Ubisoft DRM Authentication Servers Go Down

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 NEXT
 

Hurr Durr Derp:
Gee, I didn't see that coming...
/sarcasm

Also, I'd like to aim a big, fat "I told you so" at those who thought this DRM was no big deal. And mark my words, worse is yet to come.

Hes right, ubisoft went into this whole heartedly and they are NOT going to admit a mistake this soon. Trust me they are going to try and breathe life into this cadaver for a while yet before they finally learn that it was beyond hope a long time ago.

Hubilub:
First the PS3, now the PC.

Now we just have to wait for every 360 in the world to stop working and the circle is complete!

...oh wait.

This made me laugh. Vigorously.

Nimbus:
Hahahaha! That'll teach 'em... or not. Probably not. They'll never learn.

Ah well, at least it gave me a laugh. Hopefully this will teach people not to buy games with crappy DRM in them.

Its hardly fair to laugh at the people who are suffering because of this. To be fair to them, Assassins Creed 2 is a really good game

7ru7h:
It is completely understandable? Not at all. How is it understandable for a company to willingly nerf their product to the point that it is basically unusable for paying customers, yet the people who steal it are in the clear?

"Sure, buy our product, but it may not work sometimes if stuff happens. But don't listen to those people who 'stole' it and say they can use it just fine. They are just liars and we know it doesn't work."

I don't think he was so much advocating DRM as he was saying that the shareholders wanting to stop piracy is understandable...

somedude98:

Hurr Durr Derp:
Gee, I didn't see that coming...
/sarcasm

Also, I'd like to aim a big, fat "I told you so" at those who thought this DRM was no big deal. And mark my words, worse is yet to come.

Hes right, ubisoft went into this whole heartedly and they are NOT going to admit a mistake this soon. Trust me they are going to try and breathe life into this cadaver for a while yet before they finally learn that it was beyond hope a long time ago.

Yep. And I'm going to have a lot of fun watching it.
Honestly, it sucks to be a consumer. Not only do you have to deal with crazy shit like this, but you actually had to pay lots of money for it. Now compare that to those pirates who haven't paid shit-all and are doing perfectly fine, and that option starts looking real good.

Icehearted:
Devil's advocate:
Valve had a similar problem with their Steam service (which I hate beyond all human comprehension) and it's still extremely popular. Bioshock, I forget exactly what happened with it, but there was something going on that made the game unplayable for paying customers. Had to do with unlocking it or something.

XBLA, Steam, Ubisoft's authentication is nothing new. Yes, I realize that the former two are supposed to be more about digital distribution and not DRM, but I defer to that Bioshock incident as an example of how Ubisoft and Steam are not all that dissimilar in certain functions.

Frankly, I hate them all in ways I cannot possibly articulate, but if that's what people want, then who am I to argue?

Atleast with single player games and Steam, you can go into an offline mode. Say if you don't have internet or the steam servers are down. You only need to be connected to first run the game with almost all of them. This constant connect to play DRM system that Ubisoft has invented is treating customer's like prisoners. You can only play when they authorize it. Not thanks .. Steam just wants to make sure ya own the game, and provide a service to redownload it and patch it. That much I can handle. As well steam's major issues have only been when they were changing server hardware, which gives any service issues.

I hope Ubisoft's system will be the death of them, if it isn't. Be prepared for the large majority of games to become like that. At that point I'm fine with what I have. And will probably spend my money on more Indie developed games.

Antari:

Icehearted:
Devil's advocate:
Valve had a similar problem with their Steam service (which I hate beyond all human comprehension) and it's still extremely popular. Bioshock, I forget exactly what happened with it, but there was something going on that made the game unplayable for paying customers. Had to do with unlocking it or something.

XBLA, Steam, Ubisoft's authentication is nothing new. Yes, I realize that the former two are supposed to be more about digital distribution and not DRM, but I defer to that Bioshock incident as an example of how Ubisoft and Steam are not all that dissimilar in certain functions.

Frankly, I hate them all in ways I cannot possibly articulate, but if that's what people want, then who am I to argue?

Atleast with single player games and Steam, you can go into an offline mode. Say if you don't have internet or the steam servers are down. You only need to be connected to first run the game with almost all of them. This constant connect to play DRM system that Ubisoft has invented is treating customer's like prisoners. You can only play when they authorize it. Not thanks .. Steam just wants to make sure ya own the game, and provide a service to redownload it and patch it. That much I can handle. As well steam's major issues have only been when they were changing server hardware, which gives any service issues.

