DotA Trash-Talking Results in Real-Life Beatdown

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DotA Trash-Talking Results in Real-Life Beatdown

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A teenager in Vancouver has learned a valuable life lesson after a group of fellow gamers, tired of his DotA trash-talking, tracked him down at school and broke his fingers.

Vancouver police are investigating an incident in which a student at Eric Hamber Secondary School in Vancouver, British Columbia, was attacked and beaten during his lunch hour on Monday. The assault was apparently sparked by trash-talking during a game of Defense of the Ancients, a popular Warcraft 3 custom scenario, in which the victim and some friends soundly trounced their opponents.

The attackers, described as a group of four or five males in their "late teens," located the victim at his school, where they made him kiss their feet before they went to work on him with "batons" of some sort, breaking his fingers.

"I guess some people take these things exceptionally seriously," said Constable Lindsey Houghton of the Vancouver Police. "It's something that is exceptionally rare, given the number of people who play videogames. Most people can separate reality from online fiction."

Computer science professor emeritus Robert Rosenberg, however, said he wasn't surprised by the assault, noting that real-life incidents stemming from online encounters are becoming increasingly common. "There are some emotions that seem to be amplified in the online world," he said. "Things that happen on the Internet that affect your status can be very serious."

For the record, I don't condone violence, especially not over something as insignificant as winning or losing a videogame. That said, I think maybe it's time to review one of the easy-to-remember yet ever-so-useful rules for good living, both online and off: If you're about to say something to someone online that would get you punched in the mouth if you said it to their face, don't say it.

The Vancouver Police Youth Squad is investigating the attack but thus far, no arrests have been made.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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On one hand, I, like you, don't agree with people getting violent over a game.

However on the other hand, I, and pretty much everyone else, would gladly do this to all the little trash-talking pricks on xbox live if we got the chance.

Remember kids, if you say something that would get you in trouble in real life, its better to not say it.

There is being violent and stabbing someone in weird passion, and then there is getting a group of thugs to force someone to kiss your feet before crippling him. The first shows someone mentally unstable, the latter shows a criminal sociopath.

So kids! Be sure to try out the upcoming Valve and Blizzard DotA games!

Ouch.

Wow, that's a bit extreme, don't you find?

I mean, if they ridiculed him and left it at that, would've been an awesome story, but instead, broken fingers?

Ouch again.

Irridium:
On one hand, I, like you, don't agree with people getting violent over a game.

However on the other hand, I, and pretty much everyone else, would gladly do this to all the little trash-talking pricks on xbox live if we got the chance.

Remember kids, if you say something that would get you in trouble in real life, its better to not say it.

This was more or less what i was going to say.

Andy Chalk:
I think maybe it's time to review one of the easy-to-remember yet ever-so-useful rules for good living, both online and off: If you're about to say something to someone online that would get you punched in the mouth if you said it to their face, don't say it.

Awww, you stole what I was going to say.

Wow. So they didn't just turn their computers off and realize that there was more to life than a videogame? Pathetic. Fucking pathetic

Ugh, saw this in the local paper this morning and thought, "The CBC is going to blow this way out of proportion on the news". However, this is definitely not behaviour confined to video games, seeing as schools around here have already had problems with students writing lists of students they disliked and spreading nasty rumours through the internet, just because they feel security in anonymity. People act on those rumours and then we end up with vicious school beatings, or even worse, suicides. I think there does need to be better education that you are still accountable for what you do and say over the net, and that you are NOT shielded from the consequences of your actions.

Irridium:
On one hand, I, like you, don't agree with people getting violent over a game.

However on the other hand, I, and pretty much everyone else, would gladly do this to all the little trash-talking pricks on xbox live if we got the chance.

Remember kids, if you say something that would get you in trouble in real life, its better to not say it.

Pretty much this. It may be the most fucking overreactive to beat this kid down, but if he was really trash talking, it's partially his fault too.

But, then again, that's Vancouver. There's a reason I moved from there after spending most of my life in there. Everyone knows how to be violent, even the gameplayers.

They start swearing at peeps older and then they got beaten.... surprise?

I remember going to a tennis club as a 13 yo and laughing (over a 3 hour period)at a 16 yo because I could kick his ass at tennis. When I left the club he and a mate jumped me and kicked the crap out of me.

Life lesson learned. If you cant backup your shit... shut it, or they will.

Maybe this kid with the broken fingers will now keep his self to his self online. Course breaking fingers? bit mean...

I have absolutely no sympathy for the kid. The attackers are pretty pathetic though.

Also: "It's something that is exceptionally rare, given the number of people who play videogames. Most people can separate reality from online fiction." It makes me happy to hear the authorities saying this, as opposed to the normal "video games did this!"

Then again, the people in Vancouver are pretty relaxed and reasonable, in my experience. Except for DotA players apparently.

Andy Chalk:

"I guess some people take these things exceptionally seriously," said Constable Lindsey Houghton of the Vancouver Police. "It's something that is exceptionally rare, given the number of people who play videogames. Most people can separate reality from online fiction."

Wow, someone in a officer position actualy makes a good point, and not blaming everyone. There's hope. ._.

