Ubisoft Planning Its Own "Project Ten Dollar"

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Ubisoft Planning Its Own "Project Ten Dollar"

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Ubisoft says it is taking a close look at EA's Project Ten Dollar DLC program and will likely launch a similar initiative of its own in the near future.

In a call to investors following the announcement of its full-year financial results, Ubisoft CFO Alain Martinez said the company was going to start taking advantage of launch-day downloadable content in order to protect itself from losses incurred via used game sales, much as Electronic Arts has done with Project Ten Dollar and the new EA Sports equivalent Online Pass.

"Most of the games that we release next year will have from the start downloadable content available," Martinez said. "And we are looking very carefully at what is being done by EA regarding what we call the 'ten dollar solution' and we would probably follow that line at some time in the future."

Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot noted that the company had already laid the groundwork for such a system, pointing out that games like the hit Assassin's Creed 2 came with codes for bonus content. "Actually, we have been using keys starting last year on our products, so those keys were allowing some consumers to have the content if they were buying in specific stores," he said. "So we have the system in place to actually generate more revenue on the second hand market, so we are building now the content to make sure that it can be beneficial for both groups."

Project Ten Dollar has churned up some controversy among gamers, although most seem happy enough to be getting free stuff in exchange for buying new copies of games rather than used, but EA recently indicated that the program appeared to be a success. More than 70 percent of Mass Effect 2, Dragon Age: Origins and Battlefield: Bad Company 2 buyers went online to redeem their bonus DLC codes, the company said last week, while those who bought codes for used game purchases represented a "low single-digit percentage."

Source: GamesIndustry

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Well, its certainly proved to be popular so not a surprise others are jumping on the bandwagon.

Was just a matter of time

Is a two year old in charge of ubisoft or a deaf person or something?

Hooray! Free DLC!

Calumon: At least Ubi have something right.

I'm pretty sure the one DLC that every Ubisoft customer wants is the "deactivate DRM" DLC.

Anything short of that won't save them.

Compared to their previous DRM attempt, Project Ten Dollar is nothing but good.

I give a tentative thumbs-up.

Hurr Durr Derp - You say that like they're going to stop using their DRM. Project Ten Dollar isn't DRM, it's an attempt to kill used game sales.

i give a tentative kiss my arse ubi. i don't want your halfarse dlc anyway so ima be buying used still...so long as i get a good price and they don't have half a billion stickers glued to the case gah i hate when they ruin the case art

First EA, now Ubisoft. Next up: Activision, though we all would know they'd take it to tyrannical levels.

Hey Ubisoft, get this:

I'LL BUY YOUR MOTHERFUCKING GAMES AGAIN ONCE YOU REMOVE THE MALWARE FROM THEM.

Hell, I'm all for these "project ten dollar" initiatives. Reward the legitimate player, don't punish them. But I'll go further: I'll happily buy your games again (AC2 at least, maybe Conviction...) once you remove that piece of malfunctioning and torturous shit you call your own DRM.

Jack and Calumon:
Hooray! Free DLC!

Calumon: At least Ubi have something right.

True, but is that really saying all that much considering certain other stuff Ubisoft's done that most certainly isn't right?

Darktau:
Is a two year old in charge of ubisoft or a deaf person or something?

You should know by now that the corporate gaming world runs on this kind of monkey-see-monkey-do behavior.

I also don't see how being deaf impairs judgment here, unless you are insinuating loss of hearing equates to mental deficiency. Maybe in terms of ignoring what some people have said about Project Ten Dollar, but again it's corporate gaming.

Andy Chalk:
buyers went online to redeem their bonus DLC codes, the company said last week, while those who bought codes for used game purchases represented a "low single-digit percentage."

I doubt that the fact that few people bought the dlc you don't get as a used game buyer is an indicator that few people bought it used. Ea reads weird things into numbers.
Btw i downloaded the dlc via rapidshare because it was more convenient that using my download code for DA.
And I got on a 5 hour trip to the bank, just so i could pay for the humble indie bundle. But dam was it worth it. Check out Aquaria

Ubisoft, you are probaly 2nd worst publisher from Activision.

