Inversion Dev: Online Passes Are "Dicey"

Inversion Dev: Online Passes Are "Dicey"

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The producer of the upcoming third-person shooter Inversion says that instead of using so-called "online passes" to combat used game sales and piracy, publishers should just make sure their games are worth 60 bucks when they hit the market.

You're probably familiar with the concept of the "online pass" but for those who have somehow managed to miss it, it's a generic name for the single-use codes that publishers use to add extra content like quests and characters, or access to features like online gameplay, to brand-new copies of games. If you buy the game new, you get the content at no charge; if you buy used, on the other hand, you have to pay extra for it. The idea is to help publishers recover some of the revenue they lose when people pick up pre-owned copies of games.

But Rick White of Saber Interactive, the studio currently working on Inversion, thinks that's the wrong way to go. He doesn't deny that used game sales are a problem for publishers, but says the challenge is to find ways to encourage gamers to buy new rather than punishing them for buying used.

"For me personally putting locks in the game to force you not to buy pre-owned is dicey. I would rather do something like we're doing with Inversion where we're giving you multiplayer, we're giving you co-op, we're giving you a cool, compelling story and lots of cool elements in the game," he told CVG.

"One thing we need to commit to as gamers and developers is to make you want to own our game because there's a lot of content, make you want to own it because you can play with your friends by playing co-op and playing multiplayer," he continued. "Make it $60 worth. Make your game truly worth the $60 and make it good. Put your love and passion into it and people are going to want to own your game. I mean, do people really rent Call of Duty?"

It's a good idea but a tough sell. A game longer than eight hours is as likely to be seen as an overly-demanding time sink these days as it is a good value for the price, and the online arena is so utterly dominated by a handful of titles that often it hardly seems worth the effort to even try. I love the idea of new games consistently being worth the full price of admission but realistically, I just don't see it happening.

Inversion, by the way, is slated to come out in February 2012 for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3.

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This is a big problem for me as an avid supporter of Gamefly. I absolutly love it. Lets me play every game I want and play mediocre games without fear of buyers remorse.

Playing Dragon Age was a bit annoying when I figured out I missed a whole main character but hey worked out well selling gems and lets face in in RPG's with big parties you pick your favs and run with them.

I DO rent Call of duty. I bought 2 and played the multiplayer a LOT for about a month or so then got bored. I realized that if that was the only game I played from gamefly over the 2 months it still was cheaper then buying new. The only sticky point was when my friends buy the new map packs and I'm not investing in that...Depends how many 100's hours you want to sink into an FPS i guess.

I recently gameflew Dead Space 2 and its multiplayer at least had a trial period, which seems like a good middle ground. I don't know the details because I didnt try the multiplayer but hey, just shows theres more then one solution to this problem.

I am very much a single player ...player I enjoy the multiplayer on occasion but the campaign is what I love. These rediculously short campaigns are a real drag. Im sorry if you bought MOH, gamefly people. I will not pay 60 bucks for an 8 hour single player. Never. Open ended time a la Fallout is another story.

Thank you!

Hopefully their game will be worth the full price at retail, but I'm sick of this weak-ass justification of the online pass system, worse still from those who suck up and pay.

I remember one of the reasons why I stopped buying every game at full price. MoH: Rising Sun. Me and a friend completed it in three hours, and promptly returned it.

I think from then on I only bought a handful of titles brand new. If you want me buying your game as soon as it comes out, it needs to be worth the price. Good online/Co-Op is effective, but companies have obviously seen that and started to slap online onto everything.

The used game market won't be going anywhere. You already have ways to generate money, so stop with this crap.

It sounds pretty naive to me. Yeah, I'm sure there's lots of content in your game... that people will pirate. Or they'll play and trade in, and someone else will pick it up cheap because they can. If it were so simple as "make good games, piracy won't affect them and no one will trade them in" surely we'd never have seen systems like the online pass start in the first place?

bombadilillo:
These rediculously short campaigns are a real drag. Im sorry if you bought MOH, gamefly people. I will not pay 60 bucks for an 8 hour single player. Never. Open ended time a la Fallout is another story.