Huh. It seems more like "gang mentality" then video game rage. Which is bad.
That is, people, why you learn to protect yourself from hits, and how to shove people to the ground and run like a sissygirl.

How the hell did FOX news let this fly under the radar? Cannot wait to see them do with this what Viagra does to the average man...

Citrus Insanity:
Also: "It's something that is exceptionally rare, given the number of people who play videogames. Most people can separate reality from online fiction." It makes me happy to hear the authorities saying this, as opposed to the normal "video games did this!"

No joke!
When I saw that line, I totally forgot about the rest of the article! It seems someone in legal authority saying something like that is bigger news then some punk getting beat up by other punks over a video game!

More on topic: This is why I do my best to act online like I do in real life.
I just don't see the appeal of acting like a douche-bag online.
Anonymity or not, being an asshole isn't something I enjoy.

ZehGeek:

Andy Chalk:

"I guess some people take these things exceptionally seriously," said Constable Lindsey Houghton of the Vancouver Police. "It's something that is exceptionally rare, given the number of people who play videogames. Most people can separate reality from online fiction."

Wow, someone in a officer position actualy makes a good point, and not blaming everyone. There's hope. ._.

Oh yeah. Maybe he's being mind controlled by evil or something.

Double post. Ignore.

There was a flash animation about people leaving a Dota match before it started and the host tracked them down and forced them to play it... I guess it's was more exaggerated but it's the same concept...

Damn, wrong thread...

Wait, breaking fingers for trash talking? That's... completely insane. I'm all for more consequences for being a dick online, but that's waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too far.

Is it bad that I don't really feel that bad? I mean, I should, considering someone got their fingers broken over what essentially amounts to nothing.

But a little 'ha I kicked ur ass' doesn't send people into this kind of rage. This kid must have been running his mouth with the kind of shit that would get you thrown out a window in real life. It's shit like that that makes me pretty much never play an online game.

If we had the California Assembly Bill 1179, this wouldn't have happened.

I was bracing myself for the "It's the videogames fault/they're bad for our youth" line and was genuinely shocked that it didn't come.

Having said that, I'd like to hunt these guys down and give them a medal. They've done what almost all of us wish we'd had the balls to admit that we'd like to do: track down smug little shit-talking 12 year olds and break their goddamned fingers.

Real talk.

The_ModeRazor:

ZehGeek:

Andy Chalk:

"I guess some people take these things exceptionally seriously," said Constable Lindsey Houghton of the Vancouver Police. "It's something that is exceptionally rare, given the number of people who play videogames. Most people can separate reality from online fiction."

Wow, someone in a officer position actualy makes a good point, and not blaming everyone. There's hope. ._.

Oh yeah. Maybe he's being mind controlled by evil or something.

You never know. Something's going on though if she's saying something like that.

If you are not willing to take a punch to the face for what you say then is it worth saying?

We shall call it the DOTa test from now on.

In all seriouness, if you are someone who can't fight or lacks the skill of diplomacy you shouldn't talk shit, also, if you are the type of person who becomes filled with violent rage when some one makes fun of you, you probably shouldn't play multiplayer games. And if you even get the hint your child may track down a random stranger and assualt him with a pack of idiots you should probably have them sectioned.

Well, Karma is b.

Them nerds are so funny these days -__-

Jk jk, i think they over reacted, but the professor guy is right. I guess some people cant differ the real world to the game/ fake world...

Andy Chalk:
For the record, I don't condone violence, especially not over something as insignificant as winning or losing a videogame. That said, I think maybe it's time to review one of the easy-to-remember yet ever-so-useful rules for good living, both online and off: If you're about to say something to someone online that would get you punched in the mouth if you said it to their face, don't say it.

For the record, this statement explicitly condones and encourages violence. You are justifying face punching(violence) by claiming that some words are so powerful that their utterance it the same level of threat as physical force. And that people should cower in fear and censor themselves on the offchance some violent thug might be listening.

Wouldn't it be better to say "No matter what someone says it doesn't justify violence" Or the how about "The thugs that jumped the kid are chickenshits who couldn't handle losing a game, this act has proven that their penises are extremely tiny"?

Some people deserve a beating, because it's the only way they'll stop being arse holes; he didn't deserve to have his fingers broken though.

And kudos to the police for not blaming the games.

On one hand I think he deserved it on the other hand I'm just laughing.

The 'kissing the feet' bit is a bit creepy though. I mean either make him kiss the feet and get away with his loss of dignity or beat him without saying anything. Doing both is just weak. I normally woudln't approve of this, especially since they went too far and ganged up on him, but I guess he sort of deserved it in this case.

When reached for comment the victim said the attackers were "a group of spawn camping noobs" and speculated that they may have used "hacks".

Hey Blizzard, still think that "real-ID" for account holders is a good idea?

Andy Chalk:
For the record, I don't condone violence, especially not over something as insignificant as winning or losing a videogame. That said, I think maybe it's time to review one of the easy-to-remember yet ever-so-useful rules for good living, both online and off: If you're about to say something to someone online that would get you punched in the mouth if you said it to their face, don't say it.

And that is something to Grow On.

BACKTRACED!

Sorry, someone had to say it.

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