Fix your idiotic DRM meassures that make your games unplayable and THEN talk about offering first time purchases some incentives. Retards.

Well, I'm not a big fan of going after the second hand game market in general.

My concern is that with what they have done with their existing DRM, I'm afraid Ubisoft will do something like require a DLC code to download key parts of the game as opposed to additional content that might cost you a single character or whatever.

What's more I don't think I saw anything there about them giving up this "constant connection needed for single player games" DRM. This is something they apparently plan "in addition to" as opposed to "instead of".

It's interesting news, but not something I'm going to praise them for.

Personally, as a consumer I want all the game content on my disc, and to be able to freely access it without paying microtransactions. If a game is successful I don't mind buying an expansion or two down the road though. I do not want to see 10 tons of nickel and dime DLC either to add in a couple of weapons, or a new costume, or whatever. Expansions should both be fairly inexpensive given that they are digital (no packaging or shipping) and add signifigant content to what was already a complete gaming experience. I also believe I should be able to play my game offline, and even make archival backup copies if I so choose (this used to actually be encouraged).

Anything short of a complete about face from the industry, which I don't think is likely, isn't really good news from my perspective. The way I see it, even at the best, I have less control over/ownership of the games I'm paying good money for than I did back in like the 1980s with a Commodore 64.

Of the various things we've seen, "Project 10 dollar" was one of the less obnoxious ones, BUT people have also talked about how it could easily snowball into abuse. I'm very cynical when it comes to Ubisoft nowadays (for obvious reasons) and I have this uncanny feeling we're about to see a demonstration of the kinds of things people were concerned about when "Project 10 dollar" was first announced, and were told "was simply ridiculous paranoia".... hey, let's hope I'm wrong.

As it is, I'm passing on Ubisoft games on principle as long as they keep the current DRM system or something similarly problematic... so I guess to some extent this will have a minimal effect on me.

Ubisoft's Project 10-dollar: Make the buyer pay Ubisoft $10 for every minute of gameplay.

I think UBIsoft REALLY REALLY REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEAAALLY need to focus on their fucking games and not all the shit that goes along with them. As a great man once said

"If you build it. They will come."

Caliostro:
Hey Ubisoft, get this:

I'LL BUY YOUR MOTHERFUCKING GAMES AGAIN ONCE YOU REMOVE THE MALWARE FROM THEM.

Hell, I'm all for these "project ten dollar" initiatives. Reward the legitimate player, don't punish them. But I'll go further: I'll happily buy your games again (AC2 at least, maybe Conviction...) once you remove that piece of malfunctioning and torturous shit you call your own DRM.

What this magnificent ninja said.

I want to buy Assassin's Creed 2, I want to buy Conviction, but as long as you have such a hilariously infective DLC that punishes paying users I won't even touch them.

I don't care how much free shit you offer, I will not buy until they get rid of the DRM.

Once they do remove it I will gladly go to the store the next day and pick up AC2 and Conviction.

Caliostro:
Hey Ubisoft, get this:

I'LL BUY YOUR MOTHERFUCKING GAMES AGAIN ONCE YOU REMOVE THE MALWARE FROM THEM.

Hell, I'm all for these "project ten dollar" initiatives. Reward the legitimate player, don't punish them. But I'll go further: I'll happily buy your games again (AC2 at least, maybe Conviction...) once you remove that piece of malfunctioning and torturous shit you call your own DRM.

This is so true. I was about to post something similar, but not as subtle.

I have avoided purchasing two games from Ubi so far (Silent Hunter 5, SC:Conviction) simply because of the DRM. I would hate for this to continue, given they seem to have some talented PC developers on board.

EA: Project 10 dollar.
Ubi: Project 10 dollar per month plus proof of ID to be kept on file and if you stop paying you have to stop playing your games since the "licence" expires.
Activision: Project 25 dollar, and I quote "because we can".