How do you have so much free time? Christ, I only managed to complete bulletstorm in a day because I literally put everything aside. Even then I barely managed it.

*GASP*
Quality control? What will they think of next?

bombadilillo:
These ridiculously short campaigns are a real drag. Im sorry if you bought MOH, gamefly people. I will not pay 60 bucks for an 8 hour single player. Never. Open ended time a la Fallout is another story.

dogstile:
How do you have so much free time? Christ, I only managed to complete Bulletstorm in a day because I literally put everything aside. Even then I barely managed it.

Why would you WANT to finish a game in one day?
That's the whole point here, it's supposed to be an investment. If the game is good you'll want to spend as much time playing it as possible i.e. you want it to LAST. As great as a solid afternoon of gaming is, I would't pay 60 bucks for it. And didn't someone once say that a truly good game should be able to stand on single-player alone?
Can't quite remember who it was though.

^^^^^^^^^ Said it better then me.

dogstile:

bombadilillo:
These rediculously short campaigns are a real drag. Im sorry if you bought MOH, gamefly people. I will not pay 60 bucks for an 8 hour single player. Never. Open ended time a la Fallout is another story.

How do you have so much free time? Christ, I only managed to complete bulletstorm in a day because I literally put everything aside. Even then I barely managed it.

What are you talking about? I don't want to beat a game in one day. Thats 60$ I'd like it to take a week or two of casual gaming to beat. I don't want to finish a game in one sitting. I don't know how you got loads of free time from that.

HankMan:
*GASP*
Quality control? What will they think of next?

bombadilillo:
These ridiculously short campaigns are a real drag. Im sorry if you bought MOH, gamefly people. I will not pay 60 bucks for an 8 hour single player. Never. Open ended time a la Fallout is another story.

dogstile:
How do you have so much free time? Christ, I only managed to complete Bulletstorm in a day because I literally put everything aside. Even then I barely managed it.

Why would you WANT to finish a game in one day?
That's the whole point here, it's supposed to be an investment. If the game is good you'll want to spend as much time playing it as possible i.e. you want it to LAST. As great as a solid afternoon of gaming is, I would't pay 60 bucks for it. And didn't someone once say that a truly good game should be able to stand on single-player alone?
Can't quite remember who it was though.

as someone who can usually beat a game in a single day, it sometimes happens on accident.

My proof is Fallout New Vegas; I was only about 12 hours into it and was running with the NCR when BAM! Final Mission.

Sometimes the endings just sneak up on you [Section 8], others, the game is just really short, or the single player is really a training room for the multiplayer [CoD series, and I think Wolfenstien for the xBox, but it might of been for the PC].

OT: The main problem is that there are hardly games worth a full $60 price tag, sure, they might be fun, but when you dig deep enough, is that game you just got done playing really worth $60?

I point to Bulletstorm, I think its a good game, I was even talking with a freind about doing a short LP of it, but I would only rent it, since to me it isnt worth that $60 I could spend on stuff such as food or Funcom Points for AO...........

I am still ashamed of AO having an item mall

But more on topic, I cant help but feel that the developer is saying this as a marketing ploy:

"Hey, hate the idea of spending another $15 on a game for media that is already on the disk? OUR GAME DOESN'T HAVE THAT!"

now had this come from say a CEO of a publisher or equivalent, I wouldn't have a problem with it. But he is partially right, while I wont rush out to buy the next Call of Duty, I also wont buy a game used if it has a Project $10 scheme with it. I bought the game, used yes, but the point is I should be able to access the media on the disk I just bought without paying more.

That is the entire point of buying games used, is so you don't have to pay MORE.

[evidence, Bad Company 2, bought used for $30-ish a few months back, new was lowered down to about $45 at my local game store, but of course I needed to buy the stupid multiplayer pack, completely negating the point of me buying it used. I have yet to play that game (again, I had bought it new when it was released, sold it soon afterwords), fuck DICE.]

