and to get resources and fight hordes attacking it.

lionsprey:
they are actually remaking the secret world as a shared world action RPG. good thing too imo as i loved just about everything in the secret world exept the combat which might have been the worst combat i have ever played in a RPG of any kind.

If they'd done that from the get go the game might have been a small cult success. Instead, they're doing it years late, with a tired old engine and an IP that already has the stink of failure associated with it.

TSW really should just be put out to pasture at this point. It makes a short list of the most disastrous western MMO launches of all time, right in there with Wildstar and Vanguard.

If you don't like just clicking all the time, TERA is pretty damn good for that. Dodging/blocking is important, and while you still press buttons to use skills, it's a lot more engaging than your usual tab-targeting mmorpg.

Another good one might be Guild Wars 2. It's a mix of tab-targeting and action combat, but I remember there being a small addon that turns it into full action combat, and it even plays better than the normal style without the mod in my opinion. Plus the way the quests work in GW2 are far better than the standard "go to questgiver, get quest, go to monsters, kill monsters, go back to questgiver" type quests. And the huge world bosses and more rare events can be pretty damn fun to do with other random people.

And as said before, I can also recommend Elder Scrolls Online. It's still tab-targeting, but in a better way than what WoW does for instance. The graphics are pretty nice too, and the dungeons can be quite a challenge at times. It's also set in the elder scrolls universe and takes a ton of inspiration from oblivion and skyrim for it's mechanics. Just don't expect it to be a skyrim online, as that, it isn't.

Well, Guild Wars 2 has some quite good gameplay but you are still managing cd timers a bit, but there is no magic bar or anything to worry about. If you want something really different than Tera Online might be what you should check out. It's got some of the best rpg mmo combat around, it uses a really nice combo system so instead of having to click icons all the time you start with a move then you can combo into other moves and use parrys and dodges and such, although the combat against small enemies is a bit standard, when you fight big ones (called BAMS, big ass monsters) thats when the real fun is to be had.

If you're looking for something really different but still with other people then you might want to try out Warframe. Its more of a third person action game but with more ppl. You can play missions with up to 4 people (although that might have been increased since I last played) but its a big game world with the ability to talk to a ton of people at once and you will see a lot of players in space stations and such.

BloatedGuppy:
On the subject of subs vs free to play...there really is no such thing as "free to play" if you intend to play on equal footing. GW2 is probably the most generous business model, but it's also an extremely shallow game. Almost all "free" to play games have aggressively predatory business models, and at least some measure of "buying power"...or at the very least multiple layers of tedious/exhausting gameplay intended to propel you into buying convenience. There's also the old mantra of "you get what you pay for", wherein subscription games tend to be more carefully and consistently curated, due to their stronger revenue streams supporting development and the need to continually generate carrots to keep subscribers invested (and paying).

Yes, indeed. I've played some F2P MMOs and, for the most part, they seem to be geared towards yopu buying stuff. XP boosters (pop one, and you get, say, double XP for an hour) being one of the most common ones and possible one of the least "buy power" things you can get but you can also get other stuff. The "better" S2P MMOs seem to allow you to just grind to keep up with the real money stuff. Overall, that's actually not that bad - at least for some. I know some people who can't be bothered to pay and actually like the grinding bits. It's further alleviated if you have lots of people to play with, as you can get them to help you out, when needed, trade equipment and so on. On the other hand, it's also a big time investment, so it's mostly suited to younger players. Not trying to bad mouth them, but they generally just have more time at their hands.

Somewhat related - I've recently learned of Black Desert Online. I don't really know much about it but I did hear they have some sort of AFK progression mechanic. You can set your character to do something like fishing and just leave the game running. I really don't know how this works in practice, but it seems like they took the concept of grinding, realised some people were bored by it and decided to both keep it but not make people endure it. Also, for non-gameplay benefit, I imagine it helps the game look more active, since more players would be online at a time.

DoPo:
Somewhat related - I've recently learned of Black Desert Online. I don't really know much about it but I did hear they have some sort of AFK progression mechanic. You can set your character to do something like fishing and just leave the game running. I really don't know how this works in practice, but it seems like they took the concept of grinding, realised some people were bored by it and decided to both keep it but not make people endure it. Also, for non-gameplay benefit, I imagine it helps the game look more active, since more players would be online at a time.