I hope Ubisoft's system will be the death of them, if it isn't. Be prepared for the large majority of games to become like that. At that point I'm fine with what I have. And will probably spend my money on more Indie developed games.

Personally, I don't care how non-invasive Steam pretends to be. Sure, it's convenient to a certain degree, but the days when all I had to do was enter in a CD Key during install are still fresh in my mind. Why can't we revert back to that system? The DRM's just as effective and at least then, they can still pretend to be doing something about piracy, just like they're pretending right now.

Zefar:
Server went down today? Well it's online now anyway. As my brother plays it right now.

Yes he uses a real version.

Also you people overreact when the servers go down.

Ever thought too many tried to access it at once? :/

Ever thought that should be irrelevant, as the game is single-player?

You sound like you don't know any of the story, or how this DRM is being implemented.

Aheheh.....

A typical meeting at the ubisoft offices
Ubisoft worker A: Okay, lets think up a system to stop people from downloading our games and actually paying for them.
Ubisoft worker B: How about, we make them constantly have to connect to our servers to be able to play our games?
A: But our servers are terrible.
B: Don't worry, nobody'll notice.
A: PROMOTION MOTHERFUCKER!

A week later

A:Hmm.... ou servers crashed, so now nobody can log in and play our games. It seems that now less people are buying our games now, which is what we wanted to avoid in the first place.
B:Just tell them that we'll eventually solve the problem, they won't notice.
A:MOAR PROMOTION MOTHERFUCKER!

commasplice:
Personally, I don't care how non-invasive Steam pretends to be. Sure, it's convenient to a certain degree, but the days when all I had to do was enter in a CD Key during install are still fresh in my mind. Why can't we revert back to that system? The DRM's just as effective and at least then, they can still pretend to be doing something about piracy, just like they're pretending right now.

I have never looked at Steam as a DRM system... I always saw it as a digital distribution system. It's interesting to me that people view it as a DRM system.

commasplice:

Antari:

Icehearted:
snip

snip

Personally, I don't care how non-invasive Steam pretends to be. Sure, it's convenient to a certain degree, but the days when all I had to do was enter in a CD Key during install are still fresh in my mind. Why can't we revert back to that system? The DRM's just as effective and at least then, they can still pretend to be doing something about piracy, just like they're pretending right now.

The days when CD Key's didn't exist is still fresh in my mind. But unfortunately they will never take what they see to be a step backwards. Its picking the lesser of two evils. If the industry goes completely nuts I'll just play old games and stay away from new stuff entirely. At best Ubisoft will tone the current DRM down, but unless people stop buying their games, they will continue to think they've done a great job.

SavingPrincess:
I have never looked at Steam as a DRM system... I always saw it as a digital distribution system. It's interesting to me that people view it as a DRM system.

Oh, I don't really have that much of a problem with it in that regard. I mean, as long as I can still own a physical copy, if I so choose, I'm happy. I just don't like having to sign in to Steam any time I want to fire up Portal. I play single player games for the hell of it plenty, but I know that one of my favorite ways to pass the time during an internet outage is to play video games. Any system that makes it impossible for me to do that is just kind of silly in my eyes. What's the point in buying the game if I can't play when I want, where I want, you know?

Good, wont be long until they patch it out and publicly admit that the DRM was a stupid idea and that they owe the PC gaming public a huge apology. Then I can hand over my cash and play it. I really hope this will make them completely remove plans to implment this DRM with Splinter Cell:Conviction.

I agree with @icehearted and @commasplice; I hate the Steam system. Sure, you can use Offline mode...if Steam feels like it. I swear, EVERY time my internet has gone down unexpectedly, Steam absolutely refused to function in offline mode.

Also, there's the fact that sometimes Steam likes to start patching the game I want to play, so I have to wait for it to finish. Or, if something happens to my connection during the patching process, then I'm shit outta luck...I can't play a partially-patched game in offline mode.

Steam is also responsible for me pirating my very first game: Half-Life 2. I bought the game while I was in the military, and I didn't have an internet connection in the barracks. So, there I was with my brand new laptop and freshly purchased copy of HL2, and I pop it in the drive to install it...and no joy. You needed an internet connection to play.

There was supposedly a phone registration option, but the half dozen times I tried it (over two days) it was either busy, or didn't ring at all. That falls into the category of "Go fuck yourself, Steam". Luckily, my roommate had had a pirated copy for TWO WEEKS. He burned me a copy so I could play the game I had already purchased.