Your right it is kinda a cheep shot coming out and publicly shouting.

All this trend is going to do is hurt the second hand market. People will get burned like Kalezian buying used and either. 1. Stop buying used, or 2. Research more before they purchace. Im sure gamestop will soon (if they already haven't) just put a sticker on boxes saying XTRA MONEY REQUIRED TO MULTIPLAY. And ultimatley these companies will expose themselves to fewer gamers.

Ideally the game should be so amazing that after you buy second hand Bad Company 2 you just cant wait another minute for Bad Company 3 and you buy it new.

bombadilillo:
All this trend is going to do is hurt the second hand market. People will get burned like Kalezian buying used and either. 1. Stop buying used

That's the whole idea.

Aris Khandr:

bombadilillo:
All this trend is going to do is hurt the second hand market. People will get burned like Kalezian buying used and either. 1. Stop buying used

That's the whole idea.

Them not buying used does not mean they will buy new.

This is the piracy areguement all over. Not every used game sale is equal to a lost New game sale. Like every pirated game does not equal a lost game sale.

People buying used games arent going to have 3x the money all of a sudden to buy a new game.

So what is the strategy? To topple the used game market while pissing off customers and hope it works out all right?

I think it will lead to more piracy. If i bought a PC game and it told me to pay 15$ to play it when I installed, I would just find a patch. Screw this I payed for it. Don't tell me I can't play.

I usually buy new anyway... So yeah lesson of the day check if EA is publishing it, if not then buy used awayyyyyyyyy.

3x the cost? No. But Gamestop usually prices their used copies at only $5 less than a new one. That's what they're trying to kill.

Just to point out, the folks at Extra Credits (right here on the Escapist) already put together a video on this concept.

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/extra-credits/2068-Project-Ten-Dollar

And maybe I'm just jaded, but Rick White's quote comes across more as marketing than actual reporting: "Our game is AWESOME! So you'll pay full price. It's so freaking cool you just won't be able to buy it new, because it's that cool." All he needs is a pair of sunglasses and someone to queue up "Won't get fooled again" by The Who.

P.S. Anyone who claims to have beaten fallout:NV in a day is either full of it, or spent the whole time reading a FAQ for "quickest run through," skipping 90% of the content. Neither one is something we should aspire to.

Most SP content is only worth 20-30$ at the most, they really should start selling SP and MP content on 2 separate discs at 2 separate prices. At least if its 20$ and a sequel comes out in 9 months you wont fill ripped off.

bombadilillo:
^^^^^^^^^ Said it better then me.

dogstile:

bombadilillo:
These rediculously short campaigns are a real drag. Im sorry if you bought MOH, gamefly people. I will not pay 60 bucks for an 8 hour single player. Never. Open ended time a la Fallout is another story.

How do you have so much free time? Christ, I only managed to complete bulletstorm in a day because I literally put everything aside. Even then I barely managed it.

What are you talking about? I don't want to beat a game in one day. Thats 60$ I'd like it to take a week or two of casual gaming to beat. I don't want to finish a game in one sitting. I don't know how you got loads of free time from that.

8 hours is a single day, for me. I usually don't have that time. An 8 hour campaign will usually last me weeks unless i'm so excited to play a game (like the bulletstorm example) that I play through it in a day.

So if you consider 8 hours short, i'm assuming you have lots of free time. Sorry if i'm wrong.

Simply reducing prices by a bit is a good way to get sales.

Example: Steam. Games have a habit of making back their budget and more because they're half off. I know TF2 did this many times over with sales. But again, you have to make the game worth the money.

Kalezian:

My proof is Fallout New Vegas; I was only about 12 hours into it and was running with the NCR when BAM! Final Mission.

What? I played it for about 50 hours before coming across the final mission. And I was running with the NCR as well!

Truly-A-Lie:
It sounds pretty naive to me. Yeah, I'm sure there's lots of content in your game... that people will pirate. Or they'll play and trade in, and someone else will pick it up cheap because they can. If it were so simple as "make good games, piracy won't affect them and no one will trade them in" surely we'd never have seen systems like the online pass start in the first place?

