Homefront Novel Tells Story of Korea Invading U.S. in 2027

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Mackheath:
Huh. Considering the US could annihilate the North with a button this doesn't seem like the most realistic setting.

Still, I'll give it a chance and keep an eye out.

Well while the north is a strategicly small area, they have (to the best of my understanding) a vast network of public and private bomb shelters meant for just such an occasion. And the war-ready mindset of N. Korea just makes their forces all the harder to contend with.

OT: Looks like a decent book. Might pick it up, I just hope its not bursting at the seams with military bravado and sterotypes.

DannibalG36:
...Technologically, the gap between the Korean and US military is not especially large...

I'm sorry, WHAT? North Korean equipment is primarily composed of 1960's and 1950's Chinese supplied equipment. You do mention the more modern South Korean, and I will grant that they have a far closer technology level to the US than the North.

BUT:
1) If the North where to somehow successfully invade the South, they would have to defeat the forces using that equipment in the process, most likely destroying their equipment.
2) A political/diplomatic union is not what is being talked about in this fiction - its an invasion of the South by the North; if it where a diplomatic union, the democratic South has no quarrel with the US (in fact, the South is allied to the US), and it seems improbable to me they'd willingly join up with the dictatorship of the North and take on their quarrels as their own.
3) There is still a technology gap between the South and the US; the USA spends crazy amounts of cash on military R&D (to the point where its almost a public works program pretending to be a private industry, but thats a discussion for another thread); their technology is, frankly, the best in the world when it comes to warfare. Even allowing for the time gap, they'd have to do alot of catching up whilst at the same time going through a painful reunification process.

ArchAngelKira:
I'll be in Japan before it happpens. Have fun guys

Yeah cause the north wont role over Japan just to get even before taking on the US. But then again Japan will probably have mechas by that time.

Ahh, this reminds me of Armored Fury for BF2. I would take MEC or China any day over North Korea as a game enemy.

Did anyone else think that they were fighting mountain equipment co-op the first time they played BF2?

Doug:

DannibalG36:
...Technologically, the gap between the Korean and US military is not especially large...

I'm sorry, WHAT? North Korean equipment is primarily composed of 1960's and 1950's Chinese supplied equipment. You do mention the more modern South Korean, and I will grant that they have a far closer technology level to the US than the North.

BUT:
1) If the North where to somehow successfully invade the South, they would have to defeat the forces using that equipment in the process, most likely destroying their equipment.
2) A political/diplomatic union is not what is being talked about in this fiction - its an invasion of the South by the North; if it where a diplomatic union, the democratic South has no quarrel with the US (in fact, the South is allied to the US), and it seems improbable to me they'd willingly join up with the dictatorship of the North and take on their quarrels as their own.
3) There is still a technology gap between the South and the US; the USA spends crazy amounts of cash on military R&D (to the point where its almost a public works program pretending to be a private industry, but thats a discussion for another thread); their technology is, frankly, the best in the world when it comes to warfare. Even allowing for the time gap, they'd have to do alot of catching up whilst at the same time going through a painful reunification process.

Please actually watch the Homefront story trailer. In the Homefront fiction, South and North Korea unite diplomatically. There isn't even a mention of North invading South.

And never make the assumption that technology assures superiority over numbers and good tactics. Vietnam, anyone? Or, even better, observe the Millenium Challenge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millennium_Challenge_2002). Tactics will always trump even the most advanced technology.

There is an inverse relationship between the release of news for this game and my interest. As the details are fleshed out, the premise just seems exceptionally bland and too far-fetched. Within the span of the limited years, I don't see how even a North/South Korean Union could rise up to be so powerful without any contenders. China is a far more believable threat that would start an Eastern uprising because it has everything going in its favor compared to the Koreas. China already owns most of our debt and make 99% of what we buy, and they continue to grow as a global power.

I take the transmedia Homefront novel to be a caveat regarding the game's plot because it sounds like a possible excuse for an otherwise shallow explanation as to how the conflict arose. If so, the book could very well just be the sneaky way of jumping straight to the action for the game rather than show us much more than what the Homefront trailer depicted.

While Homefront is something relatively new when compared to Call of Duty or Medal of Honor by creating an alternate history, I cannot shake the memories of the awful Turning Point: Fall of Liberty and the relation to the write of Red Dawn equally causes my interest to further wane. I believe in another thread someone may have mentioned that it almost sounds as though Homefront was meant to have different invading enemy but switched to this Korean force. A part of me wonders if it was originally the Chinese, but then THQ realized that China sorta makes everything, including all of their games, boxes, and manuals to paperweights, staples, mousepads, dinner plates, cell phones, electrical wiring, ....

Sigh...

It just seems like another game that's is trying to sell on the whole "Fear of invasion" complex. Not to mention to revel under all the controversy it will generate (I guess games these days will pretty much do anything just to get some attention).