BDO is apparently a loathsome Korean Grinder pay-to-win game in sheep's clothing. It enjoyed a small burst of enthusiasm immediately after launch, and then rapidly fell off the map amidst a storm of hostile feedback.

I've seen things you wouldn't believe. Newbie zergs hunting PKs off the site of Cruma Tower. I watched 400 people charge forward as the server struggled to hold us. Crowds gathered around as Algalon the Observer made his first proclamation to spare Azeroth. All those moments lost in time, like mage tears during patch notes. Time... to die. And respawn.

I will now posit something many people will no doubt find heretical: the GAME part of MMOs isn't what's most important. It's not. Hear me out.

Take any MMO and you'll find it has a few differences to your standard RPG. The numero uno of these is lag. Lag changes the game. It makes the combat more sluggish, interferes with hitboxes, reduces the amount of data that can be reliably sent to your machine. Lag has dictated an MMO's mechanics, and even though newer ones have improved to a more action-oriented style, they are still RPGs first and foremost because they are massive, they take a lot of bandwidth, and RPG mechanics are simply better suited to such things (as well as having progression systems which I'll get into further down).

But take any MMO and compare it to a single-player game, and you will no doubt find it lacking. The combat isn't as polished as it should be. The experience can vary depending on expansion. The story isn't very well paced, fleshed out, or even consistent. Fetching Ten Rat Tails is a task that you will do both at levels 1 and 80+ (they'll be called Ten Aetherial Crystals by then though).

Most importantly: the pacing is SLOW. It has to be slow, because you have to finish it slowly in order to keep your subscription. IF it has no subscription, or is WoW, it may be faster, but the endgame will have you do so many meaningless tasks that you'll wonder why you even started to begin with.

So then why play an MMO? Because MMOs have one advantage over single player games. One advantage that started the entire genre, that consolidates MMOs into what they are, and that has been woefully ignored in favor of making them more like single-player games (as much as I disagree with that):

The social aspect.

Long story short, playing an MMO by yourself is a miserable exercise unless you're a high-schooler with 16 hours of free time daily and nothing else to do. Don't play MMOs for the mechanics or story. Play them for the community. Get your friends in, find people to play with, be social, trade, chat, get involved in server-side politics, meet new people, kill them. Only then you'll find that your experience with these games gets 10x better. And only then will you make some memories that will last more than your attention span.

If you have no intention to do any of these things, you're better off sticking to the good ol' single-players.

DaCosta:

Zhukov:
Yeah, right with you there.

I like the idea of MMOs, but some malevolent god seems to have decreed that they all must have the same shit gameplay. Bunch of laggy, weightless, poorly animated, overdressed motherfuckers hitting each other's numbers with their numbers, all of which is unsuccessfully obscured by each character generating a cheap fireworks display whenever they so much as scratch their arse.

I thought Tera Online was supposed to be different. That it had proper third-person action combat, that sounded perfect to me, but looking at videos of it it looks exactly like what you described. Can't see a difference between it and the usual fare, at least not at first glance.

I haven't tried Tera because its a heep of weeb trash but they say this about any and every MMO.

"Oh no, the combat is totally different in this one! Its amazing, better than most single player games! Its based on real time dodging and blablablabla!"

Total bullshit. I've played ESO, GW2, SWTOR, LOTRO, I'm sure I'm forgetting one or two - and yes, I regret every single on of those and it didn't last long - and the combat is always the same bullshit. Sorry to say it but WoW still has the best combat out of any MMO I've played. Yes, you just stand around pressing the same buttons in a particular sequence over and over again, perhaps occasionally strafing for two second if you're feeling really naughty, but at least its functional and doesn't feel clunky as hell.

BloatedGuppy:

DoPo:
Somewhat related - I've recently learned of Black Desert Online. I don't really know much about it but I did hear they have some sort of AFK progression mechanic. You can set your character to do something like fishing and just leave the game running. I really don't know how this works in practice, but it seems like they took the concept of grinding, realised some people were bored by it and decided to both keep it but not make people endure it. Also, for non-gameplay benefit, I imagine it helps the game look more active, since more players would be online at a time.

BDO is apparently a loathsome Korean Grinder pay-to-win game in sheep's clothing. It enjoyed a small burst of enthusiasm immediately after launch, and then rapidly fell off the map amidst a storm of hostile feedback.

Despite the fact I know next to nothing about the game, somehow I'm not surprised by this. No wonder they did the AFK stuff, then, I guess my assessment that it makes the game seem more active is probably exactly why they did it.