The online pass isn't about piracy, no matter how much they say it is. They just started lumping in used game buyers with pirates for their purposes. They want to transpose the ill feelings people feel toward pirates to people who don't want to pay full price for a game that may not be worth it.

OT: It used to be you couldn't give a good game away. I remember when I found Final Fantasy 6 used after my copy was lost. It was like buried treasure. No one gave that game up. There were lots of good games that I didn't trade away. I would love to see developers take some kind of initiative. Lots of companies do. WoW has new expansions with lots of new content every few years (this is not a defense of Blizzard), Dragon Age Origins released a whole slew of expansions, even borderlands had a bunch of added content over the course of a year. And those are games that only come to mind because they are recent.

The only thing that really smells bad to me is the idea that a game has to have a strong online component to be good or successful (EA should probably fuck off). This is completely false, but I can see them using some kind of bullshit element like that to justify some kind of pass. 4 of the top 5 critically acclaimed experiences in recent memory only had a single player component. And if you look at PC Games that have a single player campaign and the DRM pissed everyone off (thank you Ubisoft), then you can probably understand where this whole idea leads.

PS. If more games had stronger gameplay rather than just flashier graphics, a lot of people would want to own them. Yes this would bolster sales, yes more "pirates" would buy them.

PPS. Piracy is a shit poor excuse for what companies do. I don't care if you love them or hate them, that is just a fact.

PPPS. I have taken this sufficiently off topic, and everyone should feel free to rip on me if they want, haha. Late night rants can be fun though, you have to admit.

Irridium:
Simply reducing prices by a bit is a good way to get sales.

Example: Steam. Games have a habit of making back their budget and more because they're half off. I know TF2 did this many times over with sales. But again, you have to make the game worth the money.

The whole video game industry has come to the conclusion that sales past the first few months don't matter. I have made the point lots of times that games sell a large portion upon release, but can still sell for years afterwards. But, this view is not acceptable by most companies it seems. I mean, Valve gets it, keep selling a game, keep making money. I don't know why it's so hard for the Activisions/EA's/Ubisofts of the world to understand, or the rest of the business community that seems ok with this flawed business model. I mean, TF2 has had so many updates and enhancements it freakin' ridiculous. I think I bought it for like $10 on sale. I also don't care to see this increased pricing PC Games. We should pay more for a PC Game because the consoles pay more? I haven't bought a non digital game since 2008. And that was only because I lived in New Mexico at the time, in the middle of nowhere, with the worlds shittiest internet. It's cheaper for digital distribution, companies bring in more because they aren't paying 40-50% to Gamestop. I WILL not pay $60 for a game. I'll wait till the prices come down. Next week is a good example. Three games listed in Game Informer as coming out that I am anticipating. Dragon Age 2, Deus Ex: Human Revolution, and Homefront. Well, Deus Ex is the only one selling for $50, so guess what gets my sale till prices drop.

Food for though.

Irridium:
Simply reducing prices by a bit is a good way to get sales.

Example: Steam. Games have a habit of making back their budget and more because they're half off. I know TF2 did this many times over with sales. But again, you have to make the game worth the money.

Kalezian:

My proof is Fallout New Vegas; I was only about 12 hours into it and was running with the NCR when BAM! Final Mission.

What? I played it for about 50 hours before coming across the final mission. And I was running with the NCR as well!

you probably did more side-quests than I did, I essentially went straight to where my quests said to go to.

Baresark:
[quote="Irridium" post="7.267902.10253031"]Simply reducing prices by a bit is a good way to get sales.

Three games listed in Game Informer as coming out that I am anticipating. Dragon Age 2, Deus Ex: Human Revolution, and Homefront. Well, Deus Ex is the only one selling for $50, so guess what gets my sale till prices drop.

The problem is that the prices DON'T drop. You can go into Gamestop and see games that are upwards of six months old still selling at sixty dollars.