Here's the rule of thumb for DRM: If it's easier to pirate a game than to purchase it legitimately, then people are more likely to pirate it. If purchasing a game is simply a matter of popping a DVD in the drive, installing it, and playing...then people will probably do that...especially if installing the game ONLY INSTALLS THE GAME. When I purchase a game, it's not a free license for the devs to set up shop on my computer and install whatever crazy shit they feel like.

A DRM system like the one UbiSoft was failing with isn't even the pinnacle of inconvenient...but it's getting there. I don't normally like to see companies fail, since there are undoubtedly many good people there who would lose income for a decision they had no part in. However, the only way an industry will learn a lesson is if they see one of their number fall flat on its face due to an absurdly stupid decision.

I hope UbiSoft loses enough money to become a cautionary tail for the rest of the industry...but that won't happen, so I'm going to go play some DRM-free games from GoG, because that's how I roll.

dochmbi:

Amnestic:
It's just a little bit embarassing at this point.

Meanwhile, pirates (I assume) get to play their cracked version without issue. Nice job Ubisoft, really.

Not so. AC 2 hasn't been cracked yet, don't know how long it will take.

AC2 HAS been craccked, and has been for a few days now.

7ru7h:

Sajuuk-khar:
Although if you want me to judge: piracy is theft. I'm not one of those PC gaming is dead guys, but it used to be that we got a whole lot more specifically for PC designed games instead of mostly ports. The "ZOMG!!! WE MUST STOP THEM!1!1" part is completely understandable, however ofcourse a piece of DRM that's harsh, annoying, unreliable and doesn't even work is completely pointless and only serves to annoy paying customers.

It is completely understandable? Not at all. How is it understandable for a company to willingly nerf their product to the point that it is basically unusable for paying customers, yet the people who steal it are in the clear?

"Sure, buy our product, but it may not work sometimes if stuff happens. But don't listen to those people who 'stole' it and say they can use it just fine. They are just liars and we know it doesn't work."

You're not reading. It isn't understandable at all that developers and publishers try to prevent piracy right?

Antari:
The days when CD Key's didn't exist is still fresh in my mind. But unfortunately they will never take what they see to be a step backwards. Its picking the lesser of two evils. If the industry goes completely nuts I'll just play old games and stay away from new stuff entirely. At best Ubisoft will tone the current DRM down, but unless people stop buying their games, they will continue to think they've done a great job.

Sad, but true. I think it's kind of ironic how so much in the video game industry is based around at least pretending to listen to what gamers ask for, but often, it seems like we're just ignored.

"Yeah, this time around in Random Shooter 3, we brought back that fan-favorite weapon from RS1 that we left out of RS2. The users have been clamoring for it since RS2 was announced and we thought we'd throw a little nod their way."
"Okay, but did you fix any of the problems with the DRM that more or less made your game unplayable for millions of people? What about the unbalanced class system in RS2? Any change there? You also took out LAN support and dedicated servers, which were big draws for the first two games. Who exactly have you been listening to? Do you actually know anyone that's played your games?"

DarkSaber:

dochmbi:

Amnestic:
It's just a little bit embarassing at this point.

Meanwhile, pirates (I assume) get to play their cracked version without issue. Nice job Ubisoft, really.

Not so. AC 2 hasn't been cracked yet, don't know how long it will take.

AC2 HAS been craccked, and has been for a few days now.

AFAIK, the current "crack" allows you to start the game, but you can't accept missions, so the crack isn't complete.

7ru7h:

Sajuuk-khar:

7ru7h:
People always want something for free. In the software world, it is a FACT OF LIFE that someone will find a way to use your product without paying. You can throw up every barrier you can think of and program and it wont stop some people. Piracy happens, and you can either say "Fuck it, they aren't our real customers" and just accept the fact or "ZOMG!!! WE MUST STOP THEM!1!1" and start implementing malicious bits of code that don't stop the problem and hurt your customers. Unfortunately, most of the gaming world has decided to go the latter route. Because that can't go wrong, amirite?

Can you honestly tell me that instituting practices that harm the people that buy your products is a good thing, and doesn't push more people to less reputable means of using your products?

Hey I wasn't judging. It's just that the argument that this is why piracy exists is based on nothing. Sure some people pirate because of this stuff, but piracy didn't start existing because of DRM.

That may not have been the way it started, but it sure as hell increases the problem and brings it into the common knowledge. I mean think about it. When they first started doing this shit, they said that they had to stop those people who were playing without paying, and if you got inconvenienced, you were much more likely to look into it, and probably spread the idea.