Samtemdo8:

DaCosta:
snip

Wait a minute....you I know YOU!!!

https://www.gog.com/forum/general/ive_never_played_an_mmo/page1

I think it is I who know you, Josue.

http://the-magog-forum.freeforums.net/thread/693/real-names-on-internet

Still using your brother's account on GOG, are you?

DaCosta:

Samtemdo8:

DaCosta:
snip

Wait a minute....you I know YOU!!!

https://www.gog.com/forum/general/ive_never_played_an_mmo/page1

I think it is I who know you, Josue.

http://the-magog-forum.freeforums.net/thread/693/real-names-on-internet

Still using your brother's account on GOG, are you?

Yep back in 2011 I never had my own account because I never knew how to use and make an Account, so I just kept using my brother's account, And too many GOG games on that account aswell.

For what it's worth...

GW2. Combat is...functional. If it had entertaining combat I would still be playing this. It looks great, has an interesting world and even a story that I can half remember, which as far as MMO's go is absolutely astounding. It feeds you new loot and levels etc at a rate that keeps you interested and the large world means that you don't need to grind an area you've already played through for XP, there will be somewhere else of an appropriate level to play with at least for your first 3 or 4 characters.

Neverwinter. Actually has really decent action combat and different roles do feel different to play. Unfortunately the world, although well realised, is much smaller than most MMOs, and feels much more like playing through a singleplayer RPG, once you've gone through the main campaign there isn't much reason to keep going. It's free though, and I certainly didn't regret playing through it.

TERA. Good combat, but you only ever need to do anything other than press a couple of attacks over and over 90% of the time. Occasionally you might get into a fight with with an elite monster a few levels higher and you actually have to fight, and it's pretty satisfying, but otherwise the combat is wasted. Also, it is vomit inducingly animu.

Destiny ( or Destiny 2) sounds right up your alley. Multiplayer co-op, face pace shooting with Rpg elements.

If you have a ps4 or xbone, there is a budle with all the expansions or if you are on PC, you can wait for Destiny 2.

Lufia Erim:
Destiny ( or Destiny 2) sounds right up your alley. Multiplayer co-op, face pace shooting with Rpg elements.

If you have a ps4 or xbone, there is a budle with all the expansions or if you are on PC, you can wait for Destiny 2.

I was interested in Destiny for a long time. Funnily though, it was more after having played Hyrule Warriors and enjoying the gameplay loop of killing thousands of enemies in a hands-on action game and going for gold medals and high scores.

How is the team play in it? It doesn't have tank and support classes does it? It looks like everyone just kills enemies, and the more people you have on your team, the more enemies you get to kill.

Unfortunately, I'm not a big fan of console FPS games, and the game was never cheap enough that I could justify a leap of faith. I might look at Destiny 2 more closely when it comes out.

My problem with MMOs usually isn't the gameplay but the way they have to be balanced to accommodate those that play the game like it's their full time job. They tend to be massive time sinks with little reward as a result, at least from my perspective. There is also the need to coordinate with other people which can be extremely difficult for a number of reasons. I know that's kinda of the whole point of an MMO but I guess I prefer the more "alone together" style.

RiseOfTheWhiteWolf:

I haven't tried Tera because its a heep of weeb trash but they say this about any and every MMO.

"Oh no, the combat is totally different in this one! Its amazing, better than most single player games! Its based on real time dodging and blablablabla!"

Total bullshit. I've played ESO, GW2, SWTOR, LOTRO, I'm sure I'm forgetting one or two - and yes, I regret every single on of those and it didn't last long - and the combat is always the same bullshit. Sorry to say it but WoW still has the best combat out of any MMO I've played. Yes, you just stand around pressing the same buttons in a particular sequence over and over again, perhaps occasionally strafing for two second if you're feeling really naughty, but at least its functional and doesn't feel clunky as hell.

Tera does have the combat system they say it does, BUT!!! it's bogged down by the fact they use the same quest types as WoW and none of the enemy's I've ever seen actually take advantage of said combat system save the odd move you need to dodge. So it might as well be tab target from what I've seen of it. Plus, it's actually kind of boring.