The reason why Steam is so successful and why the used game market is so popular is BECAUSE they introduce that price drop. The older the used game the farther it'll drop down in price. After three or four months there are significant differences in the prices of used games and its new counterpart. That's where the problem is.

They pointed this out in the Extra Credits video, but that's one major difference between the movie industry and the game industry. Some of those movies have budgets that blow our game making budgets, even on the PS3, out of the water. But they STILL lower the prices. But in the game industry we have none of that. At least nothing that's publisher regulated and industry spread. That's where Gamestop comes in.

Rant on buying used games: I get ragged on all the time for "only" buying used games. This filth the industry has been spreading about used games players being just as bad as pirates is spreading. I've actually been harassed at the counter of my local game store JUST BECAUSE they noticed I always buy used. First off, I'm a fifteen year old. I'm too young to have a steady job. I'm sorry I don't make enough through my chores and freelancing to buy multiple sixty dollar games a month. But don't blame me for buying used when the publishers give me no incentive to buy new. And no, "If you don't buy new we're going to take a bunch of content away from you", doesn't count. That's a punishment for buying used, that doesn't actually give me a good reason to buy the game at full price.

Jamie Doerschuck:

Baresark:
[quote="Irridium" post="7.267902.10253031"]Simply reducing prices by a bit is a good way to get sales.

Three games listed in Game Informer as coming out that I am anticipating. Dragon Age 2, Deus Ex: Human Revolution, and Homefront. Well, Deus Ex is the only one selling for $50, so guess what gets my sale till prices drop.

The problem is that the prices DON'T drop. You can go into Gamestop and see games that are upwards of six months old still selling at sixty dollars.

The reason why Steam is so successful and why the used game market is so popular is BECAUSE they introduce that price drop. The older the used game the farther it'll drop down in price. After three or four months there are significant differences in the prices of used games and its new counterpart. That's where the problem is.

They pointed this out in the Extra Credits video, but that's one major difference between the movie industry and the game industry. Some of those movies have budgets that blow our game making budgets, even on the PS3, out of the water. But they STILL lower the prices. But in the game industry we have none of that. At least nothing that's publisher regulated and industry spread. That's where Gamestop comes in.

The thing is more people buy movies so it does kind of offset their price drops.

Of course gamestop is still going to sell the game for $60 (used: $59) six months down the road. People pay it. That's the problem, gamers are so willing to be bullied into trading in for $2 while buying used for a $2 savings, paying some money for a game that's not going on sale for months (because if they don't, "they'll be left out in the cold"), paying this fee for online service, that fee for online pass, paying absurd prices for dlc, and buying games that already have content set aside to be sold to them separately.

I've ranted about this before but as long as gamers continue to prove themselves to be the least savvy consumers this side of new car lots, the publishers, retailers, and console makers will continue to take advantage of us.

That's why I refuse to shop at Gamestop, that's why I didn't buy the rrod machine and if I do I'm not paying for online, it's why I don't pre-order (and I've never had a problem getting a game launch day/week at a real store anyway), and it's why I don't buy games that set aside gameplay content at launch for different retailer pre-orders and/or to just sell later (capcom & rockstar).

The thing is, if gamers continue to, not just roll over and give away their money, but to go so far as to defend these companies that come up with these kinds of schemes, things like online pass are only the beginning. If publishers think they can get away with it, they will sell us a demo for $60 and then sell us the rest of the game in 8 $20 packets. And if it's a company/franchise with enough fanboys, they will.

8 hours is still too short in my books. I want something that will keep me occupied for a while if I'm paying full price.

If companies want to stop folks buying second-hand games, then the only sensible way is too make sure people don't want to trade their games in. I'll want to keep a game a lot longer if it's got good re-play value than if it hasn't. Downloadables made after the game are a smart move too (though ones already in the game that need unlocking are just an insult to the players, particularly as not all players are going to have a decent internet conection).

GonzoGamer:

Jamie Doerschuck:

Baresark:
[quote="Irridium" post="7.267902.10253031"]Simply reducing prices by a bit is a good way to get sales.