Although if you want me to judge: piracy is theft. I'm not one of those PC gaming is dead guys, but it used to be that we got a whole lot more specifically for PC designed games instead of mostly ports. The "ZOMG!!! WE MUST STOP THEM!1!1" part is completely understandable, however ofcourse a piece of DRM that's harsh, annoying, unreliable and doesn't even work is completely pointless and only serves to annoy paying customers.

It is completely understandable? Not at all. How is it understandable for a company to willingly nerf their product to the point that it is basically unusable for paying customers, yet the people who steal it are in the clear?

"Sure, buy our product, but it may not work sometimes if stuff happens. But don't listen to those people who 'stole' it and say they can use it just fine. They are just liars and we know it doesn't work."

I personally can see both sides of the story. Yes, piracy is harmful to a company's profit, obviously. And there's nothing wrong with trying to stop them.

HOWEVER

There are limits. Once your customers start becoming inconvenienced, then you have a problem. And Ubisoft now has a problem. Legitimate, paying customers are not being rewarded for paying for the legitimate product. And even if there is no cracked version of a game yet, there soon shall be, and then the pirates shall be the only ones truly enjoying the game.

So yes, I don't exactly support piracy constantly, but this is one of those times where even I change my mind.

Icehearted:
Devil's advocate:
Valve had a similar problem with their Steam service (which I hate beyond all human comprehension) and it's still extremely popular. Bioshock, I forget exactly what happened with it, but there was something going on that made the game unplayable for paying customers. Had to do with unlocking it or something.

XBLA, Steam, Ubisoft's authentication is nothing new. Yes, I realize that the former two are supposed to be more about digital distribution and not DRM, but I defer to that Bioshock incident as an example of how Ubisoft and Steam are not all that dissimilar in certain functions.

Frankly, I hate them all in ways I cannot possibly articulate, but if that's what people want, then who am I to argue?

From what I recall, Steam never actually went completely down. It was the download servers that had a huge amount of traffic, meaning it just took longer to download the games. Otherwise people were still able to play their games. I was lucky since I used the Steam beta and already had all my games transferred.

I also recall a feature to convert old HL1 games to Steam, anyways, don't compare a failure like this to Steam. Considering the fact that Steam started almost a decade ago, you can't say they didn't deal with their problems quickly. The only time Steam had problems afterwards was for Half-Life 2's release. Beyond that Steam has been perfectly stable during all major title releases.

Loki424:
I agree with @icehearted and @commasplice; I hate the Steam system. Sure, you can use Offline mode...if Steam feels like it. I swear, EVERY time my internet has gone down unexpectedly, Steam absolutely refused to function in offline mode.

Also, there's the fact that sometimes Steam likes to start patching the game I want to play, so I have to wait for it to finish. Or, if something happens to my connection during the patching process, then I'm shit outta luck...I can't play a partially-patched game in offline mode.

Steam is also responsible for me pirating my very first game: Half-Life 2. I bought the game while I was in the military, and I didn't have an internet connection in the barracks. So, there I was with my brand new laptop and freshly purchased copy of HL2, and I pop it in the drive to install it...and no joy. You needed an internet connection to play.

There was supposedly a phone registration option, but the half dozen times I tried it (over two days) it was either busy, or didn't ring at all. That falls into the category of "Go fuck yourself, Steam". Luckily, my roommate had had a pirated copy for TWO WEEKS. He burned me a copy so I could play the game I had already purchased.

Here's the rule of thumb for DRM: If it's easier to pirate a game than to purchase it legitimately, then people are more likely to pirate it. If purchasing a game is simply a matter of popping a DVD in the drive, installing it, and playing...then people will probably do that...especially if installing the game ONLY INSTALLS THE GAME. When I purchase a game, it's not a free license for the devs to set up shop on my computer and install whatever crazy shit they feel like.

A DRM system like the one UbiSoft was failing with isn't even the pinnacle of inconvenient...but it's getting there. I don't normally like to see companies fail, since there are undoubtedly many good people there who would lose income for a decision they had no part in. However, the only way an industry will learn a lesson is if they see one of their number fall flat on its face due to an absurdly stupid decision.

I hope UbiSoft loses enough money to become a cautionary tail for the rest of the industry...but that won't happen, so I'm going to go play some DRM-free games from GoG, because that's how I roll.

Ya I won't defend steam on the customer service issue, they aren't the easiest people to get ahold of at the best of times. But when things are working, its not too bad.

We all knew this would happen. The same reason why thousands of fans tried to speak out against Ubisoft's plan with a simple message of "Use Steam instead, you idiots." Okay, so I added the "you idiots" part, but let's be honest, it's needed.