Look at the upcoming "Red Dawn" remake, now that's going to be a film that will be based on a "Chinese Invasion" and I kid you not will be filled to the brim with Chinese stereotypes but hidden under the flag of "satire".

Is anybody else worried that so much of the worlds entertainment still aim to capitalise and enforce American xenophobia?

But yeah, at least it's not the Russians this time....

DannibalG36:

Doug:

DannibalG36:
...Technologically, the gap between the Korean and US military is not especially large...

I'm sorry, WHAT? North Korean equipment is primarily composed of 1960's and 1950's Chinese supplied equipment. You do mention the more modern South Korean, and I will grant that they have a far closer technology level to the US than the North.

BUT:
1) If the North where to somehow successfully invade the South, they would have to defeat the forces using that equipment in the process, most likely destroying their equipment.
2) A political/diplomatic union is not what is being talked about in this fiction - its an invasion of the South by the North; if it where a diplomatic union, the democratic South has no quarrel with the US (in fact, the South is allied to the US), and it seems improbable to me they'd willingly join up with the dictatorship of the North and take on their quarrels as their own.
3) There is still a technology gap between the South and the US; the USA spends crazy amounts of cash on military R&D (to the point where its almost a public works program pretending to be a private industry, but thats a discussion for another thread); their technology is, frankly, the best in the world when it comes to warfare. Even allowing for the time gap, they'd have to do alot of catching up whilst at the same time going through a painful reunification process.

Please actually watch the Homefront story trailer. In the Homefront fiction, South and North Korea unite diplomatically. There isn't even a mention of North invading South.

And never make the assumption that technology assures superiority over numbers and good tactics. Vietnam, anyone? Or, even better, observe the Millenium Challenge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millennium_Challenge_2002). Tactics will always trump even the most advanced technology.

1) Why would a -diplomatically- united Korean invade the US? What motativation is there? Especially if the US economy is in the toilet at the time. This makes HomeFronts story seem even more contrivied to me.

2) NK tactics are unlikely to be even half as good as US tactics; bare in mind the last actual war their fought was 50 years ago (whilst its still technically on going, there hasn't been much in the way of ground warfare in all that time), whereas the US has been fighting wars all over the place, including asymetric wars like Vietnam, and whilst they haven't mastered it fully, they are quite familar with it. Additionally, Vietnam-style tactics make underlying assumptions about local support which I would find hard to believe could be meet in mainland USA.

3) Vietnam tactics are good if your invading over land - whereas a mass amphian assault does not really fall into that field.

Fronzel:

Vyress:

Mr.Gompers:
Sounds interesting, though I can't figure out why Korea would ever attempt to invade the U.S.

You don't know much about NORTH Korea then.
This article speaks of a United Korea which would mean by 2027 - according to this transcript - South Korea would have been taken over by North Korea. (they are on hostile terms) It's not about Korea invading; it's about North Korea invading South Korea and then the U.S.
Big difference.

South Korea and U.S. are allies. Just wanted to throw it out there.

That only makes it more silly a scenario. North Korea takes over the South and gets away with it? Shouldn't the shit have hit the fan right then? Even if you put South Korea aside, Japan would be screaming for US intervention. The game is only set 17 years into the future. So the US has to fall so far as to fail to respond to a threat to two allies in East Asia, then get invaded itself? And Korea's supposed to be holding down Asia and invading something as huge and far away as America?

I never said it made sense, I just said what that transcript was about. It's not MY transcript you know.

The plot could never happen but this looks interesting.

exactly my point

JUMBO PALACE:
I'm looking forward to this game actually. MW2 gave me a taste but I really want to fight a (virtual) war on US soil.

Play World in Conflict.

Its only 2-3 years old and its a great game. Cold War going hot isn't exactly interesting, but you will get what you are looking for.

You'd pretty much have to enjoy the game as some sort of masochistic fantary. If the entire world simulateneously declared war on the United States, they wouldn't get very far. Seriously. The United States, including the War on Iraq and Afghanistan, spends more on its military than the entire world combined. Even China, in 2027 (assuming it still grows at 10%), wouldn't have the ability to invade the United States if it continues the same military buildup, and China won't invade the US if the US can't pay off its debt to China (How does that work?).

The idea of the DPRK and the ROK diplomatically unifying in 2013 is also pretty much ridiculous. Even during the Roh administration's Sunshine Policy, the two were far from BFF. China and Taiwan are in a far better position for diplomatic reunification (considering the latter's dependence on the former's economy), and no one in his right mind would believe they'd peacefully unify in the next decade. So for the DPRK and the ROK to peacefully unify within 2 years just boggles the mind.

So just enjoy it for the fantasy that it is. But please, don't call it realistic.