Which is a common problem with 'action MMO' in general actually. Tera, BDO, GW2, Vindictus, Dungeon and Dragons online, Neverwinter (please don't play Vidi or Neverwinter) all have an 'action based combat system' and of the lot, Vindictus is the only one that did it right, only to be ruined later by Nexon, because, Nexon. They all have the combat system they say they do, but it really only applies to the play characters, and the quest tend to be the same shit as every other MMO, effectively wasting the potential of said combat system, Or it's run by Nexon and PWE

ironically the only MMO with a combat system i feel like i'm being engaged with, is FF 14. which is not an action MMO, it's tab target.

DaCosta:

It feels like the genre isn't nearly as big as they used to be, what even are the good MMOs nowadays? Is the combat fun in them? Or is it just the same old thing? I might finally be up to try one out. I'd prefer it if it was free, but if a paid one is really good I might take a look at it. As long as it's not subscription based, I don't like the idea of losing the game at the end of the month unless I keep paying for it.

If you want to start with the MMO that is the best representation of the genre, look no further.

Watch these for a TL;DR.


Just be prepared that you're kind of going balls deep into the fire.

It sounds like you might actually enjoy Destiny.

You know, the coop shooter "mmo" that's totally not an MMO, except when it is, because Bungie has no idea what they actually want out of the game.

Dirty Hipsters:
It sounds like you might actually enjoy Destiny.

You know, the coop shooter "mmo" that's totally not an MMO, except when it is, because Bungie has no idea what they actually want out of the game.

Also a story that only exists if you go to the website and read it, apparently. Otherwise it's a lot of shooting stuff for reasons.

DaCosta:
-Snip-

If you don't mind a bit of shameless self promotion, our entire show is based around critiquing and reviewing MMOs and showing the market is a lot more varied (at times) than people think it is: https://www.youtube.com/user/chaosd1/videos

Feel free to watch and see if any of them strike your fancy though keep in mind we sometimes go back to old MMOs and update them (Episodes known as Backtracks) to try and keep the information up to date.

DaCosta:
How is the team play in it? It doesn't have tank and support classes does it? It looks like everyone just kills enemies, and the more people you have on your team, the more enemies you get to kill.

There's no trinity in Destiny, and I tend to doubt there will be in Destiny 2.

In Destiny 1 each of the classes (Titan, Hunter, and Warlock) has a sub-class that is arguably primarily support (Titan can have a 'bubble' shield that protects from incoming projectile damage and boosts teammate's armor or DPS. Hunter can go invisible, potentially rezing teammates otherwise inaccessible. Warlock can self-rez, potentially saving a wipe.), but no real tank or healer.

In group content group size is generally fixed -- three for strikes (dungeons, basically), six for raids, various numbers for different Crucible (arena PvP) types. Strategizing with teammates is anywhere from helpful to absolutely essential, depending on content and modifiers.

In group play there certainly isn't the level of interdependence you'd find in a Trinity MMO -- for better or ill, depending on your point-of-view -- but it's a bit more than 'more people = more killin'.

From what we've seen of Destiny 2 so far it doesn't look to be deviating from Destiny 1 in mechanics much at all. The weapon system is getting an overhaul, at least one sub-class each is going to be replaced and the sub-class 'perk' system appears to be changing, but most of the basic gameplay looks very much like current Destiny.

I've been playing Destiny since launch, mostly because a number of my gaming friends are obsessed with it. When playing with others it can be a blast, but, as with most such games, playing by yourself gets real old real fast. The basic mechanics are, and have been since launch, just about perfect. The weapons each have a unique feel -- you can often tell the exact weapon someone is using by sound alone, the movement system is fluid, and the graphics are often impressive. The storytelling is pretty horrid, with most of the original story, such as it was, now being handwaved into oblivion or just plain ignored in favor of telling newer stories in the latter expansions. Characters, what there are of them beyond just "named NPCs" are shallow, with Bungie heavily leaning on Nathan FIllion/Cayde6 for comic relief (something that long ago started getting on my nerves, but most people seem to love him). The reward system ('gameplay loop') was a disaster at launch, but has since been overhauled multiple times and now is pretty good -- if arguably too generous.

The long and short of it is that if you can round up some friends to play with you, definitely pick up Destiny. If you don't have any friends who want to play it you can still hook up with groups like DestinyLFG or The 100 and play with others if you want. If you plan on just playing by yourself, eh, it's a bit harder to recommend. Either way, it seems likely that familiarity with Destiny 1 will likely come in handy in Destiny 2.

Be careful. MMO can be really addictive.

Does warframe count as a mmo? Because of it is. Try that.

 

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