It's a sign Ubisoft... your DRM is destined to fail, muahahaha!!

Who would have thought that a massive server bank could ever go offline? Who would have thought that when severs only exist to VERIFY you're talking to the game that an incredibly simple man in the middle attack with simple packet crafting would trick the game to thinking it's talking to the sever? A fucking high school student could fool this system.

Jennacide:
We all knew this would happen. The same reason why thousands of fans tried to speak out against Ubisoft's plan with a simple message of "Use Steam instead, you idiots." Okay, so I added the "you idiots" part, but let's be honest, it's needed.

I believe Ubi was quoted saying that "Steam isn't effective enough in combatting piracy," which blew my mind. I can't remember the exact quote but it was a giant slap in the face of Steam in general.

I say blame the shareholders and people who okayed this. It's their fault and they deserve to lose money to the pirates.

it's just like games made in the 80's and 90's. you had every right to blame the morons who made them because, oh I don't know, TESTING THEM before letting them come out wouldn't have cost too much.

Same applies here. You have to test the DRM before putting it in your products. Otherwise this happens.

Antari:
Ya I won't defend steam on the customer service issue, they aren't the easiest people to get ahold of at the best of times. But when things are working, its not too bad.

Hey man, like I said, this could all be a lot worse. At least Valve and Ubisoft aren't fucking Nexon. You want to talk about bad customer service, ask any Mabinogi vet about the handling of the duping fiasco last year. I don't know if things have changed since then, but they didn't have anyone moderating the Mabi servers over the weekends, so when information about the duping glitch hit the forums one Friday, the shit hit the fan hard. Nexon's response was to let people print money like they were Wall Street execs during the Rapture for a full two and a half days, then arbitrarily ban a couple thousand people after the fact. Best part is another glitch came to light a week later and they didn't even ban anyone for THAT.

And you know what? When it happened, people were more surprised at the fact that they banned anyone at all than the fact that they seemed to have just picked account names out of a hat. That's how bad Nexon's customer service had been up to that point.

I wish i was surprised about this but i am not

Pendragon9:
I say blame the shareholders and people who okayed this. It's their fault and they deserve to lose money to the pirates.

it's just like games made in the 80's and 90's. you had every right to blame the morons who made them because, oh I don't know, TESTING THEM before letting them come out wouldn't have cost too much.

Same applies here. You have to test the DRM before putting it in your products. Otherwise this happens.

You know what the sad bit is, though? If Ubisoft does lose a fuckton of money over this, it's not the rich guys up at the top that OK'd it that are going to suffer. It's poor John D. Veloper down at the bottom that spends his nights writing code that's going to get fired because of the resulting cutbacks.

Wow never saw this coming.

Also I TOLD YOU SO I TOLD YOU SO! NA NA NA NA

Pendragon9:
I say blame the shareholders and people who okayed this. It's their fault and they deserve to lose money to the pirates.

Of course it's their fault. Problem lies in the fact that 99% of all these shareholders, CEOs and higher-ups are completely out of touch when it comes to gamers and only see things from a business point of view, THAT's why they don't understand that crap like this simply doesn't work... especially when it's arbitrarily imposed on paying customers.

Edit: Cool doublepost, me. :/

There! You see Ubisoft? We were right. You guys are idiots. My god, I may have to pirate this game just so I can actually play it. I'd rather pirate than pay for a game I can only play when the servers are actually working. And there's just going to be more and more people on these servers.

And that's why I don't buy games with shitty DRM

Amnestic:
It's just a little bit embarassing at this point.

Meanwhile, pirates (I assume) get to play their cracked version without issue. Nice job Ubisoft, really.

Of course they do, they got to play their games before the game was released and with no install limits.

There's a very simple fix, everyone who has paid for the game, go pirate it and play the unfettered version without the fuckery attached.

After all, are you not legally allowed to make one copy for your own backup needs?

I really can't see them actively hunting down their own customers for downloading their game after buying it.

Note I'm not advocating piracy (even tho I have done before), but once you've paid, I think you're entitled to do whatever you like to enjoy what you've paid for.

Breaking News, Assassin's 3 found to have anthrax inside the case of every retail copy, and the leaked version on torrent sites found to have a code for a free pizza at Dominos!

An Ubisoft rep made the statement 'The anthrax was to prevent shoplifters and the free pizza is to make those who would steal our product overweight and less attractive, hopefully leading to less pirates in the next generation.'

Industry leaders are unanimous in praising this form of DRM as an overwhelming success.

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here