DeadlyYellow:

You should know by now that the corporate gaming world runs on this kind of monkey-see-monkey-do behavior.

EA wants to copy Ubisoft's "Big Brother" DRM, and Ubisoft wants to copy EA's "Project 10 Dollar".
Monkey-see-monkey-do indeed.

Konrad Curze:
EA: Project 10 dollar.
Ubi: Project 10 dollar per month plus proof of ID to be kept on file and if you stop paying you have to stop playing your games since the "licence" expires.
Activision: Project 25 dollar, and I quote "because we can".

My thoughts exactly.

Also, Project $10 would be much more substantial if the DLC that came with the games had any substance. I mean, Dragon Age's DLC was okay at best.

EDIT: Ohh, and welcome to the Escapist.

The DLC has to be worth it, otherwise people will just pirate the game and ignore the crappy palette swap costumes you would get for free.

Wow, if every major game company takes this tactic, maybe the "scurge" of used game sales will vanish. Personally, I don't really care about used games anymore because I no longer want them after a bad experience with a scratched disc that a Gamestop employee would not recognize as a preexisting problem, rendering my bought game useless and unable to get my money back without selling the game for 1/20th of its actual value.

Really, though, if this is such a problem, they should be pushing for the elimination of used games instead of getting angry at game stores for this and ripping off the consumer when the game stores are the ones to blame for these problems. They should cut the problem off at its source instead of punishing the middleman for taking up the store's endless offers to sell them these used games.

!@$%^&

Ya see what EA started? Technically, they're within their rights since online access to their servers and content belongs to them, but it still sucks. This is where "vote with your wallet" needs to go into effect. It'll give them a very loud message about what gamers think of "Project $10."

The sad thing is that these types of tactics will be huge successes. Mainly because I've seen over and over that people will complain about giving their money for something yet still do it anyway.

As a PC gamer, it's nice to see Tradition spread.

That said: Ubisoft! Get rid of that failure of a DRM! Then we'll talk.

The biggest problem is that you all don't have a stable internet connection? Or is this a pirate thing?

How about we complain about the internet providers/company when they fail at offering constant server use? I know it is lame to say more people than not have a home near places that the internet seems to work regularly, but seriously, maybe your internet provider is the reason you all fail to be able to play games that require online connections?

Don't the games (I heard a recent PS3 game didn't) generally let you know you need a connection to the internet?

Why all the bitching and complaining when devs try to stop pirates?

I think the EA, pay for online multiplayer if you buy a used game, is a great idea. Hell, I say make every copy of every game sold require a code for initial use. If the game is sold used, let a new fee be added for those who don't want to pay for a game directly to the company that makes it.

Bottom line: Buy a game new, pay for an internet connection, suffer through this new time line of weak internet connections. Pirates are thieves, and this is how they will be fought.

Cry, cry you people who can't afford games. This thing called gaming is for people who have the ability to pay to play. If you don't have the ability legally, then maybe you should have a new hobby.

It's funny because anyone who wants to yell at me, has internet access, and so they should be able to play any of these games if they pay for them.

If you seriously can't fly with that thing called the internet, get a console, and stop thinking just because you want to do something, doesn't mean you have a right to.

If any of you really can't play video games because of drm, I would love to have you explain exactly why not. Unless you are a pirate, then I have no desire to hear from you.

Hahaha ... carry on Ubisoft, first you have basically alienated every PC gamer fan you had, now you will do the same to your Console fans.

Whats this talk of FREE DLC ? There wont be FREE DLC idiots, the publishers will simply cut off a piece of the existing game... and make that 'FREE DLC', not add stuff to the game.
Thats why the concept of DLC is unpleasant, while it may imply adding to the game in reality its removing and selling seperately because unlike traditional expansions, modern games are designed with the idea of selling DLC so 'additonal extras' are simply cut from the game and re-introduced as DLC.

... quiet often the content is already on the machine, the buyer merely purchases a key to unlock it.

I'm not really sure whether you're trolling on purpose here.

Sober Thal:

It's funny because anyone who wants to yell at me, has internet access, and so they should be able to play any of these games if they pay for them.

Except they might not. They might be posting this from libraries, netcafes and other places that offer internet access. Their internet connection might be really slow. Not everybody lives in a western country near a metropolis.

The thing is that you'll never have 100% working internet access at all times. It's simply impossible. That's why it's reasonable to assume to that games/apps/whatever that wouldn't otherwise require a connection don't.

If any of you really can't play video games because of drm, I would love to have you explain exactly why not. Unless you are a pirate, then I have no desire to hear from you.

There are plenty of games I couldn't play because of DRM. Heroes of Annihilated Empires was such a game, Brothers in Arms was another. They simply didn't start. At one point I was so annoyed by Starforce that I simply stopped buying any game that had it; I had 3 games at that point with that DRM that simply wouldn't boot up. If you bought Assassin's Creed 2 while their servers were down, you couldn't play that legally either.

Fact is, pirates aren't the ones that are screwed over by DRM. They'll simply crack their game and play that cracked version that has no DRM from that point onward.

But that isn't even close to what Project Ten Dollar is about, anyway.

Project Ten Dollar is essentially what everyone was afraid of when developers started selling chunks of their game online.

Sure they can do this and probably a decent idea but it doesn't mean they'll get any money from me. UBISOFT is dead to me.

Caliostro:
Hey Ubisoft, get this:

I'LL BUY YOUR MOTHERFUCKING GAMES AGAIN ONCE YOU REMOVE THE MALWARE FROM THEM.

Hell, I'm all for these "project ten dollar" initiatives. Reward the legitimate player, don't punish them. But I'll go further: I'll happily buy your games again (AC2 at least, maybe Conviction...) once you remove that piece of malfunctioning and torturous shit you call your own DRM.

I agree with the DRM thing, but umm... Legitimate player? Because I buy used games I'm not a legitimate player?

While I have nothing against buying used games, in fact I am quite a purchaser myself when I go looking for the oldies, I like the way this 'Project 10 dollar' is going. It seems by far the best incentive/idea to have gamers purchase their games new.

ASnogarD:
Hahaha ... carry on Ubisoft, first you have basically alienated every PC gamer fan you had, now you will do the same to your Console fans.

Whats this talk of FREE DLC ? There wont be FREE DLC idiots, the publishers will simply cut off a piece of the existing game... and make that 'FREE DLC', not add stuff to the game.
Thats why the concept of DLC is unpleasant, while it may imply adding to the game in reality its removing and selling seperately because unlike traditional expansions, modern games are designed with the idea of selling DLC so 'additonal extras' are simply cut from the game and re-introduced as DLC.

... quiet often the content is already on the machine, the buyer merely purchases a key to unlock it.

Did you by any chance see the DLC for dante's inferno? The trophies of the FUTURE dlc were already amonngst the original 1.0 game, and that was with 3 dlc's "on the way"
Fucking absurd... not only that but the game sucks big floppy donkey dicks.

edit: is it just me that thinks that the one for battlefield: bc2 was actually quite good? Sure, it would cost extra 15 bucks for someone buying the game used... but it's all the new maps for free and they plan on adding quite a bit more than it already had. Even if most of them are the same ones mirrored, expanded, changed so they work for other modes, its still quite decent.

When you have game content ready at launch and not pack it with the game it's just evil money grubbing...
Sure your day-one purchase code get's you some "additional" content, but I bet they didn't include a lot more content to sell to EVERYONE in a few weeks!

DLC should be used only to get great games a second life like 6 months later, not this.

Besides; most used games sell for a lot LESS than -10$ original price, thank goodness!

You people are far too forgiving. I won't touch any crap that comes out of Ubisoft ever again. And I'm keeping track of the people involving in the company if they decide to start a new one. I will never give them any money ever again.

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