Three games listed in Game Informer as coming out that I am anticipating. Dragon Age 2, Deus Ex: Human Revolution, and Homefront. Well, Deus Ex is the only one selling for $50, so guess what gets my sale till prices drop.

The problem is that the prices DON'T drop. You can go into Gamestop and see games that are upwards of six months old still selling at sixty dollars.

The reason why Steam is so successful and why the used game market is so popular is BECAUSE they introduce that price drop. The older the used game the farther it'll drop down in price. After three or four months there are significant differences in the prices of used games and its new counterpart. That's where the problem is.

They pointed this out in the Extra Credits video, but that's one major difference between the movie industry and the game industry. Some of those movies have budgets that blow our game making budgets, even on the PS3, out of the water. But they STILL lower the prices. But in the game industry we have none of that. At least nothing that's publisher regulated and industry spread. That's where Gamestop comes in.

The thing is more people buy movies so it does kind of offset their price drops.

Of course gamestop is still going to sell the game for $60 (used: $59) six months down the road. People pay it. That's the problem, gamers are so willing to be bullied into trading in for $2 while buying used for a $2 savings, paying some money for a game that's not going on sale for months (because if they don't, "they'll be left out in the cold"), paying this fee for online service, that fee for online pass, paying absurd prices for dlc, and buying games that already have content set aside to be sold to them separately.

I've ranted about this before but as long as gamers continue to prove themselves to be the least savvy consumers this side of new car lots, the publishers, retailers, and console makers will continue to take advantage of us.

That's why I refuse to shop at Gamestop, that's why I didn't buy the rrod machine and if I do I'm not paying for online, it's why I don't pre-order (and I've never had a problem getting a game launch day/week at a real store anyway), and it's why I don't buy games that set aside gameplay content at launch for different retailer pre-orders and/or to just sell later (capcom & rockstar).

The thing is, if gamers continue to, not just roll over and give away their money, but to go so far as to defend these companies that come up with these kinds of schemes, things like online pass are only the beginning. If publishers think they can get away with it, they will sell us a demo for $60 and then sell us the rest of the game in 8 $20 packets. And if it's a company/franchise with enough fanboys, they will.

Lmao.. I only stop at Gamestop when they have their dumb sales. And then I pile my Edge Card on top of it (they forced me to get it when in reality all I wanted was the magazine..). Sometimes I'll trade in some crappy PS2 games that I have laying around. By the time I'm through they end up practically giving everything away to me.. =]

And pre-ordering is just a huge sham. Not ONLY have I never had any trouble buying a game launch week, but I've also never had any trouble getting any of the slightly cool things in the special.. Edition.. Pack things. Even those content codes end up on eBay! If I want something there are plenty of outlets for me to go buy it other than pre-ordering the game and shelling out a lot of money to have it.. At the same time as everyone else.

Jamie Doerschuck:

GonzoGamer:

Jamie Doerschuck:

The problem is that the prices DON'T drop. You can go into Gamestop and see games that are upwards of six months old still selling at sixty dollars.

The reason why Steam is so successful and why the used game market is so popular is BECAUSE they introduce that price drop. The older the used game the farther it'll drop down in price. After three or four months there are significant differences in the prices of used games and its new counterpart. That's where the problem is.

They pointed this out in the Extra Credits video, but that's one major difference between the movie industry and the game industry. Some of those movies have budgets that blow our game making budgets, even on the PS3, out of the water. But they STILL lower the prices. But in the game industry we have none of that. At least nothing that's publisher regulated and industry spread. That's where Gamestop comes in.

The thing is more people buy movies so it does kind of offset their price drops.

Of course gamestop is still going to sell the game for $60 (used: $59) six months down the road. People pay it. That's the problem, gamers are so willing to be bullied into trading in for $2 while buying used for a $2 savings, paying some money for a game that's not going on sale for months (because if they don't, "they'll be left out in the cold"), paying this fee for online service, that fee for online pass, paying absurd prices for dlc, and buying games that already have content set aside to be sold to them separately.

I've ranted about this before but as long as gamers continue to prove themselves to be the least savvy consumers this side of new car lots, the publishers, retailers, and console makers will continue to take advantage of us.

That's why I refuse to shop at Gamestop, that's why I didn't buy the rrod machine and if I do I'm not paying for online, it's why I don't pre-order (and I've never had a problem getting a game launch day/week at a real store anyway), and it's why I don't buy games that set aside gameplay content at launch for different retailer pre-orders and/or to just sell later (capcom & rockstar).

The thing is, if gamers continue to, not just roll over and give away their money, but to go so far as to defend these companies that come up with these kinds of schemes, things like online pass are only the beginning. If publishers think they can get away with it, they will sell us a demo for $60 and then sell us the rest of the game in 8 $20 packets. And if it's a company/franchise with enough fanboys, they will.

Lmao.. I only stop at Gamestop when they have their dumb sales. And then I pile my Edge Card on top of it (they forced me to get it when in reality all I wanted was the magazine..). Sometimes I'll trade in some crappy PS2 games that I have laying around. By the time I'm through they end up practically giving everything away to me.. =]

And pre-ordering is just a huge sham. Not ONLY have I never had any trouble buying a game launch week, but I've also never had any trouble getting any of the slightly cool things in the special.. Edition.. Pack things. Even those content codes end up on eBay! If I want something there are plenty of outlets for me to go buy it other than pre-ordering the game and shelling out a lot of money to have it.. At the same time as everyone else.

I only stop in gamestop when I have a gift card AND they're having one of their sales: buy2 get1 is the only way their used games are even moderately priced. Even then, there's only one gamestop in the whole NYC area that I can shop at without feeling the need to throttle someone: the game I bought is always in the case, and they don't try selling me magazine subscriptions, and pre-orders for games that are a year away. They even let me buy new games I didn't pre-order. If it wasn't for the crappy prices, it would be a great store.
Back when I didn't have much money, I used to sell old/crappy games on ebay, that way the purchaser could get a better price and I could get more money. But even now I trade in at the entertainment outlet (it may just be in nyc; not sure) get a better value - buying or selling.

My earlier post looks a little reactionary now that I'm sober but I stand by it 100%. It's not anything that requires rioting in the streets or anything but I think gamers need to protest with their wallets a bit more or I have no doubt that $60 demos will be on the way. It's actually pretty easy. Just don't pre-order (shop at a real store if need be), don't pay every fee that's asked of you, and don't pay lots of money when the value seems compromised. Those are actually words to live by: the reason I'm not poor anymore.

Online pass on Homefront pissed me off that I refused to buy it. So I can see why this studio is saying that online passes fail.

bombadilillo:

Aris Khandr:

bombadilillo:
All this trend is going to do is hurt the second hand market. People will get burned like Kalezian buying used and either. 1. Stop buying used

That's the whole idea.

Them not buying used does not mean they will buy new.

This is the piracy areguement all over. Not every used game sale is equal to a lost New game sale. Like every pirated game does not equal a lost game sale.

People buying used games arent going to have 3x the money all of a sudden to buy a new game.

So what is the strategy? To topple the used game market while pissing off customers and hope it works out all right?

I think it will lead to more piracy. If i bought a PC game and it told me to pay 15$ to play it when I installed, I would just find a patch. Screw this I payed for it. Don't tell me I can't play.

Hell yeah! The gaming industry is enjoying free passes to legal benefits no other industry is having. Do you stop people from selling or giving away books? Movies? CLOTHES? That's the danger of the digital medium; more benefits to the producer, more restrictions for the consumer...It's outrageous, we shouldn't have to take it, but the politicians are basically sucking the industry's penis right now.

Why is the link to Inversion go to amazon and not the game website or at least dev page? OT: I like the one time pass stuff as described here. I should get free stuff for supporting the developer, and people who buy second hand and don't support the developer should be given an opportunity to do so. If they don't want to then fine, they don't get the free stuff that I enjoyed.

 

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