Insane Physics Engine Will Blow Your Mind With Dirt

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Insane Physics Engine Will Blow Your Mind With Dirt

Move over, Havok and PhysX. The Lagoa Multiphysics engine is in town, and it brings with it stunningly realistic dirt (and melting bunny rabbits).

When you get down to it, physics engines are really just a way to make the things that don't matter in a game look extra pretty. Unless you're the kind of gamer who actively looks for it, you're not going to be paying attention to the realistic way the curtains waft in the breeze while you dive through them firing madly at your enemies.

But that doesn't stop the above video from being jaw-droppingly spectacular. From the way the dirt breaks on the edge and the layers of cloth sliding off a ball, to the water splashing into a container and the bunnies melting in some rather disturbing imagery, this may well be the most insanely impressive physics engine I have ever seen.

I'm not going to pretend I know much about physics engines. I don't know how this works. For all I know it has a bunch of tiny little gnomes inside the code actually turning heat lamps onto chocolate rabbits - it's purely awe-inspiring through and through.

Honestly, I don't know what sort of gaming applications Thiago Costa's physics engine will have with its "high friction granular materials, incompressible fluids, elastic structures, plastic deformations and more." I do know that I'd gladly shell out $15 on Steam to just play a game where I threw dirt (and other assorted objects) at a wall.

Somebody make it happen? Please?

(Via CrunchGear)

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Neat, but what can this engine actually do in real time?

That looks amazing, but as BloodSquirrel said, what can it do in real time?

That looks like it would be a devil to process in real time on anything other than a top of the line rig. The frame-rate on an older or lower spec computer would be atrociouis.
Still amazing though, hope this manages to get some use somewhere.

This is awesome looking.

Thats is impressice! Now...lets see it implemented in something other than a tech demo!

Ooo very pretty.

This could be used for terrain deformation in a game! Like Fracture 2, if it ever exists.

Nick of Blades:
That looks amazing, but as BloodSquirrel said, what can it do in real time?

By the looks of it (at about 2:00 mins in) it can, although i think some of the bigger bits are rendered to hide any FPS lag.

I am fairly impressed.

Didn't like the rabbits being squishied and thrown around tho ._.

Lol, someone will make a game with this that nobody can run. But it will be awesome.

Very impressive!

Although I don't think it will be a graphics cards best friend

*brain explodes in epicness*

Amazing. While you're right that it's mostly used just to make pretty games look more pretty. Some games could actually have some use for it. Maybe when Little Big Planet 3 comes out, they might use this, and then some creative persons can figure out how to use it properly.

DAYMMMM! That's an impressive physics engine! I'm sure it's the unknown offspring of the CryENGINE meaning it'll beat the hell outta your graphics card.
I suspect that this engine will be used almost exclusively for movies as rendering that in real time would be a bitch and a half.
Christ I can't wait to get out of college so I can use real engines instead of having to make my own.

That was amazing.
Seriously, get to stream-lining that code and put that in games. Right now.
The dirt alone was just epic. Can you imagine a beach-storming level where the dirt is flying, craters are being formed realistically with clumps whizzing past your face? Sweet merciful cheese on a stick in an oven...sign me up.

BloodSquirrel:
Neat, but what can this engine actually do in real time?

Think of what we had say... fifteen years ago.


That's a tech demo for the PS1. As in, "Look at what our hardware can do!" demo.

I think we all know that we're going to be getting this kinda technology relatively soon.
And it will be Sweet.

Wow, impressive. My computer cries just watching that.

Sega Rally Revo 2 with this engine. NOW!

Well, the question is, how many flips can I make someone do when I shoot them in the face?

Think about the important things, here.

Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet

I will soon MELT ZE BUNNIES! MUVAHAHAHA!

That is really cool. That was realistic as hell. And i love to watch in-game physics effects, the only problem being that my PC can't run current-gen games. Yeah, I'd wish I'd have computer that could play games with such engines.
Poor little bunnies.

Erana:

Think of what we had say... fifteen years ago.

I think we all know that we're going to be getting this kinda technology relatively soon.
And it will be Sweet.

Computer technology isn't improving nearly as fast as it was 15 years ago (I also wouldn't call 15 years "relatively soon" for the video game industry). Something like this may require a major technological leap, such as moving beyond silicon.

1:45 Giggle FX?

I like it, I want to see some of those examples in game. Maybe a giant statue of a bunny rabbit turn to dust?

hazabaza1:
Well, the question is, how many flips can I make someone do when I shoot them in the face?

Think about the important things, here.

I belive that was answered in the article, it is up to the Gnomes living in the code.

You know the part were the rabbit melted into the floor? My brain looked like that at the end of the video.

why do they hate the rabbits so

........ I need new pants. I've never been so blown away and downright excited over what could be possible with this technology and the coding behind it. Sorry, guys.

BloodSquirrel:

Erana:

Think of what we had say... fifteen years ago.

I think we all know that we're going to be getting this kinda technology relatively soon.
And it will be Sweet.

Computer technology isn't improving nearly as fast as it was 15 years ago (I also wouldn't call 15 years "relatively soon" for the video game industry). Something like this may require a major technological leap, such as moving beyond silicon.

theyre actually thinking about using diamonds for chips rather than silicon

Wow. That's one hell of a good start. Get this to run realtime and then add Euphoria and you have a platform to make a beautifully realistic game.

Lets see someone put this too good use. Like I don't know... Steven Seagals dirt adventure.

Actually if they put this into a body imagine the violence...

Most of that stuff is probably in real time, in terms of simulation. The rendering might have taken a while though. That was all done in Softimage, and it seems reasonably easy to use. However since it's using Softimage I suspect it uses ICE, which may not necessarily useful for games necessarily. But hopefully it doesn't run off ICE and can be used in any platform. Still, good to see something besides HAVOC for a change.

Shoot someone with a "GEL Gun". They turn to gel and melt.

Imagine the FATALITY's!

Oh and boobs with now wiggle with such precision that teenagers will never again leave the house.

:)

CLOTH PHYSICS!!!! Really, we need those to improve quite a bit as the biggest issues with heavy rain's graphics was when people took their shirts off the shirt stopped making sense.

Wow, imagine a game where the enemies turn to dust when you kill them.

And those cloth physics were unbelievable. Shame my laptop can barely run flash games at a decent FPS.

BloodSquirrel:
Computer technology isn't improving nearly as fast as it was 15 years ago (I also wouldn't call 15 years "relatively soon" for the video game industry).

In terms of speeding up individual cores/threads/processes, that's true, but for highly parallel stuff, which physics processing of this sort very much so is, things are advancing very quickly, particularly for more specialized processors. Modern video cards are absurdly fast at doing certain specific things, including simulations like this, and they continue to get even more so in a hurry. The problem is that programming for them is currently a huge pain in the ass, not a lot of stuff is standardized or consistent between systems, most people don't have new/fancy enough hardware to take advantage of it (which is why physics engines are generally just used to make stuff pretty and not for anything required for gameplay), and it cuts into your video rendering power if you're not doing it on a separate card. If that all gets sorted out, any remaining problems certainly won't be because of a lack of tech advancing quickly enough, at least in this particular area at the moment.

Looks really nice, although I very much doubt that this will be used in computer games.

Unless you want the infamous "Crysis" situation from a few years ago, times one thousand.

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