Good thing I live in Ohio. Canada isn't too far from where I live.

Worgen:
I wonder why its north korea and not someplace we share a border with like mexico or canada

Because everyone knows that once Canada launches it's invasion of the USA, that's it. Any scenario of petty resistance against the Canadian overlords would be laughably futile, and they decided trying to make a game around that would simply be too challenging for the player.

The notion of Korea invading the U.S. is ridiculous. Keep in mind during the Korean War, both sides needed outside help to fight each other. The North needed the Chinese, the South needed the U.S. and the UN. Still then the war became a stale-mate. That said, I don't see how Korea can invade the U.S. In all the major wars, each side had allies. The authors come up with this contrived notion that the U.S. will not have allies when invaded, while a rogue state like N. Korea will? Furthermore, N.Korea currently does not have enough food to feed it's own people, do you think it will have resources to feed it's army, as well? 17 years from now they will have fewer resources as the world population increases.

DannibalG36:
To those who say that Korea invading the US is contrived:

For the purposes of this exercise, I have gotten all my info from Wikipedia. I can verify the sources if necessary.

Homefront's storyline posits that North Korea and South Korea unite into one country in 2013 (not something that is not impossible diplomatically, says my acquaintance, who is a political science major).

Currently, South Korea has a standing army of 3.7 million, complemented by 2500 modern battle tanks and 840 aircraft, as well as full-fledged blue-water navy, replete with destroyers, submarines, and amphibious assault craft. North Korea has an army of 1.21 million, complemented by 4060 tanks, 2500 APCs, and an unspecified number of aircraft. Combined, the two armies would indisputably outnumber the US army. Technologically, the gap between the Korean and US military is not especially large, and the South Koreans would bring a great deal of advanced hardware with them. Suffice to say, a united Korea would certainly be a military force capable of annihilating any local military (with the exception of the PLA).

Note that these figures are peacetime and would certainly increase during wartime.

Homefront then goes on to posit that, by 2017, the United States would be facing a civil and economic crisis as a government overburdened with expenses began to collapse under its own weight (again, not an impossibility if current debt and expenditures continue unchecked).

This crisis would spur a recall of US troops from foreign bases, including all bases in Asia. Without the immediate support of the weakened US, Japan would face an infinitely stronger Korean military. Under threat of annihilation, Japan, an island of capitalism and Western ideals in east Asia would buckle and submit to Korean authority around 2018.

China, Korea's Communist ally, would then openly join the Koreans. China, I would like to note, is not blind to the fact that it lacks a navy, and is currently concentrating on building one. The Chinese would be a MASSIVE bolster to the Koreans.

Around 2022, as the US economy nears collapse, with the American military increasingly undersupplied, Korea continues to annex East Asian and Pacific countries (repeating the conquests of the Japanese Empire prior to WWII). By now, the Koreans and their allies are more than capable of defeating the US (short of a nuclear exchange).

I could stop here, and leave your imaginations to construct how an extremely plausible invasion scenario might play out. Homefront has the Koreans launch some sort of EMP blasting satellite to cripple United States electronics before invading, etc., etc., but this is only one possibility.

Homefront's story is not far-fetched. Think a bit before casting judgment.

Oh, and the story details are all derived from this video: http://g4tv.com/videos/46339/homefront-backstory-trailer/

You based your argument on South Korea joining the North peacefully. One, a majority of the South Korean tanks and jets are actually on loan from the united states as part of the arminstance agreement and two, the south would not give up their freedom without a fight. The North has consistent food shortages, 50+ year old tanks most were built before the cold war and have can only build nukes the size of a ship.

China would not simply bow down to Korean rule and has been distancing itself from North Korea for decades. The 25 million people of the north would have to keep the 50 million of the south under wraps even if they decisively defeated them and annexed them.
If the time span was longer, at least 50 years, so to allow the annexed south to become naturalized with the north its becomes less far fetched but 17 years won't be enough for them to forget about the freedoms they enjoy the north would take away and the scenario has one small country suppressing more then 20 times their population in the more modern countries South Korea, Japan and the US.

China, India, Iran, Brazil or Indonesia are all much more plausible enemies where they have the numbers internally to support a sizable army equipped with modern gear and would be less affected by the global events which are the source of the problems in the United States and its allies.

Jadak:

Worgen:
I wonder why its north korea and not someplace we share a border with like mexico or canada

Because everyone knows that once Canada launches it's invasion of the USA, that's it. Any scenario of petty resistance against the Canadian overlords would be laughably futile, and they decided trying to make a game around that would simply be too challenging for the player.

I know they would have no idea how to counter our Calvary charge and cannons. Yes we still technically have Calvary and cannons in our military. The cannons are the very same ones that were in use when Canada invaded the US and we burnt down the white house, lets see Korea